Artworks Data Table


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Title Artist Name Exhibition Creation Year Image Artist Statement Technical Info Process Info Collaborators Sponsors Category Medium Size Website Keywords
  • Messiah
  • (art)n Laboratory, Randy Johnson, Daniel J. Sandin, Ellen Sandor, and Jim Zanzi
  • SIGGRAPH 1988: Art Show
  • 1987
  • 1988 ArtN Messiah
  • Hardware: IBM 3081, VAX 11|780, AT&T 6300+, Targa 32
    Software: RT|1, proprietary ray tracing

  • The PHSCologram term, coined in 1983, by Ellen Sandor, is an acronym for photography, holography, sculpture and computer graphics (pronounced skol-o-gram). The PHSCologram medium inspired new ideas in multimedia circles, and influenced three decades of (art)n’s collaborative portfolio, unsurpassed for its prolific range of content and innovation in digital photography.

  • 3D & Sculpture
  • phscologram
  • 72" x 97" in.
  • Castañuellas, Comunicación, Energia
  • (art)n Laboratory
  • SIGGRAPH 1992: Art Show
  • 1992
  • 1992 (Art)n Labratory Castanellas, Comunicacion Energia
  • The PHSCologram term, coined in 1983, by Ellen Sandor, is an acronym for photography, holography, sculpture and computer graphics (pronounced skol-o-gram). The PHSCologram medium inspired new ideas in multimedia circles, and influenced three decades of (art)n’s collaborative portfolio, unsurpassed for its prolific range of content and innovation in digital photography.

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • PHSColograms (barrier-strip autostereograms)
  • 30.5 x 30.5" each
  • The Equation of Terror (left panel: Chemical Terror)
  • (art)n Laboratory
  • SIGGRAPH 1991: Art and Design Show
  • 1991
  • Hardware: AT & T Pixel Machine, SUN Ill, SUN IV, RAYLIB, PICLIB.
    Software: Written by the artists.

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Stealth Negative PHS Cologram
  • 24 x 130
  • Robert Mapplethorpe/The Nineties
  • (art)n Laboratory
  • SIGGRAPH 1990: Digital Image-Digital Cinema
  • 1990
  • 1990 (ART) Labratory Robert Mapplethorpe The Nineties
  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • barrier-strip autostereograms in sculpture
  • 30 x 100 x 80"
  • Townhouse Revisited
  • (art)n Laboratory
  • SIGGRAPH 2000: Art Gallery
  • 1999
  • The (art)n work presented at SIGGRAPH 2000 is entitled Townhouse Revisited, 1999. This PHSCologram and interactive audio sculpture addresses issues of the body, public space, and touch in the architecture of virtual reality. The work was created in response to such questions as: If hard matter and gravity offer no impediment in virtual reality, what then will meeting, working, and playing spaces look like there? How might form, substance, and light evolve as we navigate through virtual structures? Would the body’s passage behind a monitor’s glass raise any layered echoes of sound? How would sound behave in a virtual space with no true surfaces to bounce off of – only image planes? Would sound bouncing off image planes be affected spatially by the digital code that makes up the structure of the image?

  • 3D & Sculpture and Interactive & Monitor-Based
  • Vintage PHSCologram sculpture
  • 25 inches x 40 inches x 10 inches
  • installation, interactive, sound, and virtual reality
  • Papers Please
  • 3909 LLC
  • DAC Online Exhibition 2014: Aesthetics of Gameplay
  • DAC2014 3909 LLC: Papers Please 1
  • Congratulations. The October labor lottery is complete. Your name was pulled. For immediate placement, report to the The Ministry of Admission at Grestin Border Checkpoint. An apartment will be provided for you and your family in East Grestin. Expect a Class-8 dwelling. Glory to Arstotzka.

    The communist state of Arstotzka has just ended a 6-year war with neighboring Kolechia and reclaimed its rightful half of the border town, Grestin. Your job as immigration inspector is to control the flow of people entering the Arstotzkan side of Grestin from Kolechia. Among the throngs of immigrants and visitors looking for work are hidden smugglers, spies, and terrorists. Using only the documents provided by travelers and the Ministry of Admission’s primitive inspect, search, and fingerprint systems you must decide who can enter Arstotzka and who will be turned away or arrested.

  • Interactive & Monitor-Based
  • http://papersplea.se/
  • The Impermanence Agent
  • Noah Wardrip-Fruin, A. C. Chapman, Brion Moss, and Duane Whitehurst
  • SIGGRAPH 2000: Art Gallery
  • 2000
  • The story of hypermedia, in which the Web is a recent chapter, begins with a vision of transforming the brain’s associative connections into media (media that can be infinitely duplicated and easily shared), creating pathways of thought in a form that will not fade with memory. In recent years, hypermedia has begun to permeate our lives. But it is not as we dreamed: constantly growing, with nothing lost, only showing what we wish to see. Instead, “Not Found” is a nearly daily message. The story of software agents begins with the idea of a “soft robot” capable of carrying out goal-oriented tasks while requesting and receiving advice in human terms. In recent years, a much narrower marketing fantasy of the agent has emerged (with a relationship to actual agent technologies as tenuous as Robbie the Robot’s relationship to factory robots), and it grows despite failures such as Microsoft Bob. Now we often see agents as anthropomorphized, self-customizing virtual servants designed for a single task: to be a pleasing interface to a world of information that does not please us.

    The Web disappoints us with its too-perfect reflection of our ambivalent relationships with impermanence and openness: dynamic and unstable, diverse and overwhelming. In response, some Web businesses are marketing fantasies of agents that will find for us only the information we desire and shelter us from chance encounters with unpleasant content and broken links.

    The Impermanence Agent is a different response. It interacts with users as a Web-browser window. The Agent tells a personal story, a story of impermanence. The Agent is meant to be experienced peripherally, over time, not “visited.” It tracks the user’s Web browsing, makes copies of the texts and images the user views, and then customizes its story by incorporating this material. The Agent customizes until none of its original story is left.

  • Internet Art
  • Narrative alteration and reaction to Web browsing
  • connection, hypermedia, and time
  • A Computer Generated Ballet
  • A. Michael Noll
  • SIGGRAPH 1986: A Retrospective
  • 1964
  • Animation & Video
  • 2.5 minutes
  • Computer Composition with Lines
  • A. Michael Noll
  • SIGGRAPH 1986: A Retrospective
  • 1964
  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Ninety computer-generated sinusoids with linearly increasing period
  • A. Michael Noll
  • SIGGRAPH 1986: A Retrospective
  • 1965
  • 1965 Noll Ninety Computer-Generated Sinusoids
  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Photograph of plotter drawing
  • 8.5 X 11"
  • Rotating Four-Dimensional Hyperobject
  • A. Michael Noll
  • SIGGRAPH 1986: A Retrospective
  • 1964
  • Animation & Video
  • 1 minute (excerpt)
  • Flight Patterns
  • Aaron Koblin
  • SIGGRAPH Asia 2009: Adaptation
  • Koblin: Flight Patterns
  • Data from the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration processed to create animations of flight traffic patterns and density.
    This work was originally developed as a series of experiments for the project Celestial Mechanics by colleagues Scott Hessels and Gabriel Dunne at the University of California, Los Angeles.

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • This Exquisite Forest
  • Aaron Koblin
  • SIGGRAPH 2013: XYZN: Scale
  • 2013
  • Conceived by Chris Milk and Aaron Koblin and produced by Tate Modern and Google, This Exquisite Forest was inspired by the surrealist game “exquisite corpse” and its idea of collaborative creation. The project lets users create short animations that build off one another as they explore specific themes. The result is a collection of branching narratives resembling trees to which anyone may contribute. The project lives online and as a physical installation at the Tate Modern (through June 2013). At the museum, visitors can explore the project as a life-sized projection and contribute animations using high-end digital drawing tablets.

    Our work is about exploring the line between a pre-determined experience and an open one. We’re interested in thinking about how much freedom the viewer should have within the artwork. For example, in This Exquisite Forest, we give artists an open canvas to create any animation they like, but also the power to moderate and set rules for how that animation may evolve. Likewise, with The johnny Cash Project, participants are given a single frame as a template, but then they are free to interpret that frame in any way they choose.

    We have tried a similar approach with interactive film. In The Wilderness Downtown, we let viewers change the experience by focusing it around their childhood homes using Google Maps and Street View. And with our fourth project, Three Dreams of Black, viewers can control the camera and create 3D sculptures that persist in the film for everyone to see.

    New advances in web-browser technology have been at the core of each project. The web is intrinsically a great example of the SIGGRAPH 2013 Art Gallery theme. This Exquisite Forest is built around scale; it requires the participation of thousands of people to fulfill its goal of creating an evolving forest of animations.

  • Interactive & Monitor-Based
  • SEEDIS
  • Aaron Marcus and Associates, Aaron Marcus, and Michael Arent
  • SIGGRAPH 1984: CAD Show
  • 1984 Marcus, Arent: SEEDIS 1
  • SEEDIS has an enormous database containing population and geographical statistics that are combined in answer to specific queries. This output, or outerface, is often most logically expressed by graphs, maps, charts or other diagrams.

    Designers worked in collaboration with computer programmers to create prototypical solutions to the problem of presenting these graphic outerfaces. The problem required designers to find ways to control the semi-automatic generation of information. The problem also required that the solutions be aesthetically pleasing, that the system’s capabilities be fully used, and that the designs meet the communication needs of the typical user.

  • Equipment:
    DEC VAX 11/780
    terminals – Ramtek 9400, Tektronix 4027, ADM-3, Dec VT100, Tektronix 4104, Autologic APS micro 5; hardcopy – Xerox 9700, Versatec V-80, Tektronix 5218 printers

    Software:
    Primarily in Fortran and C, DEC VMS operating system

  • Publishing and Print

    Publishing and print have been synonymous since the invention of moveable type. Computers and graphics first entered publishing as production tools. As digital communication media replaces print, traditional graphic design principles are being modified and applied to the design and presentation of such things as computer interfaces and programs. High-density image storage devices such as video disk, provide the capability to archive, access and traverse massive amounts of graphic and textual information. With these and other tools in place, the design of information for dynamic, two-way communication between a user and computer can result.

  • Design and Interactive & Monitor-Based
  • data
  • Seeing C
  • Aaron Marcus, Michael Arent, and Andrea Pettigrew
  • SIGGRAPH 1984: CAD Show
  • Image Not Available
  • Equipment:
    Autologic APS micro 5
    Low resolution and high resolution terminals
    Laser printer/plotters

    Software:
    C, Unix

  • Ronald Baecker, Paul Breslin, John Jackson, Allen McIntosh, and Christopher Sturgess
  • Design
  • Metaform
  • Aaron Marcus, Michael Arent, and Richard Mehl
  • SIGGRAPH 1984: CAD Show
  • Image Not Available
  • Equipment:
    Three Rivers Perq-1 computer, 16-bit 68000 – based b&w high resolution display Xerox 9700 laser printer

    Software:
    Proprietary software in PASCAL, on Three Rivers operating system

  • Design
  • Evolving Gravity
  • Aaron Marcus
  • SIGGRAPH 1981: Art Show ’81
  • 1981
  • Marcus: Evolving Gravity
  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Serigraph
  • 32 x 24"
  • Hieroglyphs
  • Aaron Marcus
  • SIGGRAPH 1986: A Retrospective
  • 1978
  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Plotter
  • 12 x 12 in
  • Lightbuttons: Rising Suns
  • Aaron Marcus
  • SIGGRAPH 1986: A Retrospective
  • 1967
  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Photograph of vector image
  • 30 x 30"
  • Noise Barrier
  • Aaron Marcus
  • SIGGRAPH 1981: Art Show ’81
  • 1981
  • Marcus: Noise Barrier
  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Serigraph
  • 32 x 24"
  • Radioactive Jukebox
  • Aaron Marcus
  • SIGGRAPH 1986: A Retrospective
  • 1972-4
  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Serigraph
  • 18 x 15"
  • The Mischief of Created Things
  • Aaron Oldenburg
  • SIGGRAPH 2008: Slow Art
  • 2008
  • 2008 Aaron Oldenburg Mischief of Created Things
  • The purpose of The Mischief of Created Things is to create an interactive environmental narrative dealing with new images of West Africa and philosophies of game design. The content is based on my two years as a development worker in Mali. The imagery is intended to inspire players to find the magic in the mundane, and it references a hybrid of traditional Malian and Western culture overlapping between magic and technology.

    My process involved creation of a three-dimensional environment in Flash, which the player can explore non-linearly. The environment includes characters, with whom players converse; the conversations are based on a fluid navigation system similar to the environment’s exterior navigation. Stories are based on my diary entries and letters home, and were chosen for their personal, surprising, and multi-layered nature.

