Papers



Title: The Immediacy of the Artist's Mark in Shape Computation
Author(s):
Exhibition: SIGGRAPH 2010: TouchPoint: Haptic Exchange Between Digits
Category: Paper

Abstract/Summary/Introduction:

This paper contributes to the area of computation in the production of artistic form. The author-artist describes a computational system in the form of a curvilinear, parametric shape grammar. Based on an analysis of over 3,000 entries in her traditionally hand-drawn sketchbooks, she describes the grammar that synthesizes drawings in the design language of her evolving style and serves as a tool for selfunderstanding of her artistic process.

[View PDF]
Title: The Interactive Image: A Media Archaeology Approach
Author(s):
Exhibition: SIGGRAPH 2017: Unsettled Artifacts: Technological Speculations from Latin America
Category: Paper

Abstract/Summary/Introduction:

This paper examines the history of the influential Interactive Image computer graphics showcase, which took place at museum and conference venues from 1987 to 1988. The authors present a preliminary exploration of the historical contexts that led to the creation of this exhibition by the Electronic Visualization Lab (EVL), which included the integrated efforts of both artists and computer scientists. In addition to providing historical details about this event, the authors introduce a media archaeology approach for examining the cultural and technological contexts in which this event is situated.

[View PDF]
Title: The Next Generation Poetic Experience
Author(s):
Exhibition: SIGGRAPH Asia 2013: Art Gallery
Category: Paper

Abstract/Summary/Introduction:

This paper presents the motivation, background and implementation of The Muses of Poetry, an interactive installation that combines dynamically generated character animation, semantic analysis, natural voice interaction and affect in poetry. Inspired by the subjectivity and ethereal quality of this literary art, we wanted to enhance the act of reciting poetry by providing a set of characters the possibility to “understand” and manifest the emotional content of the poems through facial expressions and affective speech. We believe that this original installation will bring poetry closer to a wider audience, while creating a playful, interactive and surprising experience for the user.


Title: The Pleasures of Immersion and Engagement: Schemas, Scripts, and the Fifth Business
Exhibition: SIGGRAPH 2001: n-space
Category: Paper

Abstract/Summary/Introduction:

Presently, designers of interactive narratives and video games have only a slender understanding of the aesthetic experiences their audiences and users seek. Using schema theory, this study articulates the two varieties of aesthetic pleasures that users of interactive works enjoy: immersion and engagement. It uses schema theory to define the characteristics of immersion and engagement in both
conventional and new media. After examining how readers’
experiences of these two different aesthetics may be enhanced or diminished by interface design, options for navigation, and other features, the essay concludes by looking beyond immersion and engagement to “flow,” a state in which readers are both immersed and engaged.

It must be granted that there is some value in mystification, labyrinth, or surprise in the environment. .. This is so, however, only under two conditions. First, there must be no danger of losing basic form or orientation, of never coming out. The surprise must occur in an overall framework; the confusions must be small regions in a visible whole. Furthermore, the labyrinth or mystery must in itself have some form that can be
explored and in time apprehended. Complete chaos without
hint of connection is never pleasurable. -Kevin Lynch,
The Image of the City”

Those roles which, being neither those of Hero nor Heroine, Confidante nor Villain, but which were nonetheless essential to bring about the recognition or the denouement, were called the Fifth Business in drama and opera companies organized according to the old style; the player who acted these parts was often referred to as Fifth Business. -Robertson Davies, The Fifth Business:
The Deptford Trilogy”


Title: The Proceduralist Manifesto
Author(s):
Exhibition: SIGGRAPH 1989: Art Show
Category: Paper

Abstract/Summary/Introduction:

Computer art’ has become a meaningless term, because soon virtually all art will be computerized in some way or another. The author introduces the concept of proceduralism as a label to represent a special class of art, one that constructs images using abstract qualitative and quantitative parameters, rather than simulates classical drawing and painting. This approach to making art ditters radically from drawing and painting approaches because the picture-making process is detached from the picture. The net result is that an entirely new area of creativity has been unveiled for the artist. As such, proceduralism is a logical successor to conceptual/process art; it is a major art movement and a new medium.

