Scenocosme: SphèrAléas




 
  • ©2007, Scenocosme, SphèrAléas

Artist(s):


Title:


SphèrAléas

Exhibition:


SIGGRAPH 2007: Global Eyes

Creation Year:


2007

Medium:


Interactive / sound / image installation

Category:


Installation

Artist Statement:


Scenocosme use interactive art, music, and architecture to create evolutionary and interactive artwork. With multiple forms of expression, they invite the spectator to participate in the center of collective musical or choreographic performances. SphèrAléas is made of a half-spherical structure and an evolutionary device for producing visual and sonorous shapes. This space is ideal for collective performances; it accommodates in its center a constellation of visible shapes, spinning sound loops, and luminous vibratory elements. The dome-bubble hosts universes and objects endowed with life. They are articulated as subtle microcosms in conversation. Visitors become actively engaged in this matrix space and create sonorous and visual interstices that awaken their senses and open unexpected territories to their imaginations. Visitors (creators) are offered ephemeral face-to-face opportunities for dialogue, and they give themselves up to this sensitive complicity, cradled by flows of random emotions. The show is ever changing.

Technical Information:


SphèrAléas allows visitors to create moments of interchange and immerses them in spaces that feel like daydreams. Aléas, an original virtual music software/instrument, arose from a reflection on how to materialise or draw sound with 3D images. It’s a synthesis software that manipulates sounds and abstract images to create a dialogue with reality. It creates an interactive, sensitive relationship with the audience,
and it allows visitors to create, modify, observe, and manipulate moving 3D shapes. By manipulating the sensors, visitors can continuously change the whole structure by playing with the different variables: order, sideby-
side positioning, overlapping, speed, rhythm, harmonic pitch, etc. Thus, as they position new materials, visitors create sustained tunes made of rhythmic relationships animated by subtle temporal intervals. Each visitor appropriates the system to create particular processes of repetitive polyphony, where parts overlap then disappear into hypnotic
swirls. The audience determines the future of the work by experimenting with infinite orchestrations.