    Rather than use traditional game-design methods, I chose to start with narrative and imagery and create the game structure from them. During play, the user discovers narratives that build on one another throughout the course of the experience. The player uses these to form a meaningful picture of the environment as a whole. The order of events changes each player’s interpretation, since the experience of certain events directly influences the sequence of subsequent events. The surprising and non-sequitur nature of the narrative makes the game characters and environment seem more real.

  • Interactive & Monitor-Based
  • A Song for Africa
  • Acha Debela
  • SIGGRAPH 1990: Digital Image-Digital Cinema
  • 1990
  • 1990 Debela A Song for Africa
  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • photograph
  • 20 x 30"
  • Finding Love
  • Active Theory
  • DAC Online Exhibition 2017: Immersive Expressions: Virtual Reality on the Web
  • 2017
  • Finding Love is a fully interactive, Virtual Reality story that transforms emotions into art. Moving through five distinct chapters, ones experiences a journey made from abstract visuals and sounds. In the story, the user’s avatar is a gem that is paired with another gem of a different color and shape.
    When a user begins their experience they are matched to another user over a WebSocket connection to a matching server. When a match is made, the two users connect directly to each other over WebRTC and exchange information such as location and input data in order to see the other user’s motion reflected in the partner gem. At the end of the experience, the user learns that the other gem was another user sharing the experience at the same time and their approximate location is revealed.
    The makers state “Our desire in this project, as well as many others, is to connect people in simple ways that make a meaningful impression. The other gem’s movements in the experience are directly impacted by the partner’s input whether desktop, mobile, or VR.”
  • Augmented Reality/Virtual Reality
  • WebVR
  • LEM film
  • Adage Graphics
  • SIGGRAPH 1986: A Retrospective
  • 1967
  • Image Not Available
  • Animation & Video
  • 1.25 minutes
  • The River
  • Rui Yi Mui, Adam Aw, Zac Ong, Mithru Vigneshwara, Jacky Boen, Benjamin Low, and Andreas Schlegel
  • SIGGRAPH Asia 2012: Echo
  • 2012 Mui The River
  • In The River, sound samples recorded along the Singapore River are interpreted and visualized into the form of light by a custom made program. With the use of light representing life along the Singapore River, this artwork provides a new perspective of form and space. Digital and synthetic elements of light and acrylic echoes the organic elements of sounds and human activities within the environment of the river.

  • Installation and Sound Art
  • Sound Visualization Installation
  • S U T U R E
  • Adam Chapman
  • SIGGRAPH 1999: technOasis
  • Internet Art
  • Website
  • http://www.theadm.com/suture.html
  • computer graphics, interactive, and website
  • Spacequatica
  • Adam Hoyle, Ed Cookson, Edd Dawson-Taylor, Lewis Sykes, and Olly Venning
  • SIGGRAPH 2008: Slow Art
  • 2008
  • 2008 Ed Cookson Spacequatica
  • The Sancho Plan creates real-time audio/visual experiences for modern audiences. Through our live shows and installations, we explore custom-built, interactive technologies that fuse film and animation, sound and music, interaction design and gaming, and live performance into unified works of immersive public entertainment. Visually and sonically, Spacequatica takes us on a descent through a musical ocean. Beginning near the surface, where phasing xylophones interact with schools of small exotic creatures, the animation explores deeper waters populated by robotic sharks, and the depths, where all that can be observed is a self-illuminating species occasionally blinking out of the darkness.

  • Animation & Video
  • Saturation
  • Adam Laskowitz and Daniel Barry
  • SIGGRAPH 2012: In Search of the Miraculous
  • 2011
  • Saturation is an installation that highlights the abundance of wireless signals occupying the electromagnetic spectrum. The work indexes the FM radio spectrum to reveal the density of the invisible communications infrastructure saturating the environment and our bodies.

  • The work is installed in the form of an enormous chandelier; a set of open aluminum boxes housing FM radios are strung together and hung from the center of the ceiling. At rest, while concealed within their enclosures, the radio receivers output an ocean of static. Once exposed, the radios each connect to a different station, filling the space with a cacophony of noise. This process reveals a densely populated, dynamic array of electromagnetic fields that, while intangible, constantly permeate our bodies and environment.

  • The aluminum enclosures act as Faraday Cages, preventing the radios from receiving a signal. Each enclosure’s aggregation and directionality is determined through the installation’s spatial orientation to the source of the broadcast, disrupting the signal’s reception, and creating a field of static noise. Because the body absorbs electromagnetic signals, the radios may connect to the signal when a human hand is within close proximity of the radio inside the enclosure. This engagement with the installation exposes a realization of the effects that bodies and wireless signals impose upon one another. While this experience remains confined to a single broadcast, the multitude of signals can be experienced through simultaneously releasing each of the radios with a single pulley actuation. This releases an eruption of sounds, which exposes the dense saturation of the environment and reveals the wonderment of experiencing the multiplicity of signal presence at any given moment.

  • Installation
  • The Eye of the Pilot
  • Addictive TV
  • SIGGRAPH 2006: Electronically Mediated Performances
  • 2006 Addictive TV The Eye of the Pilot
  • The visual and musical journey takes the audience to places such as Karachi, Ivory Coast, Saigon, Tahiti, and San Francisco, capturing the romantic innocence of the world at a time when traveling with a home movie camera was still highly unusual. The performance gives a rare glimpse into the beginnings of a world that we all now take for granted, where recording of images and international travel are common place.

    Interwoven with stylized interviews with pilot Raymond Lamy, the original footage is re-worked with graphics to a new and original soundtrack by Addictive TV, which features live guitar from French artist Alejandro de Valera, who specializes in composing for and playing his rare, custom-built fretless guitars.

    The Eye of the Pilot was supported by the Paris arts board Arcadi as part of their experimental multimedia grants. It has been performed at several venues, including the Pompidou Centre in Paris, the National Theatre in London, and The Cologne Museum of Applied Arts.

  • The Eye of the Pilot can be described as a live cinema performance, as both the audio and visuals are performed live, which is possible only with thanks to recent developments in audio/visual performanet technology. Addictive TV use professional DVD turntables (the DVJ: X1), which they helped test and launch for Pioneer a few years ago.

    AV Performance Software: VJammPro, alongside Ableton Live audio software and live guitars.

  • Performance
  • Live multimedia perfomance
  • Rave Safe
  • Adem Jaffers and Jeff Jaffers
  • SIGGRAPH 1994: Art and Design Show
  • 1994
  • 1994 Jaffers Rave
  • HARDWARE/SOFTWARE
    Amiga, Opalpaint, Dpaint, Morphplus, Imagine, Digiview

  • Emerald Films and Tracy Walsh
  • Animation & Video
  • Animation
  • 2:30 minutes
  • the appearance of cerebration
  • Adi Hoesle
  • SIGGRAPH 2004: Synaesthesia
  • 2004
  • Data from measurements of brain waves are transformed into a wallpaper pattern and a three-dimensional sculpture. The sensory organs that are stimulated and inspired by looking at art and associated cerebral events are performing as artwork themselves. The sum of senses plus awareness equals the true sense. This would be defined as “synesthetik.” Wallpaper: The wallpaper project literally uses the “neuronal pattern” as a pair of terms and transforms them in a visualized context (perception). A viewer was asked to look at the famous painting “Who is afraid of red, blue and yellow” by Barnett Newmann in the Staatsgalerie in Stuttgart, Germany, and the viewer’s cerebral
    responses (wave patterns) were transformed into paper wall strips. Brain sculpture: For the “brain sculpture,” the wave patterns were milled in a precise landscape-like sculpture of wood or plastic. Concept: Electroencephalography (EEG) allows measurement of brain activities in real time. Cerebral activities are defined as neuronal patterns and interpreted as perception. In general, more activity is found in the right hemisphere when the subject is being creative. And cerebral activity increases during perception. In this work, EEG measurements allow the observer to perceive brain activity during perception of an aesthetic event. Summary: EEG technology can reveal perceptive activities within the brain of the artist as well as in the brain of the recipient. Thus mental processes that are triggered during artistic events are not limited to the brain’s interior, but may also be reflected in a two-dimensional “picture” or “in” a three-dimensional sculpture.

  • The so-called “human factor” is presented opposite to an increasingly digitized and herewith dematerialized society of information. The binary code reflects the cerebral procedures: 0 and 1 stand for: will a stimulus be transmitted: yes or no? The result is defined as network. When the different centers, from the retina up to the brain, simultaneously interact in a network, we are able to see the appearance of cerebration subjects the interface between hardware and software, and between the cerebral and spiritual processes, to a combination of PC and EEG and reflects interior processes. The reflection is an aesthetic product manufactured with modern procedures (digital print, computer-assisted CNC-milling machine). EEG: EEGs are recorded with a Medtronic Ambulatory. The recorded signal is in the frequency range of 1 -15 Hz. Customized software, developed by Frieder Weiss, analyzes the wave pattern in real time and transforms it into a landscape-like picture by a Fast Fourier Transformation. Print: With digital print procedures, the cerebral signals can be processed.
    Plastic Sculpture: The recorded data are transformed into IGES or DXF files for computer assisted machine systems and precisely rendered by a five-axle-driven CNC-milling machne. In all procedures, there is a permanent feedback mechanism: This area of technical awareness has the goal to detect people (humans) in the environment of computers, to identify them, and to investigate significant measurements. The goal of this method/technique is to investigate and interpret human actions through art. When processing the measured results of cerebral activities, the technique itself is being used as “cerebral activities” and will influence the result in the same way as the aesthetic result. This application, of course, doesn’t require a certain cerebral activity, but includes it as an integral. “Interface as Interface in the sense of bio-aesthetic feedback.”

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Wallpaper wood
  • wallpaper 1.5 meters x 3.5 meters sculpture 0.2 meters x 0.3 meters x 0.1 meters
  • 1991 Type Calendar
  • Adobe System Marketing Communications
  • SIGGRAPH 1991: Art and Design Show
  • 1991
  • Hardware: Apple Macintosh II, Linotronic 300 (output).
    Software: Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Type Library.

  • Design
  • Calendar
  • 11 x 8.5
  • Adobe Systems Incorporated 1989 Annual Report
  • Adobe System Marketing Communications
  • SIGGRAPH 1991: Art and Design Show
  • 1989
  • Hardware: Apple Macintosh II.
    Software: Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Patterns and Textures, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Separator, Aldus PageMaker.

  • Design
  • Annual Report
  • 11 x 8.5
  • Faces
  • Adrian Goya
  • SIGGRAPH 2007: Global Eyes
  • 2007
  • FACES is an interactive video installation that explores the otherness contained in each one of us. The Other, so often an anonymous and distant being, is carried inside me in a way. Differences between humans are merely a product of chance. Too easily, we distance ourselves from the suffering of people, ignoring the tragedies of mankind, ears deaf to the pain of the Other. We forget that the sufferers could be “us” or someone we know, someone with a face. Levinas said that being in a face-to-face relationship with the Other makes it impossible to kill him. He also considered that his relationship with the Other as neighbor gave meaning to his relations with all the others. A neighbor relationship requires one to know the Other’s face. Every day, we look in a mirror and it’s always the same face, the “Self.” This installation tries to briefly change that everyday experience. When looking into the mirror, the viewer discovers other faces watching him, faces that get mixed-up between them and the viewer’s reflected image. The Self encounters itself face-to-face with the Other, previously a stranger. Inside the viewer’s own reflected image lies a small, ever-changing sample of the Infinite Otherness.

  • Motion detection registers the viewer looking into the mirror and records a small loop that is maintained in a database. As viewers watch their reflections in the mirror, their own images are video-projected over his reflection with similar dimensions and with a small delay. As viewers move around in front of the mirror, previously recorded loops are projected inside their reflections. The projected video loops are contained inside the reflected mirror-image by a series of masks. With a series of motion blurs and masks, the viewers’ movements determine the discovery of new faces. FACES was entirely programmed in Pd & GEM. Completion of this project was made possible by the Centro Multimedia, Centro Nacional de las Artes, México DF, México.

  • Installation
  • Solace and Perpetuity
  • Adrianne Wortzel
  • DAC Online Exhibition 2015: Altered Books - Digital Interventions
  • 2015
  • “SOLACE AND PERPETUITY, a life story,” is an algorithmically rendered autobiography of the artist. Like a medieval Book of Hours, many genres are represented: diary entries, dreams, academic papers, fictive prose, poetry, plays, and video and installation scripts. These were numbered and fragmented into their indigenous paragraphs, which were subjected to a scrambling algorithm. Scrambling provides a kaleidoscopic reading of potentially 100’s of 1000’s of possibilities. The artist’s character seeps through a text where every paragraph is a subtext. Published by Weil Books in 2015. Collector’s edition available through the artist, individual copies at Lulu.com.

