Ruth Fleishman: !OINK




 
  • ©2002, Ruth Fleishman, !OINK
  • ©2002, Ruth Fleishman, !OINK
  • ©2002, Ruth Fleishman, !OINK
  • ©2002, Ruth Fleishman, !OINK
  • ©2002, Ruth Fleishman, !OINK
  • ©2002, Ruth Fleishman, !OINK
  • ©2002, Ruth Fleishman, !OINK
  • ©2002, Ruth Fleishman, !OINK
  • ©2002, Ruth Fleishman, !OINK
  • ©2002, Ruth Fleishman, !OINK
  • ©2002, Ruth Fleishman, !OINK
  • ©2002, Ruth Fleishman, !OINK
  • ©2002, Ruth Fleishman, !OINK
  • ©2002, Ruth Fleishman, !OINK
  • ©2002, Ruth Fleishman, !OINK

Artist(s):


Title:


!OINK

Exhibition:


SIGGRAPH 2002: Art Gallery

Creation Year:


2002

Category:


Installation

Artist Statement:


I make interactive works on CD-ROM, but I work in a manner that uses more traditional mixed-media materials. These works are then digitalized and collaborated (combined) with imagery made on computer. Software is exploited for its specific aesthetic and visually unique qualities.

The concerns and themes of my current work include:

• An emphasis on the aesthetics and specific visual capacities that digital imagery allows when engaged with more traditional art forms.

• A use of technology as a tool that is secondary to the ideas and content of the work, as opposed to focusing on the capacities of the newest technology.

• Non-linear environments and the vast capacity for art to occur in time-based and non-linear structures.

• Blurring lines between art and design, narrative and non-narrative environments.

• Creating very lush visual environments, specific to digital conditions.

!OINK was an exploration of the process required to deconstruct a book into multimedia. My aim was to make the most of the non-linear environment that interactive work facilitates and at the same time honor the spirit and attitude of the novel. It was an opportunity to adapt a developed aesthetic to a writer’s vision.

Technical Information:


These pictures are a selection of source material used to make the interfaces for !OINK. Some are Photoshop layers that make up the final image for each interface.

These images give a feel for the very diverse way in which I use a range of imagery and source material. I then collaborate and integrate it, so it will work harmoniously together. Sometimes my sources include paper constructions, digital photographs, previous unrelated drawings, collage, digital imaging, and scanned objects.

Unused images often make their way to other projects or become source material themselves, adding to my ever expanding resource collection. This is the most vital aspect to my working process. I am an eager collector
and hoarder of imagery and objects that usually lend themselves to use at a later date. I usually don’t have a specific purpose in mind for this content. I collect these source materials with an instinct for what will integrate well with other source materials I have collected
despite their apparent differences.

When I am making interactive work, this type of documentation sits close to my computer. There are also screen grabs of other interfaces still in progress. Having a range of the images at hand allows me to get an idea of how the project is coming together as a whole, and I
can make sure there is continuity with all screens.

Technically, I use Photoshop and Director, a scanner, a digital camera, and a PC.