Artworks Data Table


Title Artist Name Exhibition Creation Year Image Artist Statement Technical Info Process Info Collaborators Sponsors Category Medium Size Website Keywords
!OINK Ruth Fleishman SIGGRAPH 2002: Art Gallery 2002 ©2002, Ruth Fleishman ©2002, Ruth Fleishman ©2002, Ruth Fleishman ©2002, Ruth Fleishman

I make interactive works on CD-ROM, but I work in a manner that uses more traditional mixed-media materials. These works are then digitalized and collaborated (combined) with imagery made on computer. Software is exploited for its specific aesthetic and visually unique qualities.

The concerns and themes of my current work include:

• An emphasis on the aesthetics and specific visual capacities that digital imagery allows when engaged with more traditional art forms.

• A use of technology as a tool that is secondary to the ideas and content of the work, as opposed to focusing on the capacities of the newest technology.

• Non-linear environments and the vast capacity for art to occur in time-based and non-linear structures.

• Blurring lines between art and design, narrative and non-narrative environments.

• Creating very lush visual environments, specific to digital conditions.

!OINK was an exploration of the process required to deconstruct a book into multimedia. My aim was to make the most of the non-linear environment that interactive work facilitates and at the same time honor the spirit and attitude of the novel. It was an opportunity to adapt a developed aesthetic to a writer’s vision.

N/A

These pictures are a selection of source material used to make the interfaces for !OINK. Some are Photoshop layers that make up the final image for each interface.

These images give a feel for the very diverse way in which I use a range of imagery and source material. I then collaborate and integrate it, so it will work harmoniously together. Sometimes my sources include paper constructions, digital photographs, previous unrelated drawings, collage, digital imaging, and scanned objects.

Unused images often make their way to other projects or become source material themselves, adding to my ever expanding resource collection. This is the most vital aspect to my working process. I am an eager collector and hoarder of imagery and objects that usually lend themselves to use at a later date. I usually don’t have a specific purpose in mind for this content. I collect these source materials with an instinct for what will integrate well with other source materials I have collected despite their apparent differences.

When I am making interactive work, this type of documentation sits close to my computer. There are also screen grabs of other interfaces still in progress. Having a range of the images at hand allows me to get an idea of how the project is coming together as a whole, and I can make sure there is continuity with all screens.

Technically, I use Photoshop and Director, a scanner, a digital camera, and a PC.

N/A N/A Interactive & Monitor-Based Interactive CD-ROM N/A N/A digital imagery and interactive CD-ROM
"Having said, the grass is always greener ... in this case it was." Flood series Denis A. Dale SIGGRAPH 1995: Digital Gallery 1995 ©1995, Denis A. Dale N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Iris ink-jet print 24 x 35 inches N/A N/A
"Is it truly so unfathomable that an imperfect girl might be perfectly loved?" Sophia Brueckner DAC Online Exhibition 2015: Altered Books - Digital Interventions 2014 ©2014, Sophia Brueckner

For this ongoing series of work, I combine popular algorithms with traditional romance novels. After scanning all of the covers, I apply Photoshop’s Photomerge feature (originally intended to stitch together photos to make panoramas) to the images to produce dreamy, hybrid landscapes. Because the covers are so similar, the algorithm often finds areas that it believes should overlap. I print these landscapes on porcelain commemorative plates. Each plate also features a Popular Highlight from a romance novel on Kindle.


Media: Porcelain plates, romance novels, Photoshop’s Photomerge feature, Kindle Popular Highlights


The source material fits under “Fair Use”…but each plate incorporates many books. Most of the source imagery is so changed that the original book is no longer recognizable.

N/A N/A N/A N/A Artist Book Porcelain plates, romance novels, Photoshop's Photomerge feature, Kindle Popular Highlights N/A N/A N/A
"Laberint", from the series, "Postals de Barcelona" Animática SIGGRAPH 1992: Art Show N/A ©, Animática

In Laberint, live action and computer-generated characters weave between real and virtual worlds. Two locations in Barcelona, Parc Laberint and the old Gothic Quarter, serve as inspiration. This piece draws from the ancient myth that woman and man were once androgynous form. Beginning in the Cave, woman and man split. They enter the Garden, then move on to life in the City. Trying again to become one, they take off into the future.

Hardware: SGI, Cyberware Laser Scanner
Software: Wavefront, In-house

N/A N/A N/A Animation & Video N/A 2:30 N/A N/A
"One whisper added to a thousand others will become a roar of discontent" Sophia Brueckner DAC Online Exhibition 2015: Altered Books - Digital Interventions 2014 ©2014, Sophia Brueckner

For this ongoing series of work, I combine popular algorithms with traditional romance novels. After scanning all of the covers, I apply Photoshop’s Photomerge feature (originally intended to stitch together photos to make panoramas) to the images to produce dreamy, hybrid landscapes. Because the covers are so similar, the algorithm often finds areas that it believes should overlap. I print these landscapes on porcelain commemorative plates. Each plate also features a Popular Highlight from a romance novel on Kindle.


The source material fits under “Fair Use”…but each plate incorporates many books. Most of the source imagery is so changed that the original book is no longer recognizable.

N/A N/A N/A N/A Artist Book 
Media: Porcelain plates, romance novels, Photoshop's Photomerge feature, Kindle Popular Highlights N/A N/A N/A
#1A Chantal Zakari SIGGRAPH 1990: Digital Image-Digital Cinema 1989 ©1989, Chantal Zakari N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung photograph 14 x 11" N/A N/A
#22 Picasso 2 Duane M. Palyka SIGGRAPH 1981: Art Show ’81 1981 ©1981, Duane M. Palyka N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Photograph 14 x 18" N/A N/A
#22 Picasso 2 Duane M. Palyka SIGGRAPH 1986: A Retrospective 1979 ©1979, Duane M. Palyka N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Photograph of raster image 16 x 20 in. N/A N/A
#26 Blue Figure Duane M. Palyka SIGGRAPH 1981: Art Show ’81 1981 ©1981, Duane M. Palyka N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Photograph 14 x 18" N/A N/A
#86b.1 Jon Meyer SIGGRAPH 2005: Threading Time 2005 ©2005, Jon Meyer

These two images are part of an ongoing series of multiperspective collages I started in 2001. To construct the collages, I start by taking dozens of digital photographs of an environment. Then I use perspective warps to map the images to a nearly orthographic projection. Finally, I position the
warped images in a three-dimensional computer model. The results are presented both as screen-based computer installations and as still images. In the installations, I show the models rotating in real
time but disable the hardware depth buffer, further collapsing the image plane.My intention is to create spaces that simultaneously evoke the real, the imaginary, and the virtual (imediated reality), without letting the viewer settle on any one reading. The images and installations emphasize the co-existence and co-dependence of these three
modes of experience. The work is inspired by Lorie Novak’s multiple-exposure images and by David Hockney’s Polaroid montages.

N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Digital C print 30 inches x 24 inches N/A N/A
#86b.13 Jon Meyer SIGGRAPH 2005: Threading Time 2005 ©2005, Jon Meyer

These two images are part of an ongoing series of multiperspective collages I started in 2001. To construct the collages, I start by taking dozens of digital photographs of an environment. Then I use perspective warps to map the images to a nearly orthographic projection. Finally, I position the
warped images in a three-dimensional computer model. The results are presented both as screen-based computer installations and as still images. In the installations, I show the models rotating in real
time but disable the hardware depth buffer, further collapsing the image plane.My intention is to create spaces that simultaneously evoke the real, the imaginary, and the virtual (imediated reality), without letting the viewer settle on any one reading. The images and installations emphasize the co-existence and co-dependence of these three
modes of experience. The work is inspired by Lorie Novak’s multiple-exposure images and by David Hockney’s Polaroid montages.

N/A N/A N/A N/A Interactive & Monitor-Based Screen-based installation N/A N/A N/A
(7581) From Language/Text II Gloria DeFilipps Brush SIGGRAPH 2003: CG03: Computer Graphics 2003 2003 ©2003, Gloria DeFilipps Brush

This image is from the series Language Text II, which I began in 2001. The images are about the changing aura of language and its relationships with the objects existing in what we call real space. Objects wait to be recognized and enveloped by words, which form trajectories of both communication and miscommunication. Sometimes they are breaths without voice. They seek a secure syntactic position, but meaning is constantly devised, relocated, de-created.

Language slips, revealing and reviving, negotiating the soft and uncertain terrain of thought and interpretation.

The image was made with a scale-model architectural camera, which enables focusing on relatively small objects that are rendered in relatively sharp focus even when they are only inches away from the lens. The source images are then scanned using Photoshop software and digitally mediated.

N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung N/A 20 inches x 24 inches N/A communication and language
(A)I Feel Kiattiyot Panichprecha, Witaya Junma, and Isarun Chamveha SIGGRAPH Asia 2017: Mind-Body Dualism N/A ©, Kiattiyot Panichprecha, Witaya Junma, and Isarun Chamveha

(A)I FEEL is a project to demonstrate how machines learn human emotions by creating a teaching & learning process between humans and machine to analyze human drawing and visualize the drawing in an intuitive and exciting way.