  • Artist Book
  • Editions are published in sets of 3 objects, the readable book, a folded book as an art object, and a linen-wrapped one as a "mummified" archival object
  • High-Speed Printer
  • Advanced Matrix Technologies
  • SIGGRAPH 1984: CAD Show
  • 1984 Advanced Matrix Technologies: High-Speed Printer
  • Individual components or subsystems usually are defined at different “layers” of the database, so the designer can view any number of them at once. The different colors of this drawing of a high-speed computer printer represent different layers. Because the lid was defined on a separate layer, the designer was able to move it though its range of motion to ensure that no components interfered with its movement. For clarity, the lid was drawn in a different color for each position in the sequence shown.

  • Equipment:
    McAuto Unigraphics
    CAD/CAM System

  • Unlimited Detail and Variation

    Unlike conventional design media, such as paper and pencil, a computer’s representation of an object can incorporate every conceivable detail. The amount of detail that a database can contain is virtually infinite, limited only by the available data storage medium (usually magnetic tape or disk). Being able to easily manipulate the database allows designers to rotate, twist, bend, and make other modifications very quickly.

  • I.D. Two, Inc., Stephen Hobson, William Moggridge, and Eric May
  • Design
  • layers and line drawing
  • Landscape
  • Afanassy Pud
  • SIGGRAPH 2005: Threading Time
  • 2005
  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Digital art
  • 24 inches x 18 inches
  • The Garden of Earthly Delights
  • Agata Bolska
  • SIGGRAPH 1993: Machine Culture
  • Inspired by the 15th century painting by Hieronymus Bosch, The Garden of Earthly (Delights) is a screen-based, interactive installation focused on ideas related to the television medium and the place it occupies in modern Western culture. Central to the piece is the “Garden” animation, whose symbolic characters represent various modern passions and delights, embodied in the television programs.  The piece is conceived as a comment on and paraphrase of television.  Like TV it is meant to inconspicuously control the users’ choices, imposing on them specific decisions.  By selecting respective symbols from one of various “Garden” animations, the users metaphorically fall prey to the flaws of human nature, as manifested in Bosch’s work.  Seduced by the “delights,” the users become victims of the mediamatic illusion of reality.

    The phantasmagoric creatures depicted in the Bosch’s painting are entangled in surreal affairs with each other and with their own demons, conjured out of the fantasies and beliefs howling in the minds of the artist’s contemporaries.  Here, they are replaced by Western demons, whose faces flash through the television channels.  In the modern world TV has filled the space vacated by religion, which in 15th century Europe served to link and unify many aspects of social life.  Like Bosch’s figures, we are now cringing under the burden of hellish visions brought forth by television daily news and horror movies, instead of Rambos and preachers.  Messages of violence smoothly intersected by omnipresent commercials and pandering advertisements saturate the viewers’ minds.  The sarcasm and surrealism of Bosch’s painting reflect in the sleek surface of the TV screen. Deployed in from to a favorite chair or couch, TV embodies our beliefs and fears, and yet serves them with restrained dramatism–after all it is just the screen…Commodity advertisements, type-casting, food commercials–all of these strive to fill that void in viewers’ consciousness that craves for indulgence.  These are modern representations of greed and vanity.

    Just as at home, sitting comforting in front of the TV, the users of The Garden of Earthly Delights find themselves poised between the reality of an old armchair, flanked by the “Vanity Panel” and the computer screen.  The panel, covered with familiar wallpaper patterns, conceals the equipment; all the users see is the screen, the keyboard, and the mouse–the three elements that make the interaction possible.  The repetitive, teasing and numbing sound, present throughout the piece but changing with each new selection, parallels the character of television channels.  While the stills and animations that appear in response to the users’ selections are suggestive of TV, their palette subdued yet always slightly different with each entry, the messages and menus take the form of gothic-style notes characteristic of Bosch’s time and, in some cases, quoting from the artist’s writings.

    The participants’ past and current responses are analyzed and stored in the seven concurrent databases.  The flow of the action is based on the users’ choices and is different for each participant, depending upon the performance.  The underlying database allows alteration of the available imagery and sound in the run time, while the participants are traversing through the “Garden’s” paths, thus creating the possibility of numerous selections–of animations, stills and sounds–and adaptations to individual explorations.

  • Installation and Interactive & Monitor-Based
  • Handsight
  • Agnes Hegedüs
  • SIGGRAPH 1993: Machine Culture
  • This work emphasizes aspects of virtuality, such as telepresence and disembodiment/re-embodiment of the senses. Handsight also affects a transverse relation between the virtual and the real by correlating a specific physical object with respect to its virtual representation. This is done within the circumference of a visual environment where the imagery becomes a spherical anamorphoses that embodies an augmented field of view- an ‘endoscopic eye.’ The thematic structure of this work is implied as an exteriorized phenomenological projection of psychological and symbolic spaces.

    All elements coherently merge in one environment that is constituted by three main apparatuses, accompanied by a ready-made object: 1) a large circular projection screen onto which real-time computer graphic imagery is projected; 2) an interactive interface that the viewer holds in his/her hand. This looks like a large eye-ball, containing a sensing device that accurately measures its spatial position and orientation; and 3) a large transparent Plexiglas sphere with a hole in its center, into which the viewer can insert the eyeball interface and then move it about inside. This sphere provides the viewer with an ‘endo-spatial’ enclosure that manual exploration maps directly into the representation of the virtual domain.

    The eye-ball thus becomes a disembodied object- a virtual camera moving freely in space. The subject of observation in this real space is the transparent sphere, which when ‘looked at’ by the eye-ball, is itself seen to be represented as a virtual eye on the projection screen.

    When actually entering the transparent sphere with his/her hand, the viewer also enters this virtual eye through its iris, and then confronts an image tableau that is located within this virtual space. Exploring the inner space of the transparent sphere, the viewer also explores the scenography of this virtual image tableau that is spatially located within the sphere. This conjunction of a virtual and physical space is achieved because the eyeball interface communicates to the computer the exact coordinates of its point of view with reference to the physical sphere, and the computer then generates a representation of the virtual scenography onto the round projection screen in front of the viewer.

    The physical sphere establishes a boundary in the virtual world between the exterior representation of an eye and an interior representation of an image tableau that is implicitly contained within this eye. Outside the actual sphere the hand held eye-ball ‘perceives’ the virtual eye as an object (macrocosmos) that is conventionally represented in a traditional perspective view.

    This inside universe represents, as a computer-generated model, the iconography of a specific type of Hungarian folk art. That tradition created miniature religious scenes in glass bottles, and one example of such a bottle is also shown in the Handsight installation, illuminated in a box behind the viewer. The choice of this contextual reference was felt to be appropriate because such a bottle tableau also expresses a sign for mental (virtual) spaces enclosed in the world of physical forms.

    Handsight is an interactive computer graphic environment by Agnes Hegedus, first presented at the Ars Electronica in Linz, 1992.  Application software by Gideon May and Richard Holloway. Produced with the cooperation of the Zentrum für Kunst und Medientechnologie Karlsruhe.

  • Installation
  • Hudson Yards Competition
  • Ajmal Aqtash
  • SIGGRAPH 2008: Design and Computation
  • 2008
  • 2008 Skidmore Owings & Merrill Hudson Yards Competition
  • The design of One and Two Hudson Place is informed by the unique challenges and opportunities of the site. The curving footprints of the towers align with the train shed below, while monumental steel buttresses bridge the active rails. This fluid massing is combined through the height of the tower, projecting the site’s unique role in the Manhattan skyline. The building envelopes are transparent scrims of glass etched with graduated densities of ceramic frit, further accentuating the transforming geometry of the towers. The pattern and density of the layered frit glass maximizes natural daylighting and energy efficiency, while minimizing glare and reflecting the shimmering colors of New York City.

  • 3D printing of SOM models was made possible through a
    donation from York Technical College / 3D Systems

  • Skidmore, Owings & Merrill

  • Architecture and Design
  • Lotte Supertower
  • Ajmal Aqtash
  • SIGGRAPH 2008: Design and Computation
  • 2008
  • 2008 Skidmore Owings & Merrill Lotte Supertower
  • Lotte Super Tower is a super-tall, mixed-use building including retail, offices, hotel, and an observation deck in southeastern Seoul. The tower’s design, in which the building transforms smoothly from a square base to a circle at 1,640 feet (555 meters), is inspired by an organizational strategy based on an ancient Korean observatory.

  • Skidmore, Owings & Merrill

  • Architecture and Design
  • Yongsan Tower
  • Ajmal Aqtash
  • SIGGRAPH 2008: Design and Computation
  • 2008
  • 2008 Skidmore Owings & Merrill Yongsan Tower
  • In the largest historic transfer of land from public to private ownership, the city of Seoul has established a master plan for a new International Business District in the heart of the city. The centerpiece of the district will be a new landmark tower that will become the symbolic figure of Korea’s place in the global economy today and in the future.

  • Skidmore, Owings & Merrill

  • Architecture and Design
  • Phase Shift
  • Akihiko Kaneko
  • SIGGRAPH Asia 2015: Life on Earth
  • 2015
  • 2015 Kaneko: Phase Shift
  • This piece comments on the urban environment and quality of life, which can often change suddenly and unpredictably, without our being fully aware of the changes. We are flooded with information, which we consume and then discard like so much junk. The accumulation of the unconsciousness information is potentially hazardous to human relationships and environmental systems. This work expresses a warning to the urban community of the paralyzing power of information overload.

  • Installation
  • What Noh Masks Whisper to Us
  • Akiko Tohma
  • SIGGRAPH 2001: n-space
  • 2001
  • The representation of the human face is an endless motif for art. It continues to attract artists working on traditional paintings and sculptures, and those using today’s digital technologies. The existing sophisticated skills for face representation can bring us a lot of suggestive information. Noh masks, wooden sculptures used in Japanese traditional Noh drama, can be considered as one example.

    The masks used in Noh drama show diverse types of faces. However, a common impression given by Noh masks seems to be a “curious reality” – the coexistence of abstraction and deformation. This kind of realism could have never been achieved without an understanding of the anatomical essence of face shapes. Indeed, the observation of fine old masks, carved around the 14th century for example, suggests that the masters might well have understood the facial bone and muscle structures of the human face. Viewers are therefore able to project their memories of human faces onto the masks.

    This digital image was created under the observation of a Noh mask’s shape. The Noh mask appearing in the upper center of the image is a Ko-ornate mask used for young female roles. In the middle, there is an image of the mask with facial muscles, which are imagined to be beneath the Ko-omote face. The imagined skull of the Ko-ornate mask lies in the lower part. These three states, i.e., face, muscles, and bone, are arranged vertically, suggesting the aesthetic principles of traditional Japanese arts: TEN (Heaven-Space); CHI (Earth-Time); JIN (Man) also expressed in terms of SHIN (Formality); GYO (Semi-formality); and SO (Informality). The image also suggests the transition between life and death, or past and present, which are often described in Noh stories.

    The Ko-omote mask was created using a 3D computer graphics technique.’ The modeling process introduced a method of replicating a wooden Noh mask. Here, paper templates were created by measuring a wooden Ko-ornate mask and then digitized as guide curves for NURBS surface modeling. The use of a 3D scanner was therefore unnecessary. The surface texture of the mask was created using paint-draw software. Curves of facial muscle fibers were traced from anatomical data and projected onto the mask’s surface. The shape of the skull was modified to fit the Ko-ornate mask.

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Ink jet print on Pictorico fancy paper
  • 45cm x 100cm
  • 3D image, digital imagery, and ink jet print
  • Yuki - The Spirit of the Snow
  • Akiko Tohma
  • SIGGRAPH 2001: n-space
  • 2001
  • To examine how computers can attain the expression of Yugen (profound beauty) found in Japanese traditional Noh drama, a computer animation based on the Noh drama “Yuki” was created.’ The concept behind the creation was: the entire design should rely on the story; the movements of the Noh mask should be similar to the movements on an actual stage; and the animation sequences should be harmonized to bring out the most appropriate expressions from the Noh mask. By making these considerations, audiences could be expected to have diverse imaginative experiences even at a very subtle level, as in Noh drama.

    “Yuki” is a short story about an encounter one night with “The Spirit of the Snow” by a traveling priest. For “The Spirit of the Snow,” the Noh mask called Ko-omote was created as described in “What Noh Masks Whisper to Us.” As the modeling was done with reference only to a carved wooden mask, the mask’s shape retained the 3D-controlled asymmetry of the real mask, as well as a fluent carved surface and detailed edges. These shape characteristics were responsible for generating subtle changes in the mask’s expression.