[View PDF]
Title: The Readers Project: Procedural Agents and Literary Vectors
Author(s):
Exhibition: SIGGRAPH 2011: Tracing Home in The Age of Networked Techniques
Category: Paper

Abstract/Summary/Introduction:

The Readers Project is an aesthetically oriented system of software entities designed to explore the culture of human reading. These entities, or “readers,” navigate texts according to specific reading strategies based upon linguistic feature analysis and real-time probability models harvested from search engines. As such, they function as autonomous text generators, writing machines that become visible within and beyond the typographic dimension of the texts on which they operate. Thus far the authors have deployed the system in a number of interactive art installations at which audience members can view the aggregate behavior of the readers on a large screen display and also subscribe, via mobile device, to individual reader outputs. As the structures on which these readers operate are culturally and aesthetically implicated, they shed critical light on a range of institutional practices – particularly those of reading and writing – and explore what it means to engage with the literary in digital media.

[View PDF]
Title: The SF of Technoscience: The Politics of Simulation & A Challenge for New Media Art
Author(s):
Exhibition: SIGGRAPH 2000: Art Gallery
Category: Paper

Abstract/Summary/Introduction:

“In fact, science fiction … is no longer anywhere, and it is everywhere, in the circulation of models, here and now, in the very principle of the surrounding simulation.”
JEAN BAUDRILLARD

“Biology is becoming an information science … and it will take increasingly powerful computers and software to gather, store, analyze, model and distribute that information.”
BEN ROSEN
Chairman, Compaq Computer Corporation

“The best way to predict the future is to invent it.”
RICHARD FEYNMAN

One of the significant characteristics of the last decade, and the new millennium, is the way in which advancements in biotechnology and medicine have come to the attention of the public, through the media, as one of the primary areas in which the future is being vigorously imagined. What distinguishes biotechnology from other sciences is
the way in which it is increasingly fusing genetic code with computer code, encapsulated in what lncyte Pharmaceuticals calls “point-andclick biology.”

[View PDF]
Title: The Tao of Postmodernism: Computer Art, Scientific Visualization and Other Paradoxes
Author(s):
Exhibition: SIGGRAPH 1989: Art Show
Category: Paper

Abstract/Summary/Introduction:

The author suggests that a paradigm shift must occur in art criticism to assimilate the nonlinear branching of aesthetic activities in our era. These activities include computer art and scientific visualization, and they reflect many issues addressed in postmodern dialogue such as our image-synthetic, “simulacrum” society. Postmodernism unexpectedly informs most disciplines, including the natural sciences, and is a cultural systemic norm that relates to our electronic information age. The Taoist concept of oneness is used as a metaphor for the interrelatedness of electronic-mediated societies, and this social connectedness explains the enfolding and complex nature of contemporary aesthetic activity. A cybernetic paradigm might provide a better model for criticism than modernism or postmodernism, since this paradigm presents a holistic view that concentrates on creativity and the organization of interrelated systems. The convergence of art with science is assumed as a logical interdisciplinary outgrowth of this electronic oneness.

[View PDF]
Title: The Wizard of Ethereal Pictures and Virtual Places
Author(s):
Exhibition: SIGGRAPH 1989: Art Show
Category: Paper

Abstract/Summary/Introduction:

Renaissance artists constructed pictorial space using algorithms based on Euclidean geometry. Computer artists use algorithms based on the analytic geometry of Descartes to compute pictures as well as the subjects in them. An examination of the workings of these two different types of algorithm reveals that the computer offers a radical new approach to making art, which is not yet well understood. Postmodern algorithms for picturemaking are more evanescent than their Renaissance counterparts because computers process information conceptually instead of storing it physically. The computer is neither a passive medium nor a pliant tool, but an active creative partner.

[View PDF]
Title: Thick & Thin: "Direct Manipulation" & The Spatial Regimes of Human-Computer Interaction
Exhibition: SIGGRAPH 2001: n-space
Category: Paper

Abstract/Summary/Introduction:

Consider a design trajectory, figured on one end by the screens of early command-line computer interfaces and Coleco Vision’s “Donkey Kong” (1981), and on the other, by the more complex and finely rendered spaces depicted in “Tomb Raider III: The Adventures of Lara Croft” (1999) and Apple’s newly-released Mac OS X.