N/A N/A N/A N/A Installation N/A N/A N/A N/A
(R) Doc Series # 1: Our Citizenry Is Ambiguous To The Democracy Laura Rusnak SIGGRAPH 2005: Threading Time 2005 ©2005, Laura Rusnak

I am the child of a pack rat and a neat freak, therefore I hoard, but very specific things. I find myself continually making lists and reorganizing
my life in an endless cycle of setting “things” in their respective places. I believe there is already an over abundance of accessible information repeatedly begging for my attention. I do not
feel the need to create more information to add to the barrage, but to collect, recycle, and re-organize existing information, putting it into some “respective” place. In 1976, Bantam Books published The R Document by Irving Wallace. Almost 30 years, later I incidentally discovered a copy in a
neatly bound Reader’s Digest tucked away at a Goodwill Store near my parents’ home. Although the story is nearly 30 years old, it depicts uncanny similarities to our own current political climate and legislation, such as the Patriot Act. The R Document tells the story of a political conspiracy involving an FBI director, Tynan, who would like to bring about a police state in an effort to control crime, but the proposed 35th Amendment would
undermine the Bill of Rights. Enter our protagonist, the Attorney General, Christopher Collins.The (R) Doc Series is a group of digital collages that are the basis for a future handmade book. The series employs erasure: the act of erasing, rubbing into, scraping out or removing from existence (m-w.com) as a way of altering the original text, jus as, in many socalled “unclassified” documents, words of concern are blackened out, removing not only content, but also context. Viewers of the documents are then left with the various fragments to piece together
into their own interpretations. The (R) Doc Series explores removal of randomly selected words to
create a new, visual rhythmic pattern to the text, transformation of context when words of different levels of importance are obscured or erased, and finally, recycling of a time-worn text from its original linear form into a non-linear aberration.

N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Inkjet print 26.5 inches x 12.5 inches N/A N/A
(R) Doc Series #6: Absently In Hand, Then Down Again Laura Rusnak SIGGRAPH 2005: Threading Time 2005 ©2005, Laura Rusnak

I am the child of a pack rat and a neat freak, therefore I hoard, but very specific things. I find myself continually making lists and reorganizing
my life in an endless cycle of setting “things” in their respective places. I believe there is already an over abundance of accessible information repeatedly begging for my attention. I do not
feel the need to create more information to add to the barrage, but to collect, recycle, and re-organize existing information, putting it into some “respective” place. In 1976, Bantam Books published The R Document by Irving Wallace. Almost 30 years, later I incidentally discovered a copy in a
neatly bound Reader’s Digest tucked away at a Goodwill Store near my parents’ home. Although the story is nearly 30 years old, it depicts uncanny similarities to our own current political climate and legislation, such as the Patriot Act. The R Document tells the story of a political conspiracy involving an FBI director, Tynan, who would like to bring about a police state in an effort to control crime, but the proposed 35th Amendment would
undermine the Bill of Rights. Enter our protagonist, the Attorney General, Christopher Collins.The (R) Doc Series is a group of digital collages that are the basis for a future handmade book. The series employs erasure: the act of erasing, rubbing into, scraping out or removing from existence (m-w.com) as a way of altering the original text, jus as, in many socalled “unclassified” documents, words of concern are blackened out, removing not only content, but also context. Viewers of the documents are then left with the various fragments to piece together
into their own interpretations. The (R) Doc Series explores removal of randomly selected words to
create a new, visual rhythmic pattern to the text, transformation of context when words of different levels of importance are obscured or erased, and finally, recycling of a time-worn text from its original linear form into a non-linear aberration.

N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Inkjet print 26.5 inches x 12.5 inches N/A N/A
(R) Doc Series #8: Threatened And Too Scared ... Laura Rusnak SIGGRAPH 2005: Threading Time 2005 ©2005, Laura Rusnak

I am the child of a pack rat and a neat freak, therefore I hoard, but very specific things. I find myself continually making lists and reorganizing
my life in an endless cycle of setting “things” in their respective places. I believe there is already an over abundance of accessible information repeatedly begging for my attention. I do not
feel the need to create more information to add to the barrage, but to collect, recycle, and re-organize existing information, putting it into some “respective” place. In 1976, Bantam Books published The R Document by Irving Wallace. Almost 30 years, later I incidentally discovered a copy in a
neatly bound Reader’s Digest tucked away at a Goodwill Store near my parents’ home. Although the story is nearly 30 years old, it depicts uncanny similarities to our own current political climate and legislation, such as the Patriot Act. The R Document tells the story of a political conspiracy involving an FBI director, Tynan, who would like to bring about a police state in an effort to control crime, but the proposed 35th Amendment would
undermine the Bill of Rights. Enter our protagonist, the Attorney General, Christopher Collins.The (R) Doc Series is a group of digital collages that are the basis for a future handmade book. The series employs erasure: the act of erasing, rubbing into, scraping out or removing from existence (m-w.com) as a way of altering the original text, jus as, in many socalled “unclassified” documents, words of concern are blackened out, removing not only content, but also context. Viewers of the documents are then left with the various fragments to piece together
into their own interpretations. The (R) Doc Series explores removal of randomly selected words to
create a new, visual rhythmic pattern to the text, transformation of context when words of different levels of importance are obscured or erased, and finally, recycling of a time-worn text from its original linear form into a non-linear aberration.

N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Inkjet print 26.5 inches x 12.5 inches N/A N/A
(re)cognition Stephan Larson SIGGRAPH 2004: Synaesthesia 2004 ©2004, Stephan Larson

“(re)cognition” is not a story with a beginning and end. It is an anima­ tion about the moment when something is realized, the moment of understanding, the moment of comprehension. It is the moment
when something that appears random is suddenly deliberate. Cause and e ect provides the stimulus for change; as one shape interacts with another, a transformation begins to occur that is perhaps more recognizable, perhaps more ambiguous. As these shapes evaporate and coalesce throughout the animation, they begin to provoke awareness – small moments when everything seen makes sense for a short time before dissolving into chaos again. It is an experience of moments, a dance of sorts.

N/A N/A N/A N/A Animation & Video Art & Design Length 3:50 N/A N/A
+ F . . . a touch of red & pink Miguel Chevalier SIGGRAPH 1986: Painting in Light 1986 ©1986, Miguel Chevalier N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Installation Photograph of raster image N/A N/A N/A
. . . . on becoming Joan Truckenbrod SIGGRAPH 1986: Painting in Light 1984 ©1984, Joan Truckenbrod N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Installation Photograph of raster image N/A N/A N/A
... or, The Structure of a Building is Sometimes More Beautiful than the Building Gerald Hushlak SIGGRAPH 1985: Art Show 1983 ©1983, Gerald Hushlak N/A

Hardware: IBAS-Calcomp 718
Software: Intergraph

N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Flatbed vector plots 22 x 30 in N/A N/A
0512 Terry Calen SIGGRAPH 2006: Intersections N/A ©, Terry Calen

Since first becoming aware of 3D rendering technology in the mid-1980s, I believed it was the perfect medium for expressing one’s imagination. While it is most commonly used to mimic reality, I prefer using this technology to create clean, bold, graphical images that clearly do not mimic reality but do have a photographic quality about them.

My underlying inspirational sources are mostly hidden. Although it may be obvious that many of my images are inspired by nature. Those sources are only starting points for exploration and often evolve based on discoveries I make along the way. There are usually several related perspectives to explore, and each may develop separately over time. This was the case with the image presented here. It is one of several images, originally inspired by dreaming about pixels, in which I used rectangular blocks as compositional elements. Each of these images explores, from a slightly different perspective, a long-held fascination with structure.

The image was modeled using Luxology’s Modo subdivision surface modeler, and rendered to 10,000 x 10,000 pixels in Electric Image Animation System. Texturing was done using procedural shaders from El Technology Group, Konkeptoine, and Triple D Tools. Adobe Photoshop was used for compositing and touchup. It was printed on Epson Ultrasmooth Fine Art Paper using Ultrachrome inks and an Epson 7600 printer.

N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung 3D modeled image, archival inkjet print 24" x 24" N/A N/A
1, 2, 3...n,n+1.. Anne Morgan SIGGRAPH 1992: Art Show 1992 ©1992, Anne Morgan N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Laser printouts 20 x 17" (total) N/A N/A
1,000?'s Shelley Lake SIGGRAPH 1988: Art Show 1987 ©1987, Shelley Lake N/A

Hardware: Cray XMP/22, VAX 11/782, Ramtek 9400, IMI 500, E & S PS 300, Calcomp tablet, III DFP
Software: DP3D, Model Prevue, VAX/VMS, COS

N/A N/A N/A Installation stereoscopic slides N/A N/A N/A
1,2,3,0; 0; 5,2,8,4,2,4,1,4 1,2,3,0; 0; 3,2,8,4,1,2,7,4 N/A SIGGRAPH 1986: Painting in Light 1986 ©1986, N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Installation Photograph of raster image N/A N/A N/A
10.000 moving cities - same but different, VR Marc Lee, Antonio Kleber Zea Cobo, Florian Faion, and Jesús Muñoz Morcillo DAC Online Exhibition 2018: Designing Knowledge N/A ©, Marc Lee, Antonio Kleber Zea Cobo, Florian Faion, and Jesús Muñoz Morcillo ©, Marc Lee, Antonio Kleber Zea Cobo, Florian Faion, and Jesús Muñoz Morcillo ©, Marc Lee, Antonio Kleber Zea Cobo, Florian Faion, and Jesús Muñoz Morcillo ©, Marc Lee, Antonio Kleber Zea Cobo, Florian Faion, and Jesús Muñoz Morcillo

10.000 Moving Cities – Same but Different deals with urbanization and globalization in the digital age. The user moves through visual worlds posted publicly by others on social networks such as YouTube, Flickr or Twitter. Here these personal impressions are streamed in real time like windows to our changing world. The viewer participates in the social movements of our time and makes a virtual journey into a constantly new image and sound collages in which one experiences local, cultural and linguistic differences and similarities. In virtual space, this information is visualized on cubes that rise at different heights to become a kind of skyline. The work deals with how our cities are continuously changing and increasingly resemble one. This results in more and more non-places/places of lost places in the sense of Marc Augé’s book and essay Non-Places, which could exist all over the world without any true local identity (mostly anonymous transition zones such as motorways, hotel rooms or airports).