    To move the Ko-omote mask, a head part and a skeleton of a body were created. Key frames were added to control all of the movements, which are in well-timed combinations with music and sound effects. In the dance part, the 3D models of a fan, a dance robe, and a wig band were bound to the skeleton. The character simulates basic movements of a Noh dance, and at the end, leaves towards the left side of the stage, in the same manner as in a real Noh play.

    n some situations, parts of the character’s body become invisible. However, this seems to succeed in creating a more effective expression than a full appearance of details. Such visual effects are inspired by Noh drama, where the effects depend not on the direct representation of objects but on the audience’s imagination.

  • Software: Alias|Wavefront Maya, Adobe After Effects
    Hardware: SGI Onyx2, Mac G3

  • Animation & Video
  • Animation
  • 3D animation, culture, and imagination
  • Luminescent Tentacles
  • Akira Nakayasu
  • SIGGRAPH Asia 2016: Mediated Aesthetics
  • 2016
  • Luminescent Tentacles is an interactive installation inspired by waving tentacles of sea anemones in the depths of the ocean. Comprised of 256 shape-memory alloy actuators, the elongated forms move in response to hand movements. Further accentuating the movement, the tip of each actuator softly glows like a bioluminescent organism. Each actuator, or tentacle, is activated by three shape-memory alloy wires, giving the tentacle the flexibility to bend in six directions through the combination of three currents. Employing principles of fluid dynamics, the control application replicates the movement of water ripples.

    Luminescent Tentacles also includes sounds, prompting the viewer to create music while using hand movements to stimulate the movement of the tentacles, thereby offering an experience similar to interacting with sea anemones.

  • Interactive & Monitor-Based
  • Robotic sculpture
  • http://nakayasu.com/?portfolio=luminescent-tentacles
  • Tentacle Flora
  • Akira Nakayasu
  • SIGGRAPH 2019: Proliferating Possibilities: Speculative Futures in Art and Design
  • 2018
  • 2019 Nakayasu Tentacle Flora
  • Tentacle Flora is a robotic sculpture inspired by a vision of a colony of the sea anemone growing on the coral. A shape-memory alloy actuator is used as tentacles and is composed of a BioMetal Fiber such that it can bend in three directions. The top of the actuator glows softly mimicking a bioluminescent organism using a full colored LED. The Tentacle Flora induces the beauty, wonder, and existence of living sea anemones in the depths of the ocean.

  • 3D & Sculpture and Electronic/Robotic Object
  • Robotic sculpture
  • http://nakayasu.com/?portfolio=tentacle-flora
  • Furnished Fluid
  • Akira Wakita
  • SIGGRAPH Asia 2015: Life on Earth
  • 2014
  • 2015 Wakita: Furnished Fluid
  • Furnished Fluid is a visualization that utilizes the air flow that we are practically unaware of in our daily lives. This installation, which integrates design miniatures and real-time images, enables us to use the power of science to make visible the appealing and valuable aspects of 20th century industrial design. W. W. Stool (1990) by Philippe Starck, Hill House 1 (1902) by Charles Rennie Mackintosh, and the Big Easy (1991) by Ron Arad were selected in tribute to these great designers.

  • Installation
  • Singing
  • Alain Bergeran
  • SIGGRAPH 1986: Painting in Light
  • 1986
  • Image Not Available
  • Installation
  • Photograph of raster image
  • Brush Traces I
  • Alain Bittler
  • SIGGRAPH 2006: Intersections
  • 2006 Bittler Brush Traces
  • Computers let us imagine new ways to draw pictures or to make paintings. With computers, we can create our own brushes (with virtual meshes), and we can use them to create new impressions. In European design and graphic arts, we start the thinking process by making a pencil sketch, but now I can do things that I am unable to do with a pencil.

    I was very impressed by the giant calligraphies at the National Museum in Tokyo, Japan and the Japanese calligraphy demonstra­tion at CEEJA in Colmar, France. These works conveyed a lot of mystery and secrets. That’s why I started the Brush Traces series in July 2005. It is a good transition between the Movement series (2003-2005) and the digital-calligraphy series I plan to work on next.

    In Brush Traces, I revisit Asian brush painting and add another dimension, a visual-musical (or mathematical) partition-vibration trace that refers to music, oscillation, and traces of time or some sort of language. Is time becoming solid? Or is music becoming solid?

    In my composition, I juxtapose light against shadow, movement against stasis, order against disorder, visual music against visual imagery, waves against flatness, and physics against quantum physics in a virtual time-space generated by computer. I created this work with an out-of-time aesthetic, between the two infinites, which places this work conceptually between European and Asian art.

    Piet Mondrian was the first artist who discovered the two infinites. He expressed them with horizontal and vertical lines after research­ing the infinite territory between the shape and the non-shape. Roman Verostko is the first artist who used technology to make Asian brush painting. The Brush Traces series is a true fusion between those two visions of art.

  • I create virtual meshes. I use those meshes like a brush and capture their movement with a tempo (or iteration) to produce traces. If the tempo is reduced to zero, intervals become invisible, and the image looks like a solid mesh. Otherwise, the intervals show sequences of time with regular speed or with some acceleration. All these factors are the same for both music composition and calligraphy.

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • 3D-generated image printed on velvet paper
  • 52" x 39"
  • Movement 11 (2008 series)
  • Alain Bittler
  • SIGGRAPH Asia 2008: Synthesis
  • In this expression of the energy of a virtual dancer, we can see the vibration of his virtual movements in the universe. My work is about my impression of Asian wisdom and gods.

  • Animation & Video
  • MOVEMENT 4
  • Alain Bittler
  • SIGGRAPH 2004: Synaesthesia
  • 2004
  • For me, 30 programs are a means to experiment. I build universes composed of industrial materials that can be altered or degraded. In those worlds, every being or object is generated from these materials. Sceneries and objects are modeled as mesh sculptures generated in the computer. These assemblies of points and polygons are later clad with textures. The next step in the conception is choosing the lighting sources: either spotlights or luminescent surfaces. Finally, a picture is taken with a virtual camera. This picture is entirely generated “in silica.” The computer becomes a camera able to take photos of objects devoid of physical reality. The virtual lens captures a moving virtual world, which allows it to take time-lapse shots to create new objects. Indeed, one can record the movement of an object in a given timeframe, and the combination of these positions generates a new virtual 3D object, which can in turn have its own movement and trajectory. In the footsteps of futurists, I pursue my studies in a domain close to abstraction, in territory opened by new technologies. The sy nthetic images I generate are parametered mathematically and can be modified according to duration. Far from these constraints, I try to convey a journey, a self study, a poetic vision, or a form of spirituality.

    I draw my inspiration from cinematographic sources, like Fritz Lang’s “Metropolis” and the masterpieces of Miyasaki, celebrated for his poetic visions. I am also inspired by fashion designers’ creations such as lssey Miyake’s sculptural garments.

  • I use traditional 30 programs to create my pictures, and there are no post-process effects after the rendering of the 30 programs.

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • 30-generated pictures printed on photo paper
  • 24 inches x 32 inches
  • MOVEMENT3
  • Alain Bittler
  • SIGGRAPH 2004: Synaesthesia
  • 2004
  • For me, 30 programs are a means to experiment. I build universes composed of industrial materials that can be altered or degraded. In those worlds, every being or object is generated from these materials.

    Sceneries and objects are modeled as mesh sculptures generated in the computer. These assemblies of points and polygons are later clad with textures. The next step in the conception is choosing the lighting sources: either spotlights or luminescent surfaces. Finally, a picture is taken with a virtual camera. This picture is entirely generated “in silica.” The computer becomes a camera able to take photos of objects devoid of physical reality. The virtual lens captures a moving virtual world, which allows it to take time-lapse shots to create new objects. Indeed, one can record the movement of an object in a given timeframe, and the combination of these positions generates a new virtual 3D object, which can in turn have its own movement and trajectory. In the footsteps of futurists, I pursue my studies in a domain close to abstraction, in territory opened by new technologies. The sy nthetic images I generate are parametered mathematically and can be modified according to duration. Far from these constraints, I try to convey a journey, a self study, a poetic vision, or a form of spirituality.

    I draw my inspiration from cinematographic sources, like Fritz Lang’s “Metropolis” and the masterpieces of Miyasaki, celebrated for his poetic visions. I am also inspired by fashion designers’ creations such as lssey Miyake’s sculptural garments.

  • I use traditional 30 programs to create my pictures, and there are no post-process effects after the rendering of the 30 programs.

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • 30-generated pictures printed on photo paper
  • 24 inches x 32 inches
  • Le Conte du monde flottant (The Tale of the Floating World)
  • Alain Escalle
  • SIGGRAPH 2002: Art Gallery
  • 2002
  • 2002 Escalle: LeContedumondeflottant
  • Hiroshima. On the morning of 6 August 1945, a bright light invaded the edge of the floating world. A man remembers. The shock, a violent blast. Bodies that stretched out in pain, the dreams of the past in the present, the visions of the future in the past. The child who he was, before. Before the flash struck. Before the world was disturbed.

  • Animation & Video
  • https://vimeo.com/groups/cinematograph/videos/5405204
  • history and memory
  • Quantum Beings
  • Alain Lioret
  • DAC Online Exhibition 2016: Science of the Unseen: Digital Art Perspectives
  • 2016
  • 2016 Lioret: Quantum Beings 1
  • Art is often a question of representation. And representation of life is at the heart of artistic creation. If one dives into very small size scales (beyond the famous Planck constant), we can work on the representation of life at the atomic scale.

    As everyone knows, at this scale , it is not the principles of classical physics that apply, but those of quantum mechanics. If one is interested in living in this type of dimension, he is faced with a population of protons, photons, electrons, and other particles, which form a strange ecosystem, and whose quantum behavior is difficult to understand. Behavior of elementary particles of our life defies our usual sense of space and time.

    Also, these particles form a living world in a higher number of dimensions. There are at least four dimensions, and probably more. As a digital and generative artist, it is quite exciting to be interested in this type of representation, and the use of computer helps us in this way. A quantum computer is not yet available, but many simulation tools exist, and allow us to make quantum calculations, no longer based on the classic use of bits, but rather qubits.

    The quantum theory is an important tool to enable travel in what is often called the fourth dimension, which is time. It is especially an important part of the functioning of wormholes, which can help build bridges in space-time.

    Exploring the possibilities of quantum mechanics for artistic creation opens new paths to a variety of creative ways. The use of quantum instead of classical calculations is just beginning.

    Many new artistic explorations are at the corner of our future!

  • Media Used: Python, Blender

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Onyrisk
  • Alain Mongeau, Eric Mattson, and Suzie Dumont
  • SIGGRAPH 1993: Machine Culture
  • “Onyrisk” is a word play in French: «ony» comes from the term «onirisme», which refers to the dream state; «risk» was added to qualify the unknown involved in the interactive experience.

    Onyrisk offers interactive surrogate travel through allegorical representations of dreamlike sequences. It is an experimental work that develops tools for a new interactive art form, which explores the limits of interactivity as applied to time-based material. The eerie texture of the visual, combined with an equivalent soundtrack, were chosen to enable greater connectibility among the different components; the global interactivity of our work is enriched by its combined potential.

    In our normal state of consciousness, we are continually assailed by images surrounding us; we store those that are personally meaningful. By the time they settle in our memory, and eventually our unconscious, these images have been transformed by the filters of our personal perceptions. According to our differences and previous experiences, we create associations, arrange them in hierarchies of meaning, and give them emotional qualities.

    During the sleeping state, the unconscious draws on this large repertoire of images and plays with them, juxtaposing, superimposing, and giving them an ambient and a symbolic quality. Onyrisk reproduces this process, but unlike dreams that remain essentially private, it exteriorizes the process and creates a communal and interactive experience.

    Onyrisk is an attempt to implement true computer interactivity in the deep layers of the audiovisual, tracking and taking each of the viewers’ decisions into account before moving on to the next sequence. Its interface is both fluid and full of the unexpected: it offers diverse images and sounds to the user in a fashion of ordered randomness.

    Each user assists the computer in the creation of a unique path reflecting his/her own aesthetic and emotional patterns. In the process, s/he performs a sort of public dream. The experience is again analogous to the dream state in that only significant fragments are remembered. And these images will in turn perhaps become the source of new unconscious recombinations and transformations in future dreams.

    Onyrisk is both a work in progress and a continually evolving project. It is the tangible expression of our theoretical work on interactivity, art, symbolism, and the conceptualization of hypermedia applications.