Lara Croft runs, jumps, tumbles, and blasts away at her opponents in visual fields that are more subtle and perspectivally sophisticated
than those inhabited by Mario and “Donkey Kong.” The responses of the screen images to the user’s keyboard, gamepad, or joystick have been enormously enhanced, in both quickness and variety. But the fundamental spatial tropology – the tropology of space: abstract space, empty space, space that doesn’t get in the way of players or their agents on the other side of the glass – remains consistent, from the earliest to the most recent examples of both desktop computing interfaces and computer gaming. The conceptual and psychological commonplace that grounds play in the domains inhabited by Mario and Lara, and the principles of “direct manipulation” in the graphical user interface, is the assumption of a permeable field of agency, essentially free of substance or resistance, or marked only by the sorts of resistance that a more efficient game pad, a faster processor, or a more “intuitive” visual metaphor, may eliminate.

In this paper, I propose that the “thin” spaces typical of the modern GUI and videogaming appear self-evident or “intuitive” to users and designers because they draw upon conventions of spatial thought that strategically foreclose traits of actual embodied encounters of human-computer interaction. It is desirable, I argue, to reconceive the forms of space commonly presupposed by the contemporary discourses of the GUI – to grasp these spaces materially, not as empty domains, open to the user’s purposive manipulations of objects sited within them, but rather as persistently impermeable, resistant – “thick” – spaces, in which objects are only imperfectly manipulated and incompletely detachable from the lived moment of the interaction.

[View PDF]
Title: Topics on Aesthetic Data Visualization: Viewpoints, Interpretation, and Alternative Senses
Author(s):
Exhibition: SIGGRAPH Asia 2013: Art Gallery
Category: Paper

Abstract/Summary/Introduction:

Aesthetic data visualization, which looks at complex data sets from an ingenious perspective, is difficult to empirically organize due to its insufficient records. Fortunately, insightful artists and curators have recently provided some notable interdisciplinary exhibitions and publications. This author was a recent participant at such an event; however, it is not easy to summarize the various projects into a single vision because each artist’s value, method, philosophy, and aesthetic preference are unique. This paper categorizes data visualization based on various topics. Aesthetic data visualization is similar to conventional data visualization in that it organizes ambiguous data into a database. Artists then tend to integrate the information into their art. In this regard, it might be possible to identify tendencies and examine data as contemporary iconology, as well as discover hidden possibilities of recent aesthetic data visualizations.

[View PDF]
Title: Topics on Bible Visualization: Content, Structure, Citation
Author(s):
Exhibition: SIGGRAPH Asia 2013: Art Gallery
Category: Paper

Abstract/Summary/Introduction:

Text visualization begins with understanding text itself which is material of visual expression. To visualize any text first and the expressive approaches theoretical foundation about the about the approaches for text visualization by diverse examples of test visualization which are derived through the various characteristics of the text. To do this, we chose the “Bible” test which is well known globally and digital data of it can be accessed easily and thus diverse test visualizations examples exist and analyzed the example of the bible text visualization. We derived the unique characteristics of the text-content, structure, and quotation as criteria for analyzing and supported validity of analysis by adopting at least 2-3 examples for each criterion. In the result, we can comprehend that the goals and expressive approaches are decided depending on the unique characteristics of the Bible text. We expect to build theoretical method for choosing the materials and approaches by analyzing more diverse examples with various point of views on the basis of this research.

[View PDF]
Title: Touching Space: Using Motion Capture and Stereo Projection to Create a "Virtual Haptics" of Dance
Author(s):
Exhibition: SIGGRAPH 2010: TouchPoint: Haptic Exchange Between Digits
Category: Paper

Abstract/Summary/Introduction:

This paper describes the work of a group of artists in Australia who used real-time motion capture and 3D stereo projection to create a large-scale performance environment in which dancers seemed to “touch” the volume. This project re-versions Suzanne Langer’s 1950s philosophy of dance as “virtual force” to realize the idea of a “virtual haptics” of dance that extends the dancer’s physical agency literally across and through the surrounding spatial volume. The project presents a vision of interactive dance performance that “touches” space by visualizing kinematics as intentionality and agency. In doing so, we suggest the possibility of new kinds of human-computer interfaces that emphasize touch as embodied, nuanced agency that is mediated by the subtle qualities of whole-body movement, in addition to more goal-oriented, task-based gestures such as pointing or clicking.