Credits: Marc Lee in collaboration with the Intelligent Sensor-Actuator-Systems Laboratory (ISAS) and the ZAK | Centre for Cultural and General Studies at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and the ZKM | Center for Art and Media Karlsruhe. The telepresence system used is a result of the interdisciplinary project e-Installation for the virtualization of media art.

N/A N/A N/A N/A Augmented Reality/Virtual Reality N/A N/A N/A N/A
1789: A Salute to the French Revolution Cornell University Publications Services SIGGRAPH 1991: Art and Design Show N/A ©, Cornell University Publications Services N/A

Hardware: Apple Macintosh II
Software: Microsoft Word, Aldus PageMaker 3.0, Fontographer.

N/A N/A N/A Design Book 10 x 8.5 N/A N/A
18G90 Mark Wilson SIGGRAPH 1992: Art Show 1990 ©1990, Mark Wilson N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Plotter drawing 36 x 96" N/A N/A
1984 Thomas Porter SIGGRAPH 1985: Art Show 1984 ©1984, Thomas Porter N/A

Hardware: VAX 11/750, MacDonald Dettweiler Fire 240
Software: Ray tracing- T. Porter based on code by T. Duff

N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Cibachrome print 8.5 x 11 in. N/A N/A
1990 Brazilian Ball Poster Taylor & Browning Design Associates SIGGRAPH 1991: Art and Design Show 1990 ©1990, Taylor & Browning Design Associates N/A

Hardware: Apple Macintosh llci Linotronic L-300 (output).
Software: Adobe Illustrator, Quark Xpress, Adobe Separator.

N/A N/A N/A Design Poster 33 x 26.25 N/A N/A
1991 Type Calendar Adobe System Marketing Communications SIGGRAPH 1991: Art and Design Show 1991 ©1991, Adobe System Marketing Communications N/A

Hardware: Apple Macintosh II, Linotronic 300 (output).
Software: Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Type Library.

N/A N/A N/A Design Calendar 11 x 8.5 N/A N/A
19th Century Space Station Frame 0321, stillASTO series Charles A. Csuri SIGGRAPH 2006: Charles A. Csuri: Beyond Boundaries (1963-present) 2001 ©2001, Charles A. Csuri N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Unix environment and AL, LightJet on paper with laminate 76 x 102 cm (30 x 40 in) N/A N/A
1A Edward Zajec SIGGRAPH 1981: Art Show ’81 1981 ©1981, Edward Zajec N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Collage 18 x 18" N/A N/A
1B Edward Zajec SIGGRAPH 1981: Art Show ’81 1981 ©1981, Edward Zajec N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Collage 18 x 18" N/A N/A
2000.12a and 2000.12b Kenneth A. Huff SIGGRAPH 2001: n-space 2001 ©2001, Kenneth A. Huff ©2001, Kenneth A. Huff

Inspired by the random, yet structured beauty and minute details of nature (flora, fauna, and mineral), it is common for my images to include many objects which are similar in form, yet always unique in their structural and surface details. Contrasts also are an important part of my work. For example, organic forms are often implemented using inorganic materials or the rigid structure of a grid may be contrasted with chaotic elements.

In “2000.12a” and “2000.12b,” inversions are used to create much of the contrast. These inversions go well beyond the obvious use of color within each image and between the pair of images. The pointed objects come out of alternate sets of holes and point in opposite directions. Also, the length of the objects is inverted – where the objects are long in one image, they are short in the other.

N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Laser-exposed color photographic print paper each panel 34 inches x 34 inches N/A abstract, nature, organic, and photographic print
2002.7 Kenneth A. Huff SIGGRAPH 2003: CG03: Computer Graphics 2003 2003 ©2003, Kenneth A. Huff

The iridescence of a beetle; the twisting surfaces of a wilting leaf; the spiral forms and sutures of a fossilized mollusk shell; fissures growing in drying mud; the arches, loops, and whorls of a fingerprint – all are examples of the natural forms and patterns that inspire my images. I am intrigued with combining ideas from a number of sources and the contrast and ambiguity arising from those combinations.

Often include many objects in my images – all similar in form, yet each unique in its details. Those details of color and texture mimic the level of physical detail fund m the natural world and create an illusion of reality even while the viewer is confronted with the practical knowledge that the objects illustrated do not exist.

Recently met a scientist who is investigating the micro-structures formed by controlled sintering of ceramic powders. Sintering involves heating, but not melting, of materials to form a coherent mass. Electron micrographs of his research served as the initial inspiration for a series that incorporates numerous small plates, either entirely representing a surface or coating portions of a surface, while at the same time conforming to the contours of the surface.

The major form in 2002.7 is based on an idealized mathematical knot.

The gold forms were constructed using a custom tool that builds the forms, or plates, directly on a given surface.

This image was completed during a working-artist residency at SIGGRAPH 2002.

N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung N/A 41 in x 41 in x 1 in N/A mathematics, nature, and texture
2002_18 Terry Calen SIGGRAPH 2003: CG03: Computer Graphics 2003 2003 ©2003, Terry Calen

The computer provides a wonderful environment for experimentation. No materials are wasted. Setup time is minimal. Tests can be easily and quickly saved. Changes can be made and different versions can be combined. I try to take full advantage of these attributes by incorporating experimentation into my workflow. I usually begin with only a very loose concept in mind. I am often motivated by something I’ve seen. Sometimes a simple shape can begin the process. Through experimentation, I usually discover multiple directions the work could take, and I may spend months exploring these in depth, creating several images along the way. I am currently fascinated by surface relationships and how surfaces can be used as structural elements within a composition. By surfaces, I mean shapes with very little thickness. In three-dimensional modeling, surfaces with no thickness are possible but they do not convey a proper sense of form and substance. I usually want to maintain a sense of reality in my work. I want my scenes to appear to exist in real space and to have physical attributes that suggest they could exist.

My goal is always to present more than the technology I use. I want my images to be emotionally evocative and to succeed on the basis of their visual impact rather than any implied meaning. It’s a grand expectation that may never be completely satisfied. I believe the artist’s initiative begins a process that only develops its full potential through those who experience it. I encourage you to explore for yourself and share your own creativity in the completion of this process.

N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung N/A 24 in x 24 in N/A emotion and experiment
2002_19 Terry Calen SIGGRAPH 2003: CG03: Computer Graphics 2003 2003 ©2003, Terry Calen

The computer provides a wonderful environment for experimentation. No materials are wasted. Setup time is minimal. Tests can be easily and quickly saved. Changes can be made and different versions can be combined. I try to take full advantage of these attributes by incorporating experimentation into my workflow. I usually begin with only a very loose concept in mind. I am often motivated by something I’ve seen. Sometimes a simple shape can begin the process. Through experimentation, I usually discover multiple directions the work could take, and I may spend months exploring these in depth, creating several images along the way. I am currently fascinated by surface relationships and how surfaces can be used as structural elements within a composition. By surfaces, I mean shapes with very little thickness. In three-dimensional modeling, surfaces with no thickness are possible but they do not convey a proper sense of form and substance. I usually want to maintain a sense of reality in my work. I want my scenes to appear to exist in real space and to have physical attributes that suggest they could exist.

My goal is always to present more than the technology I use. I want my images to be emotionally evocative and to succeed on the basis of their visual impact rather than any implied meaning. It’s a grand expectation that may never be completely satisfied. I believe the artist’s initiative begins a process that only develops its full potential through those who experience it. I encourage you to explore for yourself and share your own creativity in the completion of this process.

N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung N/A 24 in x 24 in N/A emotion and experiment
2002_21 Terry Calen SIGGRAPH 2003: CG03: Computer Graphics 2003 2003 ©2003, Terry Calen

The computer provides a wonderful environment for experimentation. No materials are wasted. Setup time is minimal. Tests can be easily and quickly saved. Changes can be made and different versions can be combined. I try to take full advantage of these attributes by incorporating experimentation into my workflow. I usually begin with only a very loose concept in mind. I am often motivated by something I’ve seen. Sometimes a simple shape can begin the process. Through experimentation, I usually discover multiple directions the work could take, and I may spend months exploring these in depth, creating several images along the way. I am currently fascinated by surface relationships and how surfaces can be used as structural elements within a composition. By surfaces, I mean shapes with very little thickness. In three-dimensional modeling, surfaces with no thickness are possible but they do not convey a proper sense of form and substance. I usually want to maintain a sense of reality in my work. I want my scenes to appear to exist in real space and to have physical attributes that suggest they could exist.