  • Interactive & Monitor-Based
  • Untitled (Crystal Tinkertoys)
  • SIGGRAPH 1986: Universal Spheres
  • 1982
  • Image Not Available
  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Photograph of raster image
  • Untitled (Rings of Spheres)
  • SIGGRAPH 1986: Universal Spheres
  • 1982
  • Image Not Available
  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Photograph of raster image
  • Pantomation
  • Alan Jackson and Tom DeWitt
  • SIGGRAPH 1986: A Retrospective
  • 1986
  • Image Not Available
  • Installation
  • Laser projector
  • 8 x 8 x 20 ft
  • Kreuzberg #1
  • Alan Luft
  • SIGGRAPH 1988: Art Show
  • 1987
  • 1988 Luft Kreuzberg No 1
  • Hardware: Apple IIe
    Software: Dazzle Draw

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • photo
  • 5" x 3.5" in.
  • Kreuzberg #2
  • Alan Luft
  • SIGGRAPH 1988: Art Show
  • 1987
  • 1988 Luft Kreuzberg No 2
  • Hardware: Apple IIe
    Software: Dazzle Draw

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • photo
  • 5" x 3.5" in.
  • Luminous Erototron
  • Alan Marshall
  • SIGGRAPH 1985: Art Show
  • 1984
  • 1984 Alan Marshall Luminous Erototron
  • Hardware: Zilog system controller
    Software: J. Watkins

  • Installation
  • Kinetic light sculpture
  • 36 x 48 x 36 in
  • Fractal Domains of Attraction — 8
  • Alan Norton
  • SIGGRAPH 1983: Art Show
  • 1983
  • 1983 Norton Fractal Domains Of Attraction 01
  • Hardware: FPI90L Array Processor, IBM 3033, Ramtek 9400 frame buffer, Matrix camera
    Software: written in FORTRAN

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Cibachrome print
  • 20 x 24 in.
  • cibachrome print
  • Fractal Domains of Attraction — 9
  • Alan Norton
  • SIGGRAPH 1983: Art Show
  • 1983
  • 1983 Norton FractalDomainsOfAttraction 9 02
  • Hardware: FP190L Array Processor, IBM 3033, Ramtek 9400 frame buffer, Matrix camera
    Software: written in FORTRAN

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Cibachrome print
  • 20 x 24 in.
  • cibachrome print
  • Empire of Sleep: The Beach
  • Alan Price
  • SIGGRAPH 2010: TouchPoint: Haptic Exchange Between Digits
  • 2009
  • Empire of Sleep is an interactive virtual environment installation viewed in stereoscopic 3D on a large rear projection screen. Participants interact using a hand-held camera to take photographs of the scene, triggering the virtual camera to move to new points of interest. A group of surreallooking figures, clothed in early 20th century bathing suits, are scattered about on several isolated sand bars somewhere on an open and calm body of water. They first appear as if there for recreation, but there is a pensive mood, as if some unusual event is taking place unknown to the viewer.

    Alan Price’s interest is in creating new forms of interactive and virtual cinema, in which the viewer’s experience is informed by alternate methods of both display and user input, creating an intuitive and visceral sensation for the viewer in extending his or her reach into the space in which the story or event unfolds, creating virtual worlds that have awareness and responsiveness to the presence of the observer. It is not about user intervention or control of the story, but rather the symbiotic relationship between the observer and the narrative event. Price is interested in designing physical user interfaces that are thematically interpretive of the subject matter represented in the work and, more importantly, that allow the viewer to feel as if physically extended into the virtual space, giving a sense of embodiment and immersion that dissolves the separation between the two. This is not limited to methods for engaging multiple senses or surrounding the viewer to make him or her feel physically immersed, but investigating ways in which actions and their familiarity, such as taking a photograph, provide a sense of playing a role and of being integral to the representation of events taking place.

  • Augmented Reality/Virtual Reality
  • Bird Cage
  • Alan Rath
  • SIGGRAPH 1988: Art Show
  • 1988
  • 1988 Rath Bird Cage
  • Hardware: micro, digital frame store, speech synthesizer -A. Rath
    Software: Z-80 assembler, A. Rath

  • Installation and Interactive & Monitor-Based
  • Interactive Installation
  • Word Processor
  • Alan Rath
  • SIGGRAPH 1988: Art Show
  • 1988
  • 1988 Rath Word Processor
  • Hardware: micro, digital frame store, speech synthesizer -A. Rath
    Software: Z-80 assembler, A. Rath

  • Installation and Interactive & Monitor-Based
  • Interactive Installation
  • Bentlow Stairs: An Electronic Artist's Book
  • Alan Stacell, Ed Cunnius, Elnor Kinsella, Susan Kirchman, and Jeff Raymond
  • SIGGRAPH 1993: Machine Culture
  • Our work is an illustrated hypertext about a seagoing city called Bentlow Stairs. Bentlow Stairs is like all cities, a never finished, giant machine where people live, work, and dream. Unlike other cities, Bentlow Stairs is adrift – it is a massive floating steel lattice, free to roam the world’s oceans. The book listens in on the inhabitants of the city as they consider themselves and the place they are building. Bentlow Stairs is about the culture and character of these people, and about the philosophy behind the making of all cities – even fantastic ones that float on the sea.

    The story is told via electronically composited images and text that are presented as frames in the KMS hypertext system. The direction and flow of the book are controlled by the viewer using a mouse to select links. The illustrated fiction of the book consists of bit-mapped images overlaid with invisible link fields. These fields are made visible only when the cursor touches them; each frame contains from one to as many as six links. By scanning the screen with a mouse, the viewer can determine which elements are associated with a link and then choose whether or not to follow the link to pursue a particular story line. Some links are associated with words, others are associated with visual elements such as buildings or characters. Bentlow Stairs consists of more than 250 frames. Since the hypertext is a collaboration among several artists, a system was needed that supported multiple authorship; with KMS we could all work on the same set of frames simultaneously from multiple workstations.

    Bentlow Stairs is presented within the context of an installation. The installation consists of large printouts of drawings, text, and characters from the book mounted on eight-foot panels. These panels are cut into different shapes and arranged around a small white wooden table and three chairs. On the table, there is a three-button optical mouse and mouse pad. Suspended in front of the table is a large screen where the frames are projected. The installation provides an environment within which viewers can interact with the book in a way that is more engaging than is possible with a desktop display. Everything seen and heard – including the other participants in the space – is a part of the mimesis. As such, the installation is an architectural connection between the viewer and the virtual city.

    Bentlow Stairs’ matrix of interconnected frames mirrors its structure and the relationships of its people. It invites the viewer to move through the metaphor of the city through a series of invisible doors. Each person who navigates through the hypertext assembles a different concept of the city, much like driving the streets of a strange town. Each person who reads the book can have a different experience. This “hyperspace” creates the sensation of moving through the piece, following trails that slowly build a large illustrated poem. It is this crafting and navigation of browsable trails through visual information that is central to the hypertext phenomenon. The structure of the hypertext is the heart of Bentlow Stairs; the individual images are the hinges in its web.

    Our initial awareness of “working with a computer” has faded. As a tool, it is more familiar to us now than our old ways of making art. We take for granted that this device can do what it can do, and we are restless to make things with it. Bentlow Stairs is one result of that impulse, and it has been the one that has challenged us the most. By focusing on the phenomenology of hypertext, we work with only a small part of the art – making potential of computers. However, in using this rather simple information handling concept, we have had to think as painters, filmmakers, poets, and story tellers.We have attempted to build interactive narratives that can semantically flex and be retold by the viewer as he or she navigates the hypertext.

  • Interactive & Monitor-Based
  • Lily and Snout
  • Alban Denoyel and Bobby Beck
  • DAC Online Exhibition 2017: Immersive Expressions: Virtual Reality on the Web
  • 2017
  • Lily & Snout by Alban Denoyel and Bobby Beck is a WebVR short animation. It is the result of a partnership by the two companies Sketchfab and Artella. They present a fully hosted player on the web that can be experienced in VR on any headset. The project demonstrates the potential for viewing animated content on the web where the viewer takes control of the camera and even provides a glimpse of the creation process while experiencing the content by allowing wireframe views and different shader choices. The animated content demonstrates the ability of the browser to render appealing characters while the custom built player is a efficient interface for a variety of content.
  • Augmented Reality/Virtual Reality
  • WebVR
  • https://sketchfab.com/models/618ea0209b1045e89b2c6d2b74d0956e
  • animation and WebVR
  • Los Angeles City Hall
  • Albert C. Martin
  • SIGGRAPH 1984: CAD Show
  • 1984 Martin: Los Angeles City Hall
  • Software:
    Developed by the computer group at Albert C. Martin Associates

  • Composition of Surfaces in Light

    Working models of wood, cardboard or clay, and graphic media such as watercolor and charcoal have traditionally been used to study the modulation of light by building surfaces. Now that high­-resolution color raster display devices are available at a reasonable cost, computer graphics provides an increasingly attractive alternative. Software can be written to allow convenient variation of building form, color, light-source characteristics and of viewing parameters.

  • Architecture and Design
  • 3D model
  • Word Power
  • Albert Giros
  • SIGGRAPH 2004: Synaesthesia
  • 2004
  • Word, intention, will, action, power. Some instinctive, primary human speech stops the flood of reality. It’s Art. Sometimes people say NO: political and artistic action. Work of art: ideogram: explosion of meanings.

  • I try to reduce the sophisticated action of technology so we can see the primary and basic traces of the work. In this case, pencil drawing and scanner + digital video capture; extremely rudimentary digitalization.

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • 80 centimeters x 196 centimeters
  • Self-Portrait 1-Birth
  • Albert Marquez
  • SIGGRAPH 1987: Art Show
  • 1987 Marquez Self-Portrait 1-Birth
  • Hdw: IBM PC
    Sftw: PC Paintbrush System

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • 11" x 14"
  • Into the Air's Memory
  • Albert Yu
  • SIGGRAPH 2003: CG03: Computer Graphics 2003
  • 2003
  • 2003 Yu: Into the Air's Memory
  • Into the Air’s Memory is a two-channel computer animation about an elusive acquaintance between a sound seeker who listens to memories of the dead and a woman who wanders aimlessly with an empty wheelchair.

  • Animation & Video
  • computer animation and memory
  • 90° South
  • Alejandro Borsani
  • SIGGRAPH 2012: In Search of the Miraculous
  • 2010
  • In 90° South, Borsani attempts to create the experience of a constantly changing landscape by building a system with an unpredictable emergent topography. For Borsani, “all the knowledge of the world is gained from our own particular points of view, or from some experience of the world without which the symbols of science would be meaningless. In order to find new possibilities, we must begin by reawakening the basic experience of the world of which words are the second-order expression. Wonderment is critical, since it allows for continued curiosity to this basic experience and thus creates the possibility for change.

    Borsani’s work is an active exploration of the nature of perception and media representation in the form of sculptures, installations, and environments. With non-spectacular technologies he creates ambiguous moments between the event and the effect so the viewer may experience an instant where rational reflection, bodily experimentation, and emotional contemplation become indivisible. He is fascinated by the idea of using physical phenomena as the main materials for his installations. Borsani’s most recent work uses gravity, heat, cold, and chemical reactions to investigate how human beings deal with the inorganic, wordless nature of their environments.

  • Alejandro Borsani’s 90° South provides a contemplative point of view that allows the viewer to witness and be immersed in the constant evolution of a growing landscape. The work utilizes an irrigation system in conjunction with a highly absorbent material (sodium polyacrylate) to produce a slowly emerging landscape. A thin layer of the white material is placed on top of a round surface. When water reaches the surface, the sodium polyacrylate expands 300 times, producing subtle undulations. The profiles of these miniature mountains are projected onto the walls of the gallery using a flashlight attached to a rotating mechanism.

  • Installation
  • Global Eyes Web Site
  • Alejandro Perez-Avila
  • SIGGRAPH 2007: Global Eyes
  • 2007
  • This web site highlights alternative networks that connect creative people around the world, including native and indigenous communities that use digital media to bring their voices, memories, and cultures to each other and a wider public, transcending political boundaries.

  • The site was created with Flash ActionScript and HTML.

  • Lucy Petrovic
  • Interactive & Monitor-Based
  • Haven
  • Alex Beim
  • SIGGRAPH 2018: Original Narratives
  • 2018
  • Haven is a place of security and tranquility. Reminiscent of a mother’s womb, it recalls our origins, where it all begins. The installation allows guests to leave their phones and all other technology at the door so they can be fully present without any of the prevailing modern distractions. They go in, spend some time, find themselves and maybe come out and start their day again. Fresh. A new beginning.

  • Installation
  • Starrynight
  • Alex Galloway
  • SIGGRAPH 2000: Art Gallery
  • 2000
  • Each time someone reads a text at Rhizome.org, a dim star appears on a black Web page. When a text is read again, the corresponding star gets a bit brighter. Over time, the Web page comes to resemble a starry night sky, with bright stars corresponding to the most popular texts and dim stars corresponding to less-popular ones. Clicking on a star triggers a special pop-up menu. The first menu option allows you to read the text that corresponds to the star. The second menu option allows you to select a keyword associated with that text. After selecting a keyword, Starrynight draws a unique constellation of stars whose texts share that keyword. You can use these constellations to find other related texts, and in doing so, follow your interests through the vast array of ideas and information in the Rhizome.org archive.