[View PDF]
Title: Transdisciplinarity, Yesterday and Today
Author(s):
Exhibition: SIGGRAPH 2007: Global Eyes
Category: Paper

Abstract/Summary/Introduction:

In the first part, this paper intends to show some reasons for the advent of transdisciplinarity as a strategy of knowledge in the 21st century. In the second part, it develops the basis for a transdisciplinary attitude required to solve complex and contemporary problems, and to promote a new articulation among science, art, technology, and culture.

[View PDF]
Title: Transforming the Commonplace through Machine Perception: Light Field Synthesis and Audio Feature Extraction in the Rover Project
Author(s):
Exhibition: SIGGRAPH 2017: Unsettled Artifacts: Technological Speculations from Latin America
Category: Paper

Abstract/Summary/Introduction:

Rover is a mechatronic imaging device inserted into quotidian space, transforming the sights and sounds of the everyday through its peculiar modes of machine perception. Using computational light field photography and machine listening, it creates a kind of cinema following the logic of dreams: suspended but mobile, familiar yet infinitely variable in detail. Rover draws on diverse traditions of robotic exploration, landscape and still-life depiction, and audio field recording to create a hybrid form between photography
and cinema. This paper describes the mechatronic, machine perception, and audio-visual synthesis techniques developed for the piece.

[View PDF]
Title: Translation + Pendaphonics = Movement Modulated Media
Author(s):
Exhibition: SIGGRAPH 2012: In Search of the Miraculous
Category: Paper

Abstract/Summary/Introduction:

Translation is a multimedia dance performed on a vertical wall filled with the projected image of a lunar surface. Pendaphonics is a low-cost, versatile, and robust motion-sensing hardware-software system integrated with the rigging of Translation to detect the dancers’ motion and provide real-time control of the virtual moonscape. Replacing remotely triggered manual cues with high-resolution, real-time control by the performers expands the expressive range and ensures synchronization of feedback with the performers’ movements. This project is the first application of an ongoing collaboration between the Motivational Environments Research Group at Arizona State University (ASU) and STREB Extreme Action Company.

[View PDF]
Title: Transmission: A Telepresence Interface for Neural and Kinetic Interaction
Author(s):
Exhibition: SIGGRAPH 2014: Acting in Translation
Category: Paper

Abstract/Summary/Introduction:

Transmission is both a telepresence performance and a research project. As a real-time visualization tool, Transmission creates alternate representations of neural activity through sound and vision, investigating the effect of interaction on human consciousness. As a sonification project, it creates an immersive experience for two users: a soundscape created by the human mind and the influence of kinetic interaction. An electroencephalographic (EEG) headset interprets a user’s neural activity. An Open Sound Control (OSC) script then translates this data into a real-time particle stream and sound environment at one end. A second user in a remote location modifies this stream in real time through body movement. Together they become a telematic musical interface—communicating through visual and sonic representation of their interactions.

[View PDF]
Title: Ut Pictura Poesis: Drawing into Space
Author(s):
Exhibition: SIGGRAPH 2013: XYZN: Scale
Category: Paper

Abstract/Summary/Introduction:

In 1735, Leonard Euler presented a solution to the practical problem of whether a route could be plotted to cross each of seven bridges in Konigsberg once. His negative solution used the simplest of markmaking
strategies to resolve a conceptual problem. Euler did not actually cross the town’s bridges, but used them to resolve questions of connectivity, after which diagrammatic representations can be seen as the restructuring of logical problems to allow for inductive reasoning, for fruitful application beyond theory. But what if such a working graphic has as its target something that is simply incomprehensible? What are the upper limits of the denotational logic of such diagrams? This paper presents a drawing-research project that tests the cognitive advantages of technical graphics by directly engaging with things that cannot be made easier to understand through their use.