My goal is always to present more than the technology I use. I want my images to be emotionally evocative and to succeed on the basis of their visual impact rather than any implied meaning. It’s a grand expectation that may never be completely satisfied. I believe the artist’s initiative begins a process that only develops its full potential through those who experience it. I encourage you to explore for yourself and share your own creativity in the completion of this process.

N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung N/A 24 in x 24 in N/A emotion and experiment
2003.4a and 2003.4b Kenneth A. Huff SIGGRAPH 2004: Synaesthesia 2004 ©2004, Kenneth A. Huff ©2004, Kenneth A. Huff

The iridescence of a beetle; the twisting surfaces of a wilting leaf; the spiral forms and sutures of a fossilized mollusk shell; fissures growing in drying mud; the arches, loops and whorls of a fingerprint – all are examples of the natural forms and patterns that inspire my images. I am intrigued with combining ideas from a number of sources and the contrast and ambiguity arising from those combinations. I often include many objects in my works, all similar in form, yet each unique in its details. Those details of color and texture mimic the level of physical detail found in the natural world and create an illusion of reality even while the viewer is confronted with the practical knowledge that the objects illustrated do not exist, furthering the purposeful ambiguity of the work.

The works were created entirely in Alias Maya, augmented with custom software developed by the artist. Final renderings were completed in a single pass with no compositing. The prints were produced on a Cymbolic Sciences (now Oce) LightJet photographic plotter, which exposes color photographic print paper with a combination of red, green, and blue laser light.

N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Digital image on color photographic paper 62 inches x 62 inches x 2 inches each N/A N/A
2004.4 Kenneth A. Huff SIGGRAPH 2005: Threading Time 2005 ©2005, Kenneth A. Huff

discover: to make known or visible; to obtain sight or knowledge of for the first time.
Miriam-Webster Online Dictionary, 2004
From the first tracing of a finger along the spiral of a seashell, our lives are permeated with the joy of discovery. Forms, patterns, and experiences are layered in our memories and become part of the fundamental cognitive framework through which we identify and classify the world. Tapping into these primal connections, this work evokes a desire to understand and makes possible the thrill of discovering something new. At a distance, these almost familiar forms engage the mind, beginning
a journey of examination and interaction. There is no reference of scale, and the viewer is drawn closer, searching for additional clues that might aid in identification. With each step, the structures trigger subliminal reactions based on past experiences. In the end, the viewer is left with undefinable organic connections suspended in
the deliberate ambiguity of the work, an ambiguity not so abstract as to be without some connection to experience or nature. The creations are abstract, organic, three-dimensional constructions, and while the subject matter is entirely imagined, the works are executed in a highly detailed, photorealistic manner. Inspiration is drawn from a variety of natural patterns and forms, combining ideas from a
number of sources rather than creating literal reconstructions. Overarching themes based on ideas from mathematics and the sciences also weave through the body of work. With a sense of true understanding
placed just out of reach, the experience of the work is in a constant state of renewal and discovery.

N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Chromogenic print 41 inches x 53 inches x 1 inch, framed N/A N/A
2004.5 Kenneth A. Huff SIGGRAPH 2005: Threading Time 2005 ©2005, Kenneth A. Huff

discover: to make known or visible; to obtain sight or knowledge of for the first time.
Miriam-Webster Online Dictionary, 2004
From the first tracing of a finger along the spiral of a seashell, our lives are permeated with the joy of discovery. Forms, patterns, and experiences are layered in our memories and become part of the fundamental cognitive framework through which we identify and classify the world. Tapping into these primal connections, this work evokes a desire to understand and makes possible the thrill of discovering something new. At a distance, these almost familiar forms engage the mind, beginning
a journey of examination and interaction. There is no reference of scale, and the viewer is drawn closer, searching for additional clues that might aid in identification. With each step, the structures trigger subliminal reactions based on past experiences. In the end, the viewer is left with undefinable organic connections suspended in
the deliberate ambiguity of the work, an ambiguity not so abstract as to be without some connection to experience or nature. The creations are abstract, organic, three-dimensional constructions, and while the subject matter is entirely imagined, the works are executed in a highly detailed, photorealistic manner. Inspiration is drawn from a variety of natural patterns and forms, combining ideas from a
number of sources rather than creating literal reconstructions. Overarching themes based on ideas from mathematics and the sciences also weave through the body of work. With a sense of true understanding
placed just out of reach, the experience of the work is in a constant state of renewal and discovery.

N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Chromogenic print 40 inches x 61 inches x 1 inch, framed N/A N/A
2005.1 Kenneth A. Huff SIGGRAPH 2005: Threading Time 2005 ©2005, Kenneth A. Huff

discover: to make known or visible; to obtain sight or knowledge of for the first time.
Miriam-Webster Online Dictionary, 2004

From the first tracing of a finger along the spiral of a seashell, our lives are permeated with the joy of discovery. Forms, patterns, and experiences are layered in our memories and become part of the fundamental cognitive framework through which we identify and classify the world. Tapping into these primal connections, this work evokes a desire to understand and makes possible the thrill of discovering something new. At a distance, these almost familiar forms engage the mind, beginning a journey of examination and interaction. There is no reference of scale, and the viewer is drawn closer, searching for additional clues that might aid in identification. With each step, the structures trigger subliminal reactions based on past experiences. In the end, the viewer is left with undefinable organic connections suspended in the deliberate ambiguity of the work, an ambiguity not so abstract as to be without some connection to experience or nature. The creations are abstract, organic, three-dimensional constructions, and while the subject matter is entirely imagined, the works are executed in a highly detailed, photorealistic manner. Inspiration is drawn from a variety of natural patterns and forms, combining ideas from a number of sources rather than creating literal reconstructions. Overarching themes based on ideas from mathematics and the sciences also weave through the body of work. With a sense of true understanding placed just out of reach, the experience of the work is in a constant state of renewal and discovery.

N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Chromogenic print 41 inches x 58 inches x 1 inch, framed N/A N/A
2006.7 (Elemental Series) Kenneth A. Huff SIGGRAPH 2008: Slow Art 2008 ©2008, Kenneth A. Huff

There are many natural events I find fundamentally intriguing: for example, sparks flying from embers of a fire, waves of lightning rolling in a thunderstorm, or trees swaying in a breeze. With sustained observation of these events, I find myself in a meditative state, relaxed but also actively, mindfully engaged. I develop my work to explore similar ephemeral phenomena, to gently abstract their essences, and to create new contemplative experiences. I evoke many overlapping natural rhythms and time scales, from the darting of our eyes as we take in the world to the ever-changing rhythms of our breathing, from the breaking of waves to the changing of seasons. In this work inspired by underwater patterns of light, life, and movement, we are accompanied by a series of companions, one constant, others slowly passing as they emerge from the darkness. The exact subject matter is kept purposefully ambiguous, encouraging a broad range of associations.

N/A N/A N/A N/A Animation & Video N/A N/A N/A N/A
2007 Northeastern University Visual Music Marathon Dennis H. Miller SIGGRAPH 2007: Global Eyes 2007 ©2007, Dennis H. Miller

Visual music is an interdisciplinary artistic genre with roots dating back hundreds of years. The emergence of film and video in the 20th century allowed this genre to reach its full potential. The concept can be applied using a variety of approaches: for example, works in which the images and music are directly tied by sharing parameters or works in which the images “interpret” the music (or vice versa). A third category is pieces in which the visuals are edited in tight synchrony with cues in the music. The common theme is that the music and images are closely related in some form.

N/A N/A N/A N/A Animation & Video Animation N/A N/A N/A
2010: Jupiter Sequence Digital Productions, Inc. SIGGRAPH 1986: A Retrospective 1984 ©1984, Digital Productions, Inc. N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Animation & Video N/A 0.75 minutes (excerpt) N/A N/A
24-Hour Turnaround Mark Anderson Design SIGGRAPH 1991: Art and Design Show N/A ©, Mark Anderson Design N/A

Hardware: Apple Macintosh llcx, Linotronic L-300 (output).
Software: Quark Xpress, Adobe Illustrator, Aldus Freehand, Apple MacDraw.

N/A N/A N/A Design Poster 20 x 15 N/A N/A
24X7@PHL: Vectoring Robert Trempe SIGGRAPH 2009: Information Aesthetics Showcase 2009 ©2009, Robert Trempe

24X7ATPHL: Vectoring is an investigation into the novel usage of time-based animation software and procedural modeling as a method for visualizing time-based quantitative data via construction of a qualitative, two-dimensional rendering. Treated as an experiment that follows the most basic rules of time-lapse photography, 24XATPHL slows down and composites accumulated data on traffic (customer pickup and drop off) over seven days traffic at an international airport. The result not only notates the generations and changes in patterns, but also shows the beauty that can be found in data while unlocking the emergent potential for design. The second in the 24X7@PHL series, Vectoring is based on extraction of the resultant NURBS geometries as a methodology for understand the specific conditions of movement created by the interaction of existing architecture and users, the results of which are currently being used to develop a new speculative masterplan for the international airport.