  • Mark Tribe and Martin Wattenberg
  • Internet Art
  • Web site interface
  • http://www.rhizome.org/
  • human-computer interaction, information, and website
  • Haider
  • Alex Kempkens
  • SIGGRAPH 1986: Painting in Light
  • 1984
  • 1984 Kempkens Haider
  • Installation
  • Photograph of raster image
  • W. F. a
  • Alex Kempkens
  • SIGGRAPH 1986: Painting in Light
  • 1984
  • Image Not Available
  • Installation
  • Photograph of raster image
  • W. F. b
  • Alex Kempkens
  • SIGGRAPH 1986: Painting in Light
  • 1984
  • Image Not Available
  • Installation
  • Photograph of raster image
  • W. F. c
  • Alex Kempkens
  • SIGGRAPH 1986: Painting in Light
  • 1984
  • Image Not Available
  • Installation
  • Photograph of raster image
  • Fractals, Particles, Photons, & Microwaves
  • Alex Lee
  • DAC Online Exhibition 2016: Science of the Unseen: Digital Art Perspectives
  • 2016
  • 2016 Lee: Fractals
  • Fractals, Particles, Photons, & Microwaves is a single-channel 3D animation evoking the language of physics, mathematics, and quantum mechanics. Procedurally animated, the piece conveys concepts found in ‘The Little Book of String Theory’ by Steven S. Gubser. The flow of particles represent electrons & positrons (E) and photons (Y). Particles are animated visualizing what happens when an electron splits into anti-electrons during a cascade event (an electromagnetic particle shower).

    In quantum mechanical theory, a particle shower is a predictable event and suggests that an electron all by itself may have infinite charge and infinite mass, but once split, its charge and mass becomes finite. A common example of particle showers would be when cosmic rays hit earth’s atmosphere. There is a commonality between the behavior of structures in the subatomic & cosmic scales – the unseen behavior of particles follows the mathematical pattern of recursion, and is metaphorically related to the fractal structure of cosmic background radiation.

  • Animation & Video
  • 4:34 min.
  • The Yawn Chorus
  • Alex Rothera, Christopher Baker, Christopher G. Thompson, and Shek Po Kwan
  • SIGGRAPH 2019: Proliferating Possibilities: Speculative Futures in Art and Design
  • 2019 Rothera Thompson Baker Kwan The Yawn Chorus
  • We’ve created an Artificial Intelligence that can identify yawns. It’s able to recognize them during, or even before the yawn strikes! As yawns are contagious for humans (and actually many animals), our AI can trigger chain reactions of yawns by capturing and releasing yawns.

    Sit, lay, relax and listen to our AI sing melodies constructed purely out of the yawns of guests.

    As our festival progresses, the computer will learn more and more how to identify yawns. It will become smarter in predicting and also evoking them. While our AI captures more yawns, it is actually capturing more “instruments” for its orchestra. Watch as our AI musician moves from a 1 computer band, to a thousand strong orchestra of yawns.

  • Installation
  • Installation
  • https://alexrothera.com/Yawn-Chorus
  • Spheres of Influence
  • Alex Villacorta
  • SIGGRAPH 2007: Global Eyes
  • 2007
  • The Spheres of Influence (SOI) project is an interactive digital art and information exhibit that visualizes the content and distribution of online world news. News, in the form of narratives and images describing current events, is a vital class of information, which is produced and consumed continuously in time and space. People from all parts of the world rely on news outlets to present relevant reporting on issues that are important to them. However, the topics that are important to one class of people often differ significantly from on another. To illuminate this difference in perspective, the SOI project measures, compares, and visualizes the importance different countries, geographic regions, and language groups place on news stories, based on volumes of reports and the locations of the organizations disseminating them. The main objective is to present the general public with an immersive space that allows for exploration of global news coverage within the temporal, spatial, and semantic properties of the reports. Traditional media sources are often rooted in ethnocentric points of view, but when viewers can visually and spatially interact with the distribution of global news, they may gain a better understanding of the topics important to different cultures. Finally, the news data obtained from this ongoing operation of the installation are captured and maintained as a valuable data source of global information flow. Our goals reflect the interests of seven student researchers from the fields of statistics, geography, computer science, electrical and computer engineering, psychology, and art in addressing the content of web news reporting and the interactive installation (navigation by means of users’ movement in the exhibit space).

  • The physical layout of the SOI installation space consists of four side-by-side widescreen LCD monitors with four overhead cameras tracking user movement. The system was implemented in C++, Python, OpenGL, and OpenCV totaling over 6,000 lines of code. Users navigate by moving in the space, literally stepping into news stories of global interest and exploring several possible paths, including the distribution and magnitude of reporting, as well as temporal changes to both its quantity and content. A PostgresSQL database is filled with data by automated scripts that collect and cluster news reports from the internet. Using the spatially enabled features of the GIS database, the system maps the source and subject locations of the stories and adds animated graphic elements that indicate connections between them. Because the system is modal, the information that needs to be processed and displayed depends on the position and actions of users. The challenge of this implementation is efficiently coordinating the various subsystems of the installation to create a seamless user experience.

  • Karl Grossner, Jonathan Ventura, Anne-Marie Hansen, Emily Moxley, Joriz De Guzman, and Matt Peterson
  • Interactive & Monitor-Based
  • The Bernoulli Itinerary
  • Alexander Hahn
  • SIGGRAPH 1990: Digital Image-Digital Cinema
  • 1990
  • Animation & Video
  • video installation (3 channels)
  • 10 x 3.5 x 6 in
  • Urban Memories
  • Alexander Hahn
  • SIGGRAPH 1988: Art Show
  • 1988 Hahn Urban Memories
  • Hardware: Fairlight, Macintosh, Jones colorizer frame buffer, Keyer, Mac Vision digitizer
    Software: MacDraw, MacPaint

  • Animation & Video
  • Animation
  • 4:00
  • Equinoctial Sleep
  • Alexander Jamison
  • SIGGRAPH 1994: Art and Design Show
  • 1993
  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Iris SmartJet print
  • 7.5 x 10.5 inches
  • necrolog of robin williams or the suicide of irony
  • Alexander Repp
  • DAC Online Exhibition 2015: Enhanced Vision - Digital Video
  • 2014
  • 2014 Repp: necrolog
  • On 13 August 2014, between 11:25 pm and 11:45 pm, BBC Three showed the episode of Family Guy involving Robin Williams and his failed suicide attempt. Shortly afterwards, at 11:56 pm, Reuters news agency confirmed the suicide of Robin Williams. It is an uncanny coincidence, but what does it mean for the tragic irony of the cartoon? In an inverted form of irony, the audience has an advance in knowledge from the fictional world towards the real world. Can we still speak of irony?

    In a virtual journey through the Twitter network we might perceive a narrative obituary, that was created by related twitter users. Inductively, the opinions spread in just a few minutes. Consequently, a wave of empathy traveled across the network. The broadcast brought people together, in a bizarre and eerie way, who were trying to figure out a way to response to the incident.

  • Software: Blender, Gephi, Linux/Lenovo ThinkPad W520

  • Animation & Video
  • Video
  • 3:00 min.
  • Axiomatic Wisdom
  • Alexdrina Chong
  • SIGGRAPH 2006: Intersections
  • 2006 Chong Axiomatic Wisdom
  • As a graphic designer, I work with themes and concepts. There’s always a struggle between the balance of clarity and personal ex­pression. However, when I draw, the best of me arrives when I manage to simply detach from this balance. As all my “artistic” training becomes inert, the iridescent chaos of the mind lights up the space for a quiescent dialogue between the subject (my drawing) and me. When working with other media, technical issues, quite often interrupt the flow of my expression. Trials and failures eventually discourage the process and distance me from the impetus to create. Surprisingly, this obstacle is removed when I work primarily with digital media, especially when I draw with a digital apparatus such as a Wacom tablet.

    Even though most of my works are non-representational in nature, within the drawings one can find words and other indications of the sources that have indirectly influenced the process of creation. Axiomatic Wisdom is a piece that was done while I was having a conversation online with a friend from Russia and listening to a live report on the disappointing 2004 election results. Our conversa­tion revolved around the topic of unilateral and axiomatic thinking in American society. However, there were other levels of the story going on in my mind, overlapping with the conversation and subconsciously illustrated in the composition.

    I believe my work introduces a different dimension to both digital art­ists and artists in “traditional” media simply because the expression manages to transcend the medium. A lot of digital artists are very medium-driven. My works simply illustrate the dialogue between the subject matter and myself.

  • This piece was created in Photoshop using a Wacom tablet (Graphire). The intention was to create an image that has an ink-drawing or etched look. Photoshop has numerous applications that allow the artist to create effects needed for this approach. One can create dif­ferent brushes and textures to achieve certain effects. Having control over the sizes of the brushes is a great advantage for the artist. It supports experimentation with different single-brush textures and strokes. The layering application, on the other hand, allows the artist to play with layering imagery (textures, typography, etc) to create an ink smearing and running effect.

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Photoshop with Wacom tablet, inkjet print
  • 32" x 57"
  • Paint Wall
  • Alfio Pozzoni, Dongseop Lee, Tommaso Colombo, Jae Joong Lee, Jin Wan Park, Seon Noh, Minji Song, and Moonjung Go
  • SIGGRAPH Asia 2013: Art Gallery
  • This work represents a mural painting in which many people are taking part. Human beings had done visual representations in a cave or skeletons of an animal before civilization. For instance, the prehistoric Lascaux cave mural in France, which is estimated to be around 22,000 BC, is a prime example; thus, mural painting can be regarded as the oldest form of a painting. Mural painting generates an effect of dividing and contrasting the architectural parts visually, and is also utilized as a decorative element of a wall. This work aims to make sure that many people will be able to participate in a mural painting work as an architectural form as including the interactive and fluidic elements using a smartphone as a tool, which is the product of the modern digital development.

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Taj Dancing
  • Alice Rosen, Tony Lupidi, and Sharon McCormack
  • SIGGRAPH 1988: Art Show
  • 1988
  • 1988 Rosen Lupidi McCormack Taj Dancing
  • Hardware: VAX 11/780 32-bit frame buffer
    Software: O.S.U.

  • Installation
  • hologram
  • 20" x 10" in.
  • Wonder
  • Alicia Eggert
  • SIGGRAPH Asia 2011: FANTAsia
  • Eggert: Wonder
  • Wonder (2011) is an interactive, kinetic sculpture. The work is essentially a living drawing, a residuum of movement that is brought to life by the movement of others. From a distance, the white dots appear to be a constellation, and the work remains static. As a person approaches, the motors suddenly come to life and the dots slowly coalesce to spell the word ‘wonder’. However, much like a pointillist painting, the word is illegible when viewed up close. Because of that, it ideally requires two or more people to participate. The person approaching or ‘wondering’ becomes the artist/performer, physically bringing the work to fruition with their movements. Onlookers are given the ability to see the ‘wonder’ in the making, both literally and metaphorically. The typically passive act of looking becomes a physically active performance, and people in the vicinity are able to watch and be entertained by the spectacle of it. It is the sculpture’s playful nature that really interests me. Whether or not viewers ever discover the word ‘wonder’ within the work is not important. Meaning is constructed and elaborated collectively, through a shared and hopefully memorable experience.

  • 3D & Sculpture and Interactive & Monitor-Based
  • The Book of Hours
  • Aliyah Marr
  • SIGGRAPH 1999: technOasis
  • 1999
  • The Book of Hours is a non-narrative interactive multimedia piece named after the famous “Book of Hours” popular as a book of devotion in the Dark Ages.

    An assemblage of original paintings, photographs, sounds and video clips, the nine “scenes” evoke a feeling of melancholy at the passage of time, loss, the bittersweet of memories, and the realization of personal mortality. The nine scenes develop at the viewer’s pace, with hints of discovery and revelation, culminating in an interactive maze. The maze was an important symbol of the Middle Ages, representing life’s journey, and was often painted on the floor of cathedrals. Completing the maze in this piece closes the circuit; the viewer ends up back at the “beginning”.

    The original Book of Hours was a source of prayers and meditations, to be executed by the devotee at certain hours and in certain seasons. My Book of Hours is meant to be likewise cyclical, feminine in form, non-linear and meditative.

  • Interactive & Monitor-Based
  • Interactive CD-ROM
  • interactive CD-ROM, memory, and history
  • Self.270
  • Allen Cosgrove
  • SIGGRAPH 1987: Art Show
  • 1987 Cosgrove Self.270
  • I frame grabbed an image of myself and a book illustration, photographed the screen in black and white, enlarged the photo onto several sheets of high contrast film in different exposures, and printed these in color onto a sheet of white vinyl …

  • Hdw: NEC APC4/Definicon/Targa

    Sftw: Digital Arts DGS-1

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Photo
  • 21" x 27"
  • Noobie
  • Allison Druin and G. Gordon
  • SIGGRAPH 1987: Art Show
  • 1987 Druin, Gordon: Noobie
  • This computing environment has been nicknamed “NOOBIE” (short for “New Beast”) because of its huggable exterior that includes fur, feathers, and iridescent fish skin.

