Anne Behrnes: Contemplations on Inner Space (Detail)

 
  • ©, Anne Behrnes

Artist(s):


Title:


    Contemplations on Inner Space (Detail)

Exhibition:


Medium:


    Digital imaging and painting

Size:


    15.36 x 48.44"

Category:



Artist Statement:


    Contemplations on Inner Space 4 explores the relationship between individuals and their physical and psychological environments. It looks at how psychological states of mind can create conflicts between what is tangibly present and what is emotionally seen. The idea of venturing into “personal reality” is immensely important when reflecting upon the suggestion that what we see is dictated by our perception, thereby becoming a reality in and of itself.

    As we reflect upon the idea that place is directly related to psychological states of being, we begin to realize that what we perceive and what is “in actuality” around us may not be the same. Thus we begin to recognize that not everything we encounter is easily understood or arrived at, particularly if we are dealing with psychological presence. Contemplations on Inner Space 4 is about that creation of psychological environments that mimic individuals’ states of mind. As such, there is a noticeable absence of a “physical” body within it. This space is not an environment that demands the presence of a figure; rather the “literal” figure is replaced by a “psychological” presence. In essence, we become conscious that we are peering into a land that is based purely upon an individual’s perception. We see their “world” through their “eyes.”


Technical Information:


    Contemplations on Inner Space 4 was created with various techniques and programs. Starting with digital photographs, the artist used Photoshop to set the foundation of the image. She began by compositing multiple digital photographs together, then integrated additional digital photographs to incorporate texture, applied various “blend modes,” and adjusted their opacities and transparencies. In addition, she brought the image into Painter, where she used a variety of brushes to blend, draw, and paint.

    The result is a “composite” image that has the look and feel of a “painting.”