N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung N/A N/A N/A N/A
25 Palmer John Chakeres SIGGRAPH 2000: Art Gallery 2000 ©2000, John Chakeres

I’ve always treated the content of my photographs and digital images as found objects. Photographic film’s ability to record objects with high definition and fidelity has always attracted me. With the camera, I come across a natural scene and record it with great clarity. It is, in essence, a found object or objects, if you will. With digital imaging, I have the ability to bring into the computer pieces of old artworks (history) and collected objects (touchstones), which I can then layer and collage to create new works of art with the same clarity and fidelity as my photographs. One could say it gives me the ability to appropriate or sample myself.

N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Iris Print 24 inches x 36 inches N/A digital imagery, iris print, and photography
25 – Birth and Decay Julian Konczak SIGGRAPH 2007: Global Eyes 2007 ©2007, Julian Konczak

Birth and Decay invites the audience to explore a time-sliced anatomy of landscape as it cycles through the inevitable rhythm of change. The vista is hidden, but the proximity and exploded imagery give us an intimate relationship with the environment. The birth-life-decay-death cycle is an inevitable performance that drives the movement of time on this planet. The images offer 25 instances of the same subject, the eye decoding multiplicity and diversity. My work orients itself around an examination of the visual world that surrounds us and the use of imaging technologies to explore our perceptions. I draw attention to the processes, textures, and rhythms that we take for granted and often overlook. Each work represents a personal journey either through physical space or a closer examination of the world that surrounds me. The composition of the raw material that I gather on field trips (video, stills, or sound samples) involves an evocation of an ambience, a reconstruction of the world. With a sense of simplicity and directness, I use my tools to visually re-create what I see with my eyes. Through montaging this raw material in video, interactive environments, and print, the elements of the image gain a new and distinctive meaning. The process involves working with an initial conceptual idea and then allowing the happenstance of image creation to define the content. The visual qualities of the image are paramount; the quality of light and tonal range become key factors in deciding when to press the shutter. When subject to the vagaries of weather, the works inevitably become driven by a subjective immersion within an environment. Whether creating work within walking distance of my studio, revisiting the same places throughout the seasons, or travelling across the globe, these lens-based observations are encounters with the unpredictable.

The work uses basic web technology to allow users to create their own visual fields, the emphasis of the work being to draw the audience into an exploded visual representation of a landscape. The tools are a Nikon digital camera, Adobe Photoshop CS2, and Macromedia Flash MX 2004.

N/A N/A N/A Interactive & Monitor-Based Time-sliced photographic representation of landscape created in Flash N/A N/A N/A
2A Edward Zajec SIGGRAPH 1981: Art Show ’81 1981 ©1981, Edward Zajec N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Collage 18 x 18" N/A N/A
2B Edward Zajec SIGGRAPH 1981: Art Show ’81 1981 ©1981, Edward Zajec N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Collage 18 x 18" N/A N/A
3-D Pool David Glynn SIGGRAPH 2003: CG03: Computer Graphics 2003 2003 ©2003, David Glynn

From a series called Architech, 3-D Pool is a result of playing with my digital print-outs to give the experience of moving through an underwater world. After the backdrop and the initial triangular tower were created, I had a dream to make a cylindrical pool. The blue dots on the reclining sunbather reference John Baldassari, with my own addition of the blue triangle shape. Partly inspired by the profusion of architectural renderings since the destruction of the World Trade Center, I was driven to create new forms based on more feminine shapes than the usual masculine environments. The result is a digital vision of a world where grace and beauty can be celebrated unapologetically.

N/A N/A N/A N/A 3D & Sculpture N/A 12 in x 12 in x 8 in N/A architecture and digital print
3-D SpaceTime Carrie Heeter, Pericles Gomes, and Michael Miller SIGGRAPH 1992: Art Show N/A ©, Carrie Heeter, Pericles Gomes, and Michael Miller

An interactive installation combining ENTER 3-D stereoscopic, video laserdisc, and codec technology with Mandala second person virtual reality on an Amigo computer. The live chromakeyed participant becomes part of a 3-D, stereoscopic, motion video environment. The participant experiences a curious and compelling transformation upon entering the photorealistic, interactive, virtual space seen on a life-sized screen. Initial research by Michigan State University shows that participants feel as if they are entering a different world. People report a strong desire to interact.

N/A N/A N/A N/A Installation Installation N/A N/A N/A
3-D Whitehouse Jim Dixon and Karen Schneider SIGGRAPH 1988: Art Show 1988 ©1988, Jim Dixon and Karen Schneider N/A

Hardware: Ridge, Raster Tech framebuffers
Software: P.D.I.

N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung photo pairs, stereoscopic slides 14" x 11" in. N/A N/A
3-D Zoetrope Stewart Dickson SIGGRAPH 2000: Art Gallery 2000 ©2000, Stewart Dickson

A Zoetrope is constructed by attaching 60 phases of an object in metamorphosis to a rotating wheel. The “animation” is “frozen” in space via synchronized stroboscopic lighting. The metamorphosis is a torus turning “inside-out” at three points on its surface.

Costa’s genus 1 three-ended minimal surface is topologically equivalent to a simple torus.

Thanks to collaborators at the PRISM Center, Arizona State University

Software: The Mathematica system for doing mathematics by computer (Wolfram Research, Inc.), Custom software by Stewart Dickson
Hardware: SGI, Stratasys Genisys Fused, Deposition Modeling (FDM) Machine

N/A N/A N/A 3D & Sculpture Kinetic Sculpture 48 inches x 24 inches x 36 inches N/A kinetic sculpture and zoetrope
36 Carres, 8928 Quadrilateres; Geometries Du Plaisir Vera Molnar and F. Lille SIGGRAPH 1987: Art Show N/A ©, Vera Molnar and F. Lille N/A

Hdw: BFM 186/Calcomp Plotter
Sftw: Molnart

N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Book 12" x 12" N/A N/A
360º Miguel Palma SIGGRAPH Asia 2009: Adaptation N/A ©, Miguel Palma

360º represents the concerns that are addressed in most of my work and my approach to it: the effect of global high technology on daily life and the environment (for example, daily short-distance flights to avoid enormous wastes of time).

N/A N/A N/A N/A Installation N/A N/A N/A N/A
366 Felice Hapetzeder DAC Online Exhibition 2015: Enhanced Vision - Digital Video 2013 ©2013, Felice Hapetzeder

366 is the number of confirmed drowned-at-sea deaths as a 20 meter long fishing boat with 518 people, most of them from Somalia and Eritrea, got into distress about 550 meters off the Lampedusa coastline in the Mediterranean on October 3rd 2013. The work 366 is an interpretation of the event, filmed in a bathtub with a toy coast guard boat. The sound track is made out of news flash reports on the events at Lampedusa, all reporters speaking at once and the sound fading down as the boat sinks. An allegory on how the media works in the aftermath of a disaster. Border politics of the European Union and Italy were discussed as it is thought that many more could have been rescued. But at the same time as politicians say that this should not happen again, it is actually happening every day.

Software: Final Cut Pro, ProRes HQ from Atomos Ninja, jDownloader, Magic Bullet Suite / Atomos Ninja 2
Hardware: Canon Cinema EOS C100, Macbook Pro.

N/A N/A N/A Animation & Video Video 1:24 min. N/A N/A
3D Muscle Yuta Nakayama SIGGRAPH 2005: Threading Time 2005 ©2005, Yuta Nakayama

In the 19th century, postcard-size stereoscopic photographs were very popular. 30 Muscle aims to recreate these photographs with 21st-century mobile communication technology that captures the
perspective and depth we perceive in real life.
Today, mobile phones are essential components of our daily lives. Camera phones, especially, enrich conventional audio communication by sending images. 30 Muscle is a stereoscopic moblog system that
shoots stereographic images and posts them to a weblog using two mobile phones with cameras arranged in a line. A custom controller sends a serial communication signal to synchronize exposure times
in the camera phones so they can be operated as one mobile device . This project is partially supported by CREST, JST.

N/A N/A N/A N/A Installation Two mobile phones controlled by special hardware N/A N/A N/A
3D Path and Transformations Charles A. Csuri SIGGRAPH 2006: Charles A. Csuri: Beyond Boundaries (1963-present) 1965-1966 ©1965-1966, Charles A. Csuri

Six Pages from the Artist’s Sketchbook

These sketchbook drawings were made when Csuri first started using the computer. They demonstrate ideas and issues that he was struggling with in the context of a drum plotter, a slow computer and punch cards. Csuri asked himself, “What can I do with this process or approach that would be different from my traditional work?” According to Csuri, it was a time of great speculation, and the drawings illustrate that he was thinking in terms of three-dimensional space, with some notion of stereo pairs and flying through a drawing. In the sketchbook, he comments about a three-dimensional path for an object, sine waves, and various transformations.

3D Path and Transformations

“Here, I explore a drawing in a three-dimensional space and the idea of three-dimensional paths. Leslie Miller, a Professor of Mathematics, introduced me to a broader viewpoint about transformations—transformations on the original drawing that would make the overall shape look abstracted or like a star.”
— Charles A. Csuri

N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Color pencil on paper 165 x 203 cm (65 x 80 in) N/A N/A
3D printed Pens and Wave Rings Jian-you Li SIGGRAPH Asia 2014: Digital Arts Lounge 2012-2013 ©2012-2013, Jian-you Li ©2012-2013, Jian-you Li ©2012-2013, Jian-you Li

3D printed Pen and Wave Ring are derived from the technology of applied generative design. In these works, the simple geometric algorithm systems for generating variations served as a point of departure. I then explored both automatic input methods and manual inputs, using surface analysis and random parameters. In the many variations of Wave Ring, the resulting forms represent creative works that challenge the conventional design formats of commercially produced jewelry. The entire process of input and evaluation changed my own approach to inventing form.