  • Hd: Macintosh/TXSynthesizer
    Sftw: Video works

  • Installation and Interactive & Monitor-Based
  • Interactive Soft Sculpture
  • 52" x 66" x 66"
  • Manicured Field
  • Allison Kudla
  • DAC Online Exhibition 2011: Analogue is the New Digital
  • 2011
  • 3D & Sculpture
  • Linkages
  • Alma de la Serra
  • SIGGRAPH 2007: Global Eyes
  • 2007
  • Linkages combines a topological exercise in dividing the picture plane with half and quarter circles with a play of geometric proportions and colors based on the Fibonacci series and the related Lucas series. Within the armature
    of arcs and planes are embedded images from a variety of sources: the Visible Human project of the US National Institute of Health, images from the Hubble Space Telescope,
    high-resolution images of earth from various NASA space flights, and digitized photographs by Alma de la Serra. Algorithmically produced texts add another layer. Fictitious artist Alma de la Serra, invented by the flesh-and-blood artist Paul Hertz, is a former high school math teacher turned photographer and a member of the Ignostudio, an artists’ cooperative home to three other fictitious artists: dysfunctional fortune-teller Juan Teodosio Pescador, also known as “Ignotus the Mage”; painter Darrell Luce; and digital media artist Paul Hertz. These fictitious artists
    offer Hertz an opportunity to critique and parody the experiences of artists marketing their art and struggling to survive, and to develop “product lines” very different from his own. While de la Serra has not yet provided a full
    explanation of her imagery, it is not out of place to suggest that she is looking for a way to engage social issues while placing her point of departure in a formal idiom. She states of her work: “My premises are simple: the world is deeper than our knowledge, and everything in it belongs to life. I have learned to understand this through number, measure, and reason, and to my astonishment have found that these tools, rightly understood, can speak to the breadth and depth of our experience.”

  • Linkages consists of seven square modules that can fit together into any configuration, provided they are hung with the diagonals of the squares perpendicular to the floor. Images were digitized from analog film or obtained from public-domain sources on the internet. In Adobe Illustrator, topological divisions of a square by arcs were regulated by Fibonacci and Lucas series to create an armature for images. The armatures and images were combined with texts in Photoshop. Linkages was printed on a high-resolution inkjet printer with an archival inkset on archival paper.

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Multi-panel collage of digitized photos, texts, and geometry
  • 17.0 inches x 45.25 inches
  • Subway Stories
  • Alon Chitayat and Jeff Ong
  • SIGGRAPH 2014: Acting in Translation
  • 2013
  • 2014_Alon Chitayat and Jeff Ong, Subway Stories
  • Over five million people ride the subway in New York City every day. Crammed shoulder to shoulder, face to face, and every position in between, subway rides are seemingly “interactive experiences.” Despite the close quarters, riding the subway is often an isolating experience; one of the last frontiers where phone service is largely absent, leaving its inhabitants to their own thoughts, conversations, music, etc. Like a horizontal elevator, passengers anxiously wait for their stop, acutely aware of their temporary neighbors. Subway Stories looks to reconcile this isolation through the power of storytelling. The project is rooted in hand-drawn illustrations of real people commuting in and around the city. Moving from drawings to an interactive storytelling environment, our artistic translation of the everyday subway ride is not meant to create an entirely new reality. Instead, our task with Subway Stories is to bring a familiar experience— listening and imagining and creating stories for commuting neighbors—to the audience for explicit consideration. Interactive technology provides the tools for translation. Combining physical controls with audio/visual feedback creates an immersive, alternative subway environment that audiences can enter and exit at any point. The project bypasses the socially unacceptable act of voyeurism (i.e., staring at/eavesdropping on a stranger) in public space. This subversion allows the audience to explore the inner lives of these passengers without consequence or hesitation.

  • Subway Stories is an interactive storytelling installation first presented at New York University. The experience begins with a projection of an animated subway car. The train is filled with passengers—illustrations of real-life commuters drawn on subway rides across New York City. A physical “conductor’s box” gives users control of where the projection is focused. One handle controls the train’s speed, and the other handle controls the camera zoom. The audience hears the thoughts and sounds of the passenger in focus. Zooming into specific characters triggers their “stories”—audio narrations recorded to capture the inner lives of each passenger.

  • Installation
  • Simulating Human Physical Differences
  • Alonzo Miranda
  • SIGGRAPH 1984: CAD Show
  • 1984 Miranda: Simulating Human Physical Differences 1
  • Human performance is usually dictated by the environment and our ability to adapt to its conditions. Understanding the multiple aspects of disability is a hard task for designers. Unfortunately, most of the design efforts for the disabled or handicapped to date have resulted in little more than wheelchair-accessible buildings.

    The objective of this research is to help designers to create products that can serve an extended range of people, especially those with disabilities. A computer graphics model designed to control, constrain and simulate special motions in a three-dimensional system is described. With the help of a model like this, professionals could ease the problems of dealing with the special client. Handicapping and disabling factors relevant to the design process can be explored through the comparison of normal and abnormal simulated motion conditions.

  • Human Factors Simulation

  • Design
  • computer graphics and motion
  • scoreLight
  • Alvaro Cassinelli, Masatoshi Ishikawa, Yusaku Kuribaka, and Daito Manabe
  • SIGGRAPH Asia 2009: Adaptation
  • 2009 Cassinelli: scoreLight
  • scoreLight is a musical instrument capable of generating sound from the lines of doodles as well as the contours of three-dimen¬sional objects (hands, silhouettes, architectural details). There is no camera or projector: a laser spot explores the shape just as a pick-up head searches for sound over the surface of a vinyl record, with the significant difference that the groove is generated by the contours of the drawing itself.

    The preferred mode of operation is contour following. Each con¬nected component of the image functions as a sound sequencer. Sound can be generated in the following ways:

    • Pitch is controlled by the inclination of the lines, which generates a melody. Rotating the drawing transposes the melody to a higher or lower pitch. Tempo is determined by the length of the contour.
    • Pitch is continuously modulated as a function of curvature of the lines. This mode of operation enables one to hear the “roughness” of the drawing.
    • Bumps: extreme curvature indicates corners of the drawing. They trigger specific sounds (percussion, glitches, etc).

    Other modes of operation include bouncing on the lines with and without “gravity.” Sequences can be recorded and reused in the form of drawings (on stickers, for instance). The purity of the laser light and the fluidity of the motion make for a unique interactive experience that cannot be reproduced by the classic camera-projector setup.

  • Sound Art
  • Photo Finish at the Brickyard
  • Alvy Ray Smith
  • SIGGRAPH 1990: Digital Image-Digital Cinema
  • 1990
  • 1990 Smith Photo Finish at the Brickyard
  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • photograph
  • 6.5 x 5"
  • R. Theta/Red
  • Alvy Ray Smith
  • SIGGRAPH 1981: Art Show ’81
  • 1981
  • Smith: R Theta Red
  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Photograph
  • 10 x 14"
  • Face
  • Alyce Kaprow
  • SIGGRAPH 1985: Art Show
  • 1984
  • 1984 Alyce Kaprow Face
  • Hardware: Perkin Elmer 3220, Grinnell frame buffer
    Software: VLW “SYS”

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Cibachrome print
  • 16 x 20 in.
  • Fazes
  • Alyce Kaprow
  • SIGGRAPH 1986: A Retrospective
  • 1983
  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Photograph
  • 16 x 20"
  • Matthew__3
  • Alyce Kaprow
  • SIGGRAPH 1986: A Retrospective
  • 1984
  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Photographic print
  • 16 x 20 in.
  • Two_Bignums
  • Alyce Kaprow
  • SIGGRAPH 1986: Painting in Light
  • 1984
  • Image Not Available
  • Installation
  • Photograph of raster image
  • Two_Foto 8A
  • Alyce Kaprow
  • SIGGRAPH 1986: Painting in Light
  • 1984
  • Image Not Available
  • Installation
  • Photograph of raster image
  • Untitled
  • Alyce Kaprow
  • SIGGRAPH 1983: Art Show
  • 1983
  • 1983 Kaprow Untitled 01
  • Hardware: Perkin-Elmer 3230, Ramtek 9300, Matrix 2000 camera
    Software: Walter Bender and the artist

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • C print
  • 20 x 24 in.
  • c-print
  • Untitled
  • Alyce Kaprow
  • SIGGRAPH 1983: Art Show
  • 1983
  • 1983 Kaprow Untitled 02
  • Hardware: Perkin-Elmer 3230, Ramtek 9300, Matrix 2000 camera
    Software: Walter Bender and the artist

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • C print
  • 20 x 24 in.
  • c-print
  • Toroidal Knot
  • Alyn P. Rockwood
  • SIGGRAPH 1987: Art Show
  • 1987 Rockwood Toroidial Knot
  • Mathematics is the language of science, of investigation. Ideas which are described by it can be manipulated and synthesized to create new ideas. Mathematical models can be generated which correspond to objects familiar to us because of our experience in the real world. When this is done, we often discover that we have tread serendipitously into the realm of art.

  • Hdw: VAX 11/780/E&S PS340
    Sftw: By artist

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Photo
  • 8" x 10"
  • Leading Memory
  • Amanda Ervin
  • SIGGRAPH 2003: CG03: Computer Graphics 2003
  • 2003
  • 2003 Ervin: Leading Memory
  • With new technologies emerging that will impose new thought patterns on our culture, one could easily imagine a situation where cameras using pattern recognition become decision makers for a lot of what we do. Without a human built database full of childhood (and adult) memories and ideas, a camera can only make so many associations on an absolute level.

    This work utilizes pattern-recognition technology to interpret the physical world. Key characters from an image representing a memory are replaced by images the computer has recognized as being those characters. If saved as part of an empty database, as in this situation, the abstract results impose new possibilities for what that memory might now be. When the program recognizes certain shapes as sad, happy, or arrogant, these abstract shapes take on an entirely new meaning.

    Exaggeration of these ideas becomes a ridiculous parody of human interpretation. However, it’s not such an outrageous stretch when compared to our own approach to categorizing and evaluating a given situation and its elements.

    The system used to create this work was attached to a computer capable of accessing much more information than human recollection and much more immediately via the internet or any other database. The experience of proof is lost through this process, and the computer has only the absolute word of its programmers to shape its understanding.

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • 16 in x 49 in
  • memory, pattern, and technology
  • Silly Faces
  • Amanda Long
  • SIGGRAPH Asia 2011: FANTAsia
  • Long: Silly Faces
  • Silly Faces is an interactive video installation in which the viewers create their own 5 second movie. The video uploads immediately to a grid on the wall, an animated mosaic of faces. Everyone is a star. The video mural shows the 65 most recent videos, moving portraits of the audience looping back and forth. Silly Faces was commissioned for the show Yinz Play by the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh. The interaction of pressing a button on an arcade to record the video makes a fun, social and potentially intimate relationship between the audience playing and the video technology. When a new video is recorded it “bumps” the previous video to the left. The movies are saved into a database in the computer. Custom software enables a collaboration between myself and the audience, creating an evolving animated mural, blurring the line between artist, performer, and spectator. Silly Faces will act as a visualization of the temporary community that comes together at SIGGRAPH. The mural is composed from the audience’s faces and bodies, creating a family or class portrait of the visitors. The playfulness of making a silly face is a unifying gesture that people of all ages and cultures can enjoy.

  • Installation and Interactive & Monitor-Based
  • Botanicula
  • Amanita Design
  • DAC Online Exhibition 2014: Aesthetics of Gameplay
  • DAC2014 Amanita Design: Botanicula 1
  • Botanicula is a point’n’click exploration game created by the makers of award-winning Machinarium – studio Amanita Design and Czech band DVA. Five friends, little tree creatures, set out on a journey to save the last seed from their home tree which is infested by evil parasites.

    Key features:

    -relaxed game perfect for hardcore gamers, their partners, families and seniors;
    -more than 150 detailed locations to explore;
    -hundreds of funny animations;
    -incredible amount of hidden bonuses;
    -fantastic music and sound effects by alternative band DVA;
    -not one but five main characters with various skills and personalities;
    -no text or lengthy dialogs to bore you;
    -bonuses for vigilant players at the end of the game.