[View PDF]
Title: Virtual Imaginations Require Real Bodies
Author(s):
Exhibition: SIGGRAPH 1999: technOasis
Category: Paper

Abstract/Summary/Introduction:

Virtual reality (VR) works of art conjure up ideas such as virtual sex, virtual frontiers, and to some, disembodiment. Those who uphold the notion of disembodiment claim that works of art that embrace VR technology necessarily encourage a state that affirms the Cartesian duality in which people can leave Earth, nature, and body behind. I counter this notion because I do not believe that the mind can be separated from the body; rather, the two are inexplicably intertwined. Although this “Gibsonesque” scenario is rich with metaphors and metaphysical implications, I suggest that any virtual space is an embodied experience because the imagination of the artist and the viewer refer back to the body, to nature, and to the Earth. From the physical reality of Earth and our bodies, we may understand and perceive many more realities, perhaps facilitated by virtual space art installations. In fact, I maintain that even the virtual is real. It is a perception that is a real experience, which makes reference to our encounters with the physical world and our flesh.

[View PDF]
Title: Visual Anecdote
Author(s):
Exhibition: SIGGRAPH 2010: TouchPoint: Haptic Exchange Between Digits
Category: Paper

Abstract/Summary/Introduction:

The discourse on information visualization often remains limited to the exploratory function -its potential for discovering patterns in the data. However, visual representations also have a rhetorical function: they demonstrate, persuade, and facilitate communication.

In observing how visualization is used in presentations and discussions, I often notice the use of what could be called “visual anecdotes.” Small narratives are tied to individual data points in the visualization, giving human context to the data and rooting the abstract representation in personal experience. This paper argues that these narratives are more than just illustrations of the dataset; they constitute a central epistemological element of the visualization. By considering these narrative elements as parts of the visualization, its design and knowledge organization appear in a different light.

This paper investigates how the “story” of data representation is delivered. By means of ethnographic interviews and observations, the author highlights the different aspects of the visual anecdote, a specific point where the exploratory and the rhetorical functions of visualization meet.

[View PDF]
Title: Visual History with Choson Dynasty Annals
Author(s):
Exhibition: SIGGRAPH 2016: Data Materialities
Category: Paper

Abstract/Summary/Introduction:

For this paper, the authors selected three historical events taken from the Annals of the Choson Dynasty that represent dramatic and tragic stories about parents and their sons for data visualization. By connecting names with entities indicating conductions from history books, they found interesting patterns that tell stories with embedded relations. The visualized images in this paper were mainly code-generated, based on the data of the Annals, with some graphic embellishment added.

[View PDF]
Title: Wearable Forest Clothing System: Beyond Human-Computer Interaction
Author(s):
Exhibition: SIGGRAPH 2009: BioLogic: A Natural History of Digital Life
Category: Paper

Abstract/Summary/Introduction:

Wearable Forest is a garment that bioacoustically interacts with distant wildlife in a remote forest through a networked remote-controlled speaker and microphone. It expresses the unique bioacoustic beauty of nature and allows users to interact with a forest in real time through a network to acoustically experience a distant forest soundscape, thus merging humans and nature without great environmental impact. This novel interactive sound system can create a sense of unity between users and a remote soundscape, enabling users to feel a sense of belonging to nature even in the midst of a city. This paper describes the theory of interaction between the Human and the Biosphere through the design process of the Wearable Forest concept.

[View PDF]
Title: What Does a Very Large Scale Conversation Look Like?
Author(s):
Exhibition: SIGGRAPH 2001: n-space
Category: Paper

Abstract/Summary/Introduction:

INTRODUCTION
The new electronic spaces that I am interested in have the following characteristics in common:
• They are large. Many server sites now support interchanges between hundreds and thousands of people. Usenet newsgroups and large listservs are the most common such sites. I call these usually text-based, usually asynchronous interchanges very large-scale conversations.”
• They are network-based. More specifically, they support network-based communities. The boundaries of these spaces and the communities they support are not geographic boundaries. Communities of artists, writers, and scientists are examples of pre-Internet, network-based communities (communities based upon a social network and some shared interests or needs). Network-based communities are of a different kind than geographically based communities like neighborhoods, cities, and nations. Network-based communities (for example, the scientific community) have continued to grow with the help of new network technologies, but contemporary technologies have also engendered a variety of new communities (for example, the open source community).
• They are public. As more and more people gain access to the Internet from their homes or schools rather than from their workplaces, the Internet increasingly becomes a space for public discussion and exchange. Very large-scale conversations are a common event within the confines of large industry (for example, the huge number of communications among thousands of people required to design and build an airplane or coordinate production of a film). However, these have a distinctly different character than the very large-scale conversations in which people are participating as individuals rather than as employees. The Internet is engendering the production of new public spaces that may offer the means to reinvigorate public discourse.11 2

From the perspective of the history of media, very large-scale conversation (VLSC) is a new and mostly unexplored phenomenon. At no other point in history have we had a medium that supports many-to-many communications among hundreds or thousands of people. VLSC takes place across international borders, often on a daily or hourly basis. Unlike in older media (for example, telephones) participants in these very large-scale conversations usually do not know the addresses of the others before the start of a conversation. Current social-scientific theories and tools we have for understanding and investigating conversations and discourse include those of discourse analysis” and conversation analysis.13 These existing theories and techniques can handle analysis of small-scale conversations (for example, interactions among 30 or fewer people). But it is not obvious how the existing methods can be scaled up to handle the huge, many-to-many interactions that have now become commonplace on the Internet. So the challenge is this: What software can be designed to help us navigate the new public spaces of VLSC?

[View PDF]
Title: Within an Ocean of Light: Creating Volumetric Lightscapes
Author(s):
Exhibition: SIGGRAPH 2012: In Search of the Miraculous
Category: Paper

Abstract/Summary/Introduction:

This paper documents explorations into an alternative platform for immersive and affective expression within spatial mixed reality installation experiences. It discusses and analyzes experiments that use an advanced LED cube to create immersive, interactive installations and environments where visitors and visuals share a common physical space. As a visual medium, the LED cube has very specific properties and affordances, and optimizing the potential for such systems to create meaningful experiences presents many interlinked challenges. Two artworks exploring these possibilities are discussed. Both have been exhibited internationally in a variety of settings. Together with this paper, the works shed some light on the design considerations and experiential possibilities afforded by LED cubes and arrays. They also suggest that LED grids have potential as an emerging medium for immersive volumetric visualizations that occupy physical space.

[View PDF]
Title: XEPA - Autonomous Intelligent Light and Sound Sculptures That Improvise Group Performances
Author(s):
Exhibition: SIGGRAPH 2014: Acting in Translation
Category: Paper

Abstract/Summary/Introduction:

XEPA anticipates a future where machines form their own societies. Going beyond mere generative art, machines will exhibit artistic creativity with the addition of artistic judgment via computational aesthetic evaluation. In such a future our notions of aesthetics will undergo a radical translation. The XEPA intelligent sculptures create animated light and sound sequences. Each sculpture “watches” the others and modifies its own aesthetic behavior to create a collaborative, improvisational performance. No coordination information or commands are used. Each XEPA independently evaluates the aesthetics of the other sculptures, infers a theme or mood being attempted, and then modifies its own aesthetics to better reinforce that theme. Each performance is unique and widely varied. XEPA is an ever-evolving artwork, intended as a platform for ongoing experiments in computational aesthetic evaluation.

[View PDF]
Title: Yturralde: Impossible Figure Generator
Author(s):
Exhibition: SIGGRAPH 2015: Hybrid Craft
Category: Paper

Abstract/Summary/Introduction:

This research highlights José María Yturralde’s most significant involvement and contributions to early computer art from 1968 to 1973. Yturralde collaborated with artists and scientists to expand and redefine his understanding of shapes, and explored ways that the mainframe computer could be used as a tool for complementing his art practices. He is known for developing a mathematical model with which he was able to create a highly sophisticated program where Penrose geometries could be recombined algorithmically. However, there is limited evidence and access to the code of the actual software. The authors’ goal is to further understand Yturralde’s contribution by developing a re-significance of his model, which they have accomplished through a modern interpretation of manuscripts.

[View PDF]
« First ‹ Previous 1 3 4 5