In making these prototypes, I used most of the available 3D printing technology, including SLS, SLA, and Titanium. I collaborated with the Additive Manufacturing Center of ITRI in Taiwan and am currently exploring the possibility of applying advanced 3D printing technology to creative design production.

Many ideas came out in this project, including the possibility of customization and the collection of big data from customers. These works combine generative design and 3D printing, and represent the potential of new access to creative design for the general public.

3D列印的筆與波浪指環是應用衍生性設計技術的產物。在這些作品中,基本的幾何演算系統是產生各種造型的起點。作者分別探索了自動的表面分析參數輸入,與人為的隨機參數輸入。各種造型變化的波浪指環,是用來質疑傳統大量生產模式的珠寶設計,所做的的創作品。這套設計流程也改變了作者在造型過程中的輸入與評估方式。

在這些原型中,作者使用了手邊可得的數種3D列印技術,包含SLS、SLA與鈦金屬,並與台灣工研院積層製造中心(Additive Manufacturing Center)合作,實驗在創造性設計製造中應用先進的3D列印技術。

在這計劃中形成許多想法,包含客製化的可能性,以及從客戶搜集資料。結合衍生性設計與3D列印的作品,所呈現的是為大眾設計創造的可能方向。

N/A N/A N/A N/A 3D & Sculpture 3D Print N/A N/A N/A
3D Printing and Jewelry Making Yael Friedman SIGGRAPH 2015: Hybrid Craft 2015 ©2015, Yael Friedman N/A

Combining 3D-printed puzzles with wearable jewelry to create puzzle rings, pieces that are not only meant to be seen but also to be touched and played.

N/A N/A N/A 3D & Sculpture N/A N/A N/A N/A
3D-woven shoe Claire Harvey, Emily Holtzman, Joy Ko, Brooks Hagan, Rundong Wu, and Steve Marschner N/A 2019 ©2019, Claire Harvey, Emily Holtzman, Joy Ko, Brooks Hagan, Rundong Wu, and Steve Marschner N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 3D & Sculpture N/A N/A N/A N/A
3DV NYIT Computer Graphics Laboratory SIGGRAPH 1986: A Retrospective 1983 ©1983, NYIT Computer Graphics Laboratory N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Animation & Video N/A 10 minutes N/A N/A
4 A 90 Mark Wilson SIGGRAPH 1990: Digital Image-Digital Cinema 1990 ©1990, Mark Wilson N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung acrylic on canvas 72 x 72" N/A N/A
4 Emotions, 8 Winds Maurice Benayoun SIGGRAPH Asia 2014: Digital Arts Lounge 2014 ©2014, Maurice Benayoun ©2014, Maurice Benayoun ©2014, Maurice Benayoun ©2014, Maurice Benayoun ©2014, Maurice Benayoun

The emotions of the world move and spread around the planet according to real-time winds, creating chance arabesques on the world map, forming meandered natural movements similar to the brushstrokes of Chinese calligraphy and ink drawing. Created through the automatic analysis of Internet data representing the emotions of 3200 of the world’s largest cities, the work understands the Internet as a de facto ‘World Nervous System’, or the harbinger of the planet’s emotional sensitivities.

The last avatar of the Mechanics of Emotions series of artworks, Emotion Winds expands the running theme of this far-reaching oeuvre, namely the relationship between ‘big data’ and what MoBen describes as ‘the human factor’ – that makes something tangibly human. The works in the series utilize techniques from economics to measure human sensitivities or feelings, looking at ways in which conventional forms of the quantification of Big Data can give credence to systems detached from, or playing with, the very tenor of human emotions. In other works in the Mechanics of Emotions series, stock market data has been directly compared to information related to real human affects. In Emotion Winds, these same human emotions are overlaid and combined with graphic representations of natural phenomena such as global wind cycles, and a poetic visualization finally emerges of Internet emotion streams from different cities across the world.

藉由自動分析代表全球3200座主要城市的網路資料,以呈現全世界的情緒即時流動,如同風向般地在世界地圖上隨機劃出阿拉伯式花紋、或中國水墨般的自然蜿蜒線條。作品所認知的網際網路,是實質意義的世界神經系統,抑或是全球情緒感知的風向球。
作為<情緒的機制>系列的最後代表,它將此廣大的主題體系擴展至巨量資料(big data)與作者稱呼為構成人類實質的「人性因素」兩者的關係中。此系列作品使用經濟學技術以量測人類感知與心情,尋找傳統資料量化可以支持人類情感根源中抽離的系統,或是進一步操弄之。這系列的其他作品中,有的則是將真實人類情感與股市資料與比較,而在此則是以自然界的物質流動現象,如全球風向循環,視覺化同一份情感資料並結合疊加,詩意地呈現出世界各地城市的情感網絡。

N/A N/A N/A Interactive & Monitor-Based Video, Internet Data N/A N/A N/A
4:3 Philip Morton SIGGRAPH 1983: Art Show 1983 ©1983, Philip Morton N/A

Hardware: Datamax UV-1 computer, Axiom printer
Software: Zgrass

N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Printer drawing 15 x 24 in. N/A printer drawing
4^16 Paul Brown SIGGRAPH 2006: Intersections N/A ©, Paul Brown

4^16 continues a program of work that I began in the 1960s. Around that time, under the influence of the European Systems Art movement, I began to think of the artwork as a generative process (for example, a series of instructions) that manifested it self in some tangible form. In 1968, I discovered computers and programming, and since 1974 these have been my primary working methodologies.

Most of my time-based work over this period has used cellular automata to drive a permutative system based on tiling symmetry. These works often have vast internal spaces (4A16 is capable of generating 4,294,967,296 images), and the cellular automaton provides a mechanism for exploring this variety in a non-linear and non-repetitive way.

The work also explores aspects of human cognition and, in particular, the ability to perceive and then interpret patterns in both structured and random visual data.

The image is composed of 16 tiles that can each be placed on one of four orientations, and the title of the work reflects this simplicity. In this implementation (and there are several; the work is essentially still in progress) the cellular automaton works on a system of “favourite” neighbors for which there is no perfect relationship.

The work was originally made using Macromedia Director, but more recently it was recreated using Processing by Casey Reas and Ben Fry. In this latter instantiation, it is a lot more flexible, and I am able to work through new ideas and variations more easily.

N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Realtime, onscreen art N/A N/A N/A
5 BP Band 4: Eclipse Nancy Macko SIGGRAPH 1994: Art and Design Show 1993 ©1993, Nancy Macko ©1993, Nancy Macko N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Cibachrome output, silkscreened plexiglass, custom lacewood frame 13 x 15.5 x 2 inches, 13 x 34 x 2 inches, 13 x 15.5 x 2 inches N/A N/A
50000 Attempts at a Circle Thomas Briggs SIGGRAPH 2005: Threading Time 2005 ©2005, Thomas Briggs

These images are discovered by exploring a variety of rule- and dynamic-based models for behavior. They exist on a continuum between randomness and order. The most interesting images are found at the brink of chaotic breakdown, or conversely, of strict mechanical repetitive structure. In either case, the ebb and flow of line density at a micro scale become fluidlike and gestural when viewed at a more macro scale. The intended engagement of the viewer with the artwork is a temporal one, where the large-scale structure of the image evaporates upon close inspection. These images represent an attempt to approach the tactile sensibility of traditional drawing, while utilizing computational methods to achieve a scale and a consistency of line that would be unobtainable by hand .

N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Ink on Paper 42 inches x 42 inches N/A N/A
7369 Gloria DeFilipps Brush SIGGRAPH 2001: n-space 1999 ©1999, Gloria DeFilipps Brush

These images are about the aura of language, the trajectories of words forming and attempting to move toward some syntactic position.

Meaning is devised, relocated, de-created.

Language slips, revealing and reviving, negotiating the soft terrain of ellipsis and substantiation.

The images in this series have their sources in photographs made with a scale model architectural camera. These sources are computer mediated and published via an archival inkjet printer.

N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Archival inkjet print 24 inches x 20 inches N/A ink jet print, language, and photography
7450 Gloria DeFilipps Brush SIGGRAPH 2001: n-space 1999 ©1999, Gloria DeFilipps Brush

These images are about the aura of language, the trajectories of words forming and attempting to move toward some syntactic position.

Meaning is devised, relocated, de-created.

Language slips, revealing and reviving, negotiating the soft terrain of ellipsis and substantiation.

The images in this series have their sources in photographs made with a scale model architectural camera. These sources are computer mediated and published via an archival inkjet printer.

N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Archival inkjet print 24 inches x 20 inches N/A ink jet print, language, and photography
7471 Gloria DeFilipps Brush SIGGRAPH 2001: n-space 1999 ©1999, Gloria DeFilipps Brush

These images are about the aura of language, the trajectories of words forming and attempting to move toward some syntactic position.

Meaning is devised, relocated, de-created.

Language slips, revealing and reviving, negotiating the soft terrain of ellipsis and substantiation.

