SIGGRAPH 1983: Art Show




 

Chair(s):


Co-Chair(s):


Location:

Detroit, Michigan

Dates:

July 25th-29th, 1983

Art Show Overview:

These selections represent a concern that an artist’s work should transcend technique, realize the full potential of the chosen medium, and reflect a consistency in their overall body of work.


Committee(s):

Jury:


Additional Information:

Catalog Design: David Wise


Exhibition Artworks:



Exhibition Writings and Presentations:


    Title: A Medium Matures: The Myth of Computer Art
    Author(s):
    Category: Essay
    Abstract Summary:

    We embark upon SIGGRAPH’s second decade with a growing conviction that the leading edge of culture us no longer defined by the fine arts community — by what’s being shown in galleries, purchased by museums, published in art magazines or talked about in SoHo lofts. The excitement and power and significance today seems to lie in electronic technology, especially the computer, which we are convinced will reveal the way to unlimited new aesthetic horizons and produce wholly new art forms. And yet the idea of computer art — of an art unique to the computer — remains after twenty years an unrealized myth, its horizons barely in view, its forms still to be manifest. For, ironically, most of what is understood as computer art today represents the computer in the service of  those very same visual art traditions which the rhetoric of new technology holds to be obsolete.

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    Title: Artists/Technologists: The Computer As An Imaging Tool
    Author(s):
    Category: Essay
    Abstract Summary:

    Despite the fact that the computer is a relatively recent invention, the debate over whether or not computer-generated art works can truly be called “art” has roots in a much older argument about technology. The usual objection to “computer art” is based on the fear that somehow the com­puter  — like Hal in the film 2001 — will take control, eliminating the role of the ar­tist. A less paranoid but equally misplaced response construes the absence of hand­work to represent easy art, requiring less skill than more traditional forms. Similar ob­jections were raised when photography was discovered. In 1859, Charles Baudelaire considered photography as nothing less than a major threat to the entire fine art tradition.

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    Title: Mapping A Sensibility: Computer lmaging
    Author(s):
    Category: Essay
    Abstract Summary:

    “The work of art,” as the surrealist André Breton said, “is valuable only so far as it is vibrated by the reflexes of the future.” These “reflexes of the future” have introduced, since the early 1900s, increasingly powerful visual technologies. To rephrase André Breton — in certain critical epochs, art anticipates effects that are only fully realized by newly emerging technology and new art forms.

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