The images in this series have their sources in photographs made with a scale model architectural camera. These sources are computer mediated and published via an archival inkjet printer.

N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Archival inkjet print 24 inches x 20 inches N/A ink jet print, language, and photography
7x7 Yuichiro Katsumoto SIGGRAPH Asia 2017: Mind-Body Dualism N/A ©, Yuichiro Katsumoto

We live surrounded by displays such as TV, smartphone, computer. These bitmap displays consist of pixels arranged in a two-dimensional plane. 7×7 was created by re-arranging these pixels multidimensionally. This display consists of 49 pixels, and these pixels do not overlap in the front, at the back, up, down, left or right. Therefore, each pixel is able to represent all six directions. By using these 49 pixels, 7×7 expresses “Iroha,” which is an old Japanese pangram that expresses one of the aesthetics called “Mujo (impermanence and ever changing).”

N/A N/A N/A N/A 3D & Sculpture N/A N/A N/A N/A
8 Bits or Less (Series) Patrick Lichty SIGGRAPH 2003: CG03: Computer Graphics 2003 2003 ©2003, Patrick Lichty ©2003, Patrick Lichty ©2003, Patrick Lichty ©2003, Patrick Lichty

The 8 Bits or Less series is an outgrowth of my ongoing work in low-res digital photography using wristwatch-based digital cameras, such as the Casio WristCam. The initial print run was a result of an installation created for the New Orleans Contemporary Art Center’s “Digital Louisiana” exhibition. The installation consisted of a single-channel video installation flanked by four large-format composites of images from the video.

To give some background on the entire body of work that centers around 8 Bits or Less, I like to consider the paintings by Gerhard Richter that took video images and usually motion blurred them into unreadability.

Conversely, the use of a gray-scale camera with a resolution of 100 pixels² challenges the artist in terms of subject and readability. This imagery questions the ongoing conversation regarding verisimilitude in digital imagery and its transparence with reality and traditional art techniques. These wristcam images refuse high resolution, they refuse color, they refuse fluid motion, and the work presents, this using technologies that were created for the increased fidelity of digital-media representation (digital video and large-format printing).

N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung N/A 18 in x 44 in N/A digital photography and digital imagery
80-11-comp-c Colette Bangert and Charles Bangert SIGGRAPH 1981: Art Show ’81 1981 ©1981, Colette Bangert and Charles Bangert N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Color ink on paper 16 x 14" N/A N/A
80-11-comp-K Colette Bangert and Charles Bangert SIGGRAPH 1981: Art Show ’81 1981 ©1981, Colette Bangert and Charles Bangert N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Color ink on paper 16 x 14" N/A N/A
8520 S.W. 27th pl v.2 Fernando Orellana SIGGRAPH 2006: Intersections N/A ©, Fernando Orellana

Free will requires that we make continuous decisions on which direc­tions our lives should take. As newborns, we learn how our bodies work, through countless unconscious decisions. As we age, this process continues, becoming more conscious and abstract. We spend our lives with this endless string of problems to solve, contemplating what action to take on each, evaluating the consequences from the decisions, and moving on to the next. The reconfigured Gemmy Corporation Dancing Hamster toys found in 8520 S.W 27th pl. symbolize this human decision-making and its inevitably limited consequences in our highly constrained existence.

Each robot found in 8520 S.W 27th pl. has the ability to walk forward or backward on a track in its house. The robots have been pro­grammed with a unique set of eight numbers. These numbers are used to determine what type of kinetic behavior the robots demon­strate. Some robots might appear to be confident in their decisions as they walk valiantly back and forth in the house, while others might exhibit what seems to be hesitation, staying in one place for a long period of time or fidgeting between decisions. In the end, the deci­sion is random, but it serves as a metaphor for the overall redundancy of our decisions. The random seed used to generate the decision is extracted from a small infrared sensor installed at one end of each house. Like our decision process, the sensor allows for external forces to influence the outcome of each choice the robot makes. As people view the piece, they unknowingly influence how the robots behave and what they decide from one moment to the next. The robots pause at every new assessment, pulsing a small light in their heads, which makes them appear to be contemplating future action.

N/A N/A N/A 3D & Sculpture Robotics and art 10' x 15' x 10' N/A N/A
90° South Alejandro Borsani SIGGRAPH 2012: In Search of the Miraculous 2010 ©2010, Alejandro Borsani ©2010, Alejandro Borsani

In 90° South, Borsani attempts to create the experience of a constantly changing landscape by building a system with an unpredictable emergent topography. For Borsani, “all the knowledge of the world is gained from our own particular points of view, or from some experience of the world without which the symbols of science would be meaningless. In order to find new possibilities, we must begin by reawakening the basic experience of the world of which words are the second-order expression. Wonderment is critical, since it allows for continued curiosity to this basic experience and thus creates the possibility for change.

Borsani’s work is an active exploration of the nature of perception and media representation in the form of sculptures, installations, and environments. With non-spectacular technologies he creates ambiguous moments between the event and the effect so the viewer may experience an instant where rational reflection, bodily experimentation, and emotional contemplation become indivisible. He is fascinated by the idea of using physical phenomena as the main materials for his installations. Borsani’s most recent work uses gravity, heat, cold, and chemical reactions to investigate how human beings deal with the inorganic, wordless nature of their environments.

Alejandro Borsani’s 90° South provides a contemplative point of view that allows the viewer to witness and be immersed in the constant evolution of a growing landscape. The work utilizes an irrigation system in conjunction with a highly absorbent material (sodium polyacrylate) to produce a slowly emerging landscape. A thin layer of the white material is placed on top of a round surface. When water reaches the surface, the sodium polyacrylate expands 300 times, producing subtle undulations. The profiles of these miniature mountains are projected onto the walls of the gallery using a flashlight attached to a rotating mechanism.

N/A N/A N/A Installation N/A N/A N/A N/A
960810_01 Kenneth A. Huff SIGGRAPH 1998: Touchware 1996 ©1996, Kenneth A. Huff

My images recreate the surreal and abstract visions of my dreams, which, along with the minute details and grand expanses of nature, serve as inspiration for my work. While creating objects that defy the laws of physics, I maintain an organic quality by following the random, yet structured beauty of nature. The shapes I use are often simple, but through a deliberate and controlled use of texture, lighting, and color, I create a unified consistency of depth, dimension, and detail.

N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Iris Giclee Print on Somerset Velvet paper 22" x 22" N/A abstract, giclee print, and iris print
970717_03 Kenneth A. Huff SIGGRAPH 1998: Touchware 1997 ©1997, Kenneth A. Huff

My images recreate the surreal and abstract visions of my dreams, which, along with the minute details and grand expanses of nature, serve as inspiration for my work. While creating objects that defy the laws of physics, I maintain an organic quality by following the random, yet structured beauty of nature. The shapes I use are often simple, but through a deliberate and controlled use of texture, lighting, and color, I create a unified consistency of depth, dimension, and detail.

N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Iris Giclee Print on Somerset Velvet paper 22" x 22" N/A abstract, giclee print, and iris print
98.13 Kenneth A. Huff SIGGRAPH 1999: technOasis 1998 ©1998, Kenneth A. Huff

The subtle patterns found in the orientation of the over two thousand blue objects were produced algorithmically by placing the objects under the influence of a number of invisible “control” objects. Those objects falling outside of the influence of the control objects have a random orientation. The orientation of the objects is accentuated by the two-tone coloring.

While all of the objects are based on the same basic geometry, the slight randomization of size and the use of 3D procedural textures give each the appearance of being unique. This pattern of similar-yet-unique detail is found throughout the natural world, and is the inspiration for much of the artist’s work.

N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Laser-imaged Photographic Paper 9 X 36 N/A algorithm, geometric, and pattern
98.3 Kenneth A. Huff SIGGRAPH 1999: technOasis 1998 ©1998, Kenneth A. Huff

In nature, patterns are commonly formed by groupings of many similar objects. A combination of procedural and static textures and colors with the random selection of basic geometry ensures that each object in this image is unique. The high level of detail imparts a level of realism, while the generally consistent direction of the flowing objects conveys a strong sense of motion. The shapes contain characteristics of vines, leaves, mushrooms, and seed pods.

N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Laser-imaged Photographic Paper 11 X 33 N/A geometric, pattern, and nature
98.4 Kenneth A. Huff SIGGRAPH 1999: technOasis 1998 ©1998, Kenneth A. Huff

Recent advances in software have allowed the artist to create a level of geometric complexity that one would normally not have the patience to create. For example, each of the ornaments capping the ends of the horizontal and vertical lines in this image was applied algorithmically, whereas previously they would have had to have been placed individually, by hand.

The combined use of procedural and static textures and colors allows detail which is discernable at the finest level and which does not contain noticeable repetition. This level of detail adds to the realism of the image and the artist’s work.

N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Laser imaged photographic paper 33 X 22 N/A algorithm and geometric
98.9 Kenneth A. Huff SIGGRAPH 1999: technOasis 1998 ©1998, Kenneth A. Huff

Strong contrast was created in this image with the stark lighting. The lighting and shadows are also one source of symmetry in this image. As in much of the natural world, the symmetry in this image is imperfect. For example, each of the floral shapes is unique, both in general geometry and in fine detail, yet the overall structure has a level of symmetry.

N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Laser-imaged Photographic Paper 34 X 25.5 N/A geometric, nature, and symmetry
98102 Madge Gleeson SIGGRAPH 1997: Ongoings 1996 ©1996, Madge Gleeson N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Laser Print/Mixed Media 22 in x 35 in N/A N/A
99.8A Kenneth A. Huff SIGGRAPH 2000: Art Gallery 2000 ©2000, Kenneth A. Huff

The penetration of the framing background objects by the stream of white forms and the subtle twisting of those forms adds to the sense of movement in this piece.

N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Laser-exposed color photographic print paper (Cymbolic Sciences LightJet) 30 inches x 30 inches N/A abstract, movement, and photographic print
A Bar at the Folies Bergère Shawn Lawson and Wafaa Bilal SIGGRAPH 2007: Global Eyes 2007 ©2007, Shawn Lawson and Wafaa Bilal

This work revisits A Bar at the Folies Bergère by Manet (1881-82) by enabling the viewer to interact with the characters in the painting. When they enter the space, viewers may notice the barmaid moving about and preparing for the evening. Viewers see themselves reflected in the mirror of the painting. The previous patron, seen in the upper right corner, leaves. The barmaid, if not already “alive,” comes to life. She refuses to offer service. If the barmaid is annoyed or tired, she will leave, only to return when everyone else leaves the space

The work is comprised of static images, live video, and movie files composited together in real time using OpenGL. Through vision-tracking algorithms, the computer determines the number and location of viewers, then updates the appropriate action for the barmaid.

N/A N/A N/A Installation Digital Media N/A N/A N/A
A Battle of Nude Men #2 Amy Bassin SIGGRAPH 1986: Painting in Light 1985 ©1985, Amy Bassin N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Installation Photograph of raster image N/A N/A N/A
A Bear of a Man Corinne Whitaker SIGGRAPH 1998: Touchware 1997 ©1997, Corinne Whitaker

BATTERED

By a fist, a weapon, a cruel threat.
Beaten down in body.
Shattered in spirit.

Just as a boxer’s fists are considered lethal weapons outside of the ring,
so the superior physical strength of men should be acknowledged and reined in.

Any man, anywhere, who threatens a woman or child with physical violence should be guilty of a crime.

Any man, anywhere, who uses his physical strength against a woman or child should be guilty of a crime.

No code to crack.
No politicospeak to decipher.
No excuses. Ever.
HURT A WOMAN. HURT A CHILD. GO TO PRISON.

No need for spin control, or independent counsels.
Just a law, so simple that it cannot be misconstrued.

HURT A WOMAN. HURT A CHILD. GO TO JAIL.

So that no woman, ever again, will ever be …

Battered.

Corinne Whitaker, 1998

 

“Touch-Me-Not”

There is a space inside the human heart that cannot be touched, that holds itself aloof and deigns to be seen. Perhaps it is the space where I stop and you begin, where the boundaries of being stand firm, the soft sculpture of our souls. In that inviolate place, we hide our terrors and our tears, close the door to inquiry, and touch only a deep sense of isolation. Somewhere in that inner space jungle lies the essence of being human, and that is the quest that these images undertake. Out of the formless void, Nature’s paintbrush yielded us. Something from nothing, beings differentiated from infinite space by boundaries of skin and bone, hair and nails. And set apart from each other by centuries of polite convention.

The soul in its insanity crouches in that wild terrain. It is the artist who dares to embark on a perilous journey into the Amazon of identity, daring to touch what we would forever hide.

Corinne Whitaker 1998

N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Digital painting on archival watercolor paper, Iris print 20" x 20" N/A digital painting, iris print, and series
A Bird in Hand Copper Frances Giloth SIGGRAPH 1983: Art Show 1983 ©1983, Copper Frances Giloth N/A

Hardware: Datamax UV-1 computer, Hewlett-Packard 7580-A plotter
Software: Zgrass, UV-1 Paint System

N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung plotter drawing 25 1/2 x 17 1/2 in. N/A plotter drawing
A Brief History Sheri Wills SIGGRAPH 1994: Art and Design Show 1994 ©1994, Sheri Wills ©1994, Sheri Wills ©1994, Sheri Wills ©1994, Sheri Wills ©1994, Sheri Wills N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Color print (5 images printed as one panel) 4 x 36 inches N/A N/A
A Brief Visual History of Computer Graphics Sonja Ellingson SIGGRAPH 1986: A Retrospective 1963-72 ©1963-72, Sonja Ellingson N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Animation & Video N/A 4.25 minutes N/A N/A
A Certain Uncertainty Lynn Pocock SIGGRAPH 1992: Art Show N/A ©, Lynn Pocock N/A

Hardware: Amiga 500
Software: Artist’s personal software

N/A N/A N/A Animation & Video N/A 3:40 N/A N/A
A Child's Face Charles A. Csuri SIGGRAPH 2006: Charles A. Csuri: Beyond Boundaries (1963-present) 1989 ©1989, Charles A. Csuri N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Unix environment, LightJet on paper with laminate 76 x 102 cm (30 x 40 in) N/A N/A
A Computer Generated Ballet A. Michael Noll SIGGRAPH 1986: A Retrospective 1964 ©1964, A. Michael Noll N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Animation & Video N/A 2.5 minutes N/A N/A
A Decade of Innovation IBM San Jose Design Center SIGGRAPH 1991: Art and Design Show N/A ©, IBM San Jose Design Center N/A

Hardware: IBM Main Frame/Host System.
Software: IBM CADAM, CATIA, NC Machining.

N/A N/A N/A 3D & Sculpture and Design Three-dimensional award 27.4 cm x 27.4 cm N/A N/A
A Desert Network: Lake Tahoe to Pyramid Lake Peter Whittenberger DAC Online Exhibition 2018: The Urgency of Reality in a Hyper-Connected World N/A ©, Peter Whittenberger ©, Peter Whittenberger ©, Peter Whittenberger

A Desert Network: Lake Tahoe to Pyramid Lake uses the hydrologic cycle of the Great Basin to consider the critical influence of water on all landscapes. Specifically, the work focuses on the water way of Lake Tahoe to Pyramid Lake, through the Truckee River. I see this hydrologic cycle as a metaphorical local network that supports all native life, regardless of time or species. The water serves as the data stream that supports the local network. I’m using the metaphor of a local network and a hydrologic cycle to represent the interconnected nature of water to all life.

N/A N/A N/A N/A Animation & Video N/A N/A http://www.peterwhittenberger.com/desertNetwork.html N/A
A Digital Frottage HO SIGGRAPH 1998: Touchware 1997 ©1997, HO

Moving from digital output to traditional art media and permanent, pleasing output raises several issues. In this piece, a homemade, three-axis milling machine and a plotter were used to generate the third depth. With a cone-shaped bit, the depth was translated into line width, then a plane was defined, covering a fractal line, and attached to a depth/width pattern, which is repeated along its course.

This was all done in a few lines of code. Fractals can be beautiful, yet simple.

The resulting coordinates, translated into step-motor input, direct the bit into the maple in one single path from start to end – an elegant process, adapted to the tools at hand. The resulting carved woodblock can be the source of many pleasing experiments.

This piece is but one of many possibilities: a frottage or rubbing, as done by petrographs, archeologists, Chinese scholars, and artists. Max Ernst in particular was fond of the medium: “Histoires Naturelles.” The graphite lead rubbed on the sheet laid over the block marks only where wood was not removed.

N/A N/A N/A N/A 2D & Wall-Hung Rubbing over a digitally produced wood block: graphite on handmade Japanese paper 7.75" x 7.75" N/A fractals and pattern
A Digital Window for Watching Snow Scenes Qinglian Guo SIGGRAPH 2007: Global Eyes 2007 ©2007, Qinglian Guo

This work was inspired by the traditional Japanese Yukimi Syoji screen commonly used in rural houses. Yukimi means watching a snow scene, and Syoji means paper door. On a Yukimi Syoji, paper is replaced by transparent glass so people can view snow scenes. I am deeply impressed with this enjoyable way of spending time. When I started producing this installation, the first thing I did was make a covering box like a Yukimi Shoji to hide computer devices. Next, I created three types of snow scenes by programming with OpenGL and C++. I created snowflakes in four-dimensional hexagons, letting them move and rotate in four-dimensional space, and projected the snow scene to three-dimensions. Second, I created a scene of snowflakes in the form of alphabets. I set a slow falling speed so that people could read the alphabets and even solve a word puzzle. Third, I made a snow scene in which everything (for example, snowflakes, trees, and houses) was shown in wireframe. These floating wireframe snowflakes present a novel and particular sense. In addition, I created a virtual cloudy glass and put it in front of the snow scene. When people touch the panel and move their fingers, a transparent stroke appears on the virtual glass. Through the stroke, people can see the falling snowflakes. With time, the stroke disappears, and the glass becomes cloudy again.

A series of 3D animations of snow scenes was created based on an original design by programming and coding with Open3D and C++. Snowflakes can be formed in alphabets, polyhedrons, or four-dimensional hexagons. All of them are 3D modeled, based on calculated
coordinates, and composed of semi-transparent polygons. Snowflake movement is controllable through parameters such as falling speed, floating vectors, and rotations.

N/A N/A Installation N/A N/A N/A N/A
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