  • Interactive & Monitor-Based
  • http://botanicula.net/
  • Blowout
  • Amber Denker
  • SIGGRAPH 1986: Painting in Light
  • 1984
  • Installation
  • Photograph of raster image
  • Isolation/Inspiration
  • Amber Denker
  • SIGGRAPH 1986: Painting in Light
  • 1984
  • Image Not Available
  • Installation
  • Photograph of raster image
  • Nagasaki I
  • Amber Denker
  • SIGGRAPH 1985: Art Show
  • 1985
  • 1985 Amber Denker Nagasaki I
  • Hardware: VAX 11/780, Genisco frame buffers
    Software: P. Heckbert, F. Parke

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Print
  • 20 x 24 in.
  • Untitled
  • Amber Denker
  • SIGGRAPH 1986: Painting in Light
  • 1985
  • Image Not Available
  • Installation
  • Photograph of raster image
  • Mount Qaf: A Multimedia Performance Installation Infusing Electronic Art and The Sonic and Visual A
  • Amir Ghahary, Mark Nazemi, and Diane Gromala
  • SIGGRAPH Asia 2011: FANTAsia
  • Ghahary, Nazemi, Gromala: Mount Qaf: A Multimedia Performance Installation Infusing Electronic Art and The Sonic and Visual A
  • Mount Qaf is an audiovisual performance installation and a spatial/temporal structure which expresses the aesthetic dimensions of Sufism and electronic music culture. The experience combines generative digital art based on animating Persian patterns with eastern architectural motifs including Muqarnas, in syncopation with an ethnic electronic soundscape encountered through multi-channel acoustics. By re-imagining the traditional aesthetics of Sufism through the lens of electronic art and digital culture, the visual music journey of Mount Qaf sacralizes a nostalgia for the ancient past as well as reverence for an expectant technological future.
    As children of parents who immigrated from Iran, the artists are therefore participating in a space reminiscent of their spiritual heritage while remaining clothed in the fabric of their technological upbringing. In the culture of Persian Sufism, the sense of place which emerges from visual and acoustic aesthetics reflects the alam-i-mithal, or the transcendent Imaginal Realm. To this end, spiritual cultures have always fashioned tools and instruments intended to sacralize space and affect a sense of identity and belonging. Today, electronic and digital media constitute an emerging palette with which the notion of sacred space can be explored. In this way, this multimedia performance installation invites viewers to experience a novel cultural space and consider the mystery surrounding the transcendent sense of home.

  • Installation and Performance
  • Sonic Wire Sculptor
  • Amit Pitaru
  • SIGGRAPH 2005: Threading Time
  • 2005
  • Sonic Wire Sculptor allows users to draw three-dimensional wire sculptures that produce audio in surround sound. By using a pen on a screen, users experience tangible audio/visual events as they explore new connections between the two media.

  • Interactive & Monitor-Based
  • Projection, surround-sound system, Wacom Cintic, custom-made kiosk
  • Room 15 feet x 20 feet
  • June 8th, 2018 (Take 2)
  • Amy Alexander and Curt Miller
  • DAC Online Exhibition 2018: The Urgency of Reality in a Hyper-Connected World
  • 2018
  • June 8th 2018 (Take 2) is an improvised film recorded in real-time by Amy Alexander and Curt Miller. Amy Alexander performs using PIGS (Percussion Image Gestural System), her system for improvising real-time animation from pre-recorded video by drawing gestures and striking drums. Curt Miller performs with his system, The Farm (clarinet, talk box, and custom software.

    The video content of June 8th 2018 (Take 2) was composed from over one hundred YouTube vlogs and other videos uploaded by the public that day (June 8th, 2018). The videos were selected by an “AlgoCurator” algorithm, written by Amy Alexander. The AlgoCurator implements a non-cynical search algorithm to seek out the Internet’s lost Utopia by thwarting social media popularity algorithms to reveal the videos of the moment nobody gets to see. Over one hundred YouTube vlogs and other videos are selected from among all public uploads to YouTube in the hours before the recording. The AlgoCurator uses computer vision and other strategies to select some of the least popular, least slickly produced, primarily personal, videos of the day.

    Commercial social media algorithms seek to tell us what’s “relevant,” but often simply amplify and popularize the sensational and profitable. The AlgoCurator attempts to push against these popularity algorithms to reveal quieter, overlooked voices. The videos selected by the AlgoCurator ultimately represent a range of presentations and points of view from various parts of the globe: adults and children, commercial and confessional, polite and offensive. A generation into the hyperbolic reality-TV era, restraint — and even blandness — can seem like acts of resistance. Search rankings ultimately skew our view of our social media counterparts, exacerbate tensions, and create a potentially self-fulfilling image of contemporary reality in which society is reduced to intractable social and political divisions. The AlgoCurator, in seeking videos with very low view counts, actively works against popularity algorithms to uncover YouTube’s quieter realities.

    Loosely provoked by Stan VanDerBeek’s idea of the “Culture Intercom” — a proposed global video network in which people from around the world would come to understand each other by sharing videos — the initial implementation of the AlgoCurator, Utopian Algorithm #1, raises comparisons between YouTube and the utopian video network of global unity envisioned by VanDerBeek. While VanDerBeek’s 1960s proposition focused on content and transmission, the evolution of contemporary online “big data” networks reveals the search algorithm to be as critical to our experience of the network as the content.

  • Animation & Video
  • Film
  • http://amy-alexander.com/2018/07/new-pigs-film-june-8th-take-2/
  • A Battle of Nude Men #2
  • Amy Bassin
  • SIGGRAPH 1986: Painting in Light
  • 1985
  • Image Not Available
  • Installation
  • Photograph of raster image
  • Never Alone: The Art and the People of the Story
  • Amy Fredeen and Dima Veryovka
  • SIGGRAPH 2018: Original Narratives
  • 2014
  • We paired world-class game makers with Alaska Native storytellers and elders to create a game that delves deeply into the traditional lore of the Iñupiat people to present an experience like no other. Never Alone is our first title in an exciting new genre of “World Games,” which draws fully upon the richness of unique cultures to create complex and fascinating game worlds for a global audience.

  • Interactive & Monitor-Based
  • http://elinemedia.com/never-alone/
  • Untitled #38
  • Amy K. Jenkins
  • SIGGRAPH 1991: Art and Design Show
  • 1990
  • Hardware: Sony Mavika digital camera, Apple Macintosh IIfx.
    Software: Adobe Photoshop.

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Photographic print
  • 16 x 20
  • HandShake
  • Amy M. Youngs
  • DAC Online Exhibition 2016: Science of the Unseen: Digital Art Perspectives
  • 2016
  • 2016 Youngs: HandShake
  • I create situations that make visible – and palpable – the connections between the human and non-human. Immersed within participatory artworks, or in networks that include machines, plants or animals, the human experiences self as a mutually dependent being, intermeshing and intermingling with the non-human parts.

    In HandShake, I performed a three-hour handshake on live broadcast webcam as a way to acknowledge composting worms as important ecological partners. Worms are difficult to see, as they hide from visible light, which is harmful to them. This handshake was staged inside a dark box illuminated by an infra-red light which was invisible to my eye and to the light detectors of the worms, but sensed by the camera documenting the event. This extrasensory, technological agent allows us to see beyond our biological senses and it provides a view into the interconnected system that we participate in. The networked camera revealed the event as it unfolded in a three-hour timespan, but the span of human attention does not easily match this scale. I chose to time-lapse and color-enhance the documentation as a way to shift it towards human perception. I endeavor to employ technology in this way; as a means of highlighting the interdependent systems that include all of us – worms, people, dirt, cameras and ecosystems. These worms are the continuation of a colony of worms that have been with me for twenty years. We have shared many meals. They have transformed my waste products into fertilizer that I have fed to my plants. Once in awhile, when I bite into the juiciest strawberry, I remember to thank the worms for their part.

  • Media Used: Video, Music by Matt Ogborn.

  • Animation & Video
  • Video
  • 5:10 min.
  • Life and Death of Energy- Autonomous Devices
  • Anab Jain and Alex S. Taylor
  • SIGGRAPH 2008: Slow Art
  • 2008
  • 2008 Jain & Taylor Life and Death of Energy fig 2
  • Technology is often touted as the solution to a host of problems, not least our over-reliance on fossil fuels and the spectre of global warming. But what will it be like to live with the emergent technologies that are being devised to combat these threats? It seems the proposed solutions, and especially the more experimental and speculative, have the potential to alter our relationships with technology (sometimes radically). Take, for example, some of the efforts to rethink the production and consumption of power. These proposals not only move us away from consuming oil, coal, gas, and the like. They also allude to machines that will operate at a very different pace and rhythm because of their energy-production cycles. This installation encourages audiences to consider one such alternative to power production, namely microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and, in doing so, encourage reflection on a broader class of so-called “energy autonomous” technologies.

    MFCs rely on the breakdown of organic material by a microbial substrate and production of an electrical charge via this process. The organic material might be a simple compound (for example, sugar or something more complex such as fruit, vegetables, or even insects). The substrate can consist of sludge similar to that found in the common pond.

    Our installation presents a range of artifacts and media designed to encourage questions and debate around the developments in energy autonomous systems and their use. One collection of artifacts consists of three electricity-producing objects designed to be fueled using sugar (Fig. 1). These sugar-based objects provoke questions about our relationship with power sources that contain living microbes, but that have a fixed life span.

    Another of our designs considers the production of electricity by incorporating the cells into a radio appliance (Fig. 2). Unlike the sugar-based cells, the radio is designed to run on cells that will last indefinitely, so long as they are supplied with organic material. This promised longevity of power supply is one of the distinctive features of MFCs. Our radio is designed to use a microbial substrate that will break down most organic material, including complex materials. Through this process, the microbial substrate is conditioned over time to operate most efficiently with particular sources of energy. This conditioning is related, in part, to the history of the materials the cells are supplied with. Thus the radio’s life cycle and performance interleaves with its usage patterns and the timeframe of use, both expanding well beyond the immediate interactions one has with the radio.

  • Installation
  • Congress
  • Anatoli Tsibin
  • SIGGRAPH 1995: Digital Gallery
  • 1995
  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Ink jet print
  • 26 x 18 cm
  • The Dream Machine
  • Anders Gustafsson and Erik Zaring
  • DAC Online Exhibition 2014: Aesthetics of Gameplay
  • DAC2014 Gustafsson, Zaring: The Dream Machine 1
  • The Dream Machine is an award-winning point & click adventure in six chapters made out of clay and cardboard. You play as Victor Neff, the husband in a young couple who’ve just moved into a new apartment. While trying to settle in they discover that all is not as it seems in the quiet, unassuming building.

    – World: Explore a creepy apartment complex and uncover the mysteries within;
    – Story: Delve into the minds of strangers and loved ones as you’re trying to save them from The Dream Machine;
    – Graphics: Wander around beautifully detailed environments built using physical clay models and hand-crafted sets;
    – Puzzles: In order to progress you have to solve puzzles, ranging from simple pushovers to fiendish brainteasers;
    – Music: A haunting original soundtrack weaves through the narrative, emphasizing the surreal atmosphere of the game;

  • Interactive & Monitor-Based
  • http://www.thedreammachine.se/
  • Horse Study
  • Andrea Losch
  • SIGGRAPH 1990: Digital Image-Digital Cinema
  • 1990
  • 1990 Losch Horse Study
  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • photograph
  • 20 x 16"
  • N.
  • Andrea Polli and Joe Gilmore
  • SIGGRAPH 2007: Global Eyes
  • 2007
  • “What may not be expected in a country of eternal light? I may there discover the wondrous power which attracts the needle and may regulate a thousand celestial observations that require only this voyage to render their seeming eccentricities consistent forever.” – Mary Shelley, Frankenstein The North Pole. 90 degrees north. A point where the spinning of the Earth slows to zero, where every direction points South, and the sun rises and sets just one time each year. The North Pole is a symbol of the fusion of opposites, combining natural beauty and brutality, “the last imaginary place on Earth.” N., by examining the North Pole in real time, expresses the isolation and environmental extremes of this remote region and addresses the importance of the region to the global ecosystem. N. is an ongoing, evolving composition. Because it is directly tied to the turbulent weather of the Pole, the composition is ever changing, transforming in completely unexpected ways. N. unfolds and evolves on a climatological temporal scale, far beyond an individual human lifetime. N. was made possible, in part, by a 2005 Lovebytes Festival Commission, Sheffield, UK. It was selected from over 2,600 entries for the renowned VIPER International Awards and was featured at the VIPER International Festival for Film and New Media in Basel, Switzerland. It was also featured in The Drop, an exhibition of works addressing global water supply at ExitArt, New York, and in an exhibition of Polli’s works at the Beall Center for Art + Technology.

  • N. presents a sonification of Arctic weather data modeled specifically for this project by Patrick Market, meteorologist and snow and ice specialist at the University of Missouri, and imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Arctic research program in a sound and visual representation of the climate and conditions at the North Pole from 2003-2006. A portion of the sound used in N. comes from live atmospherics and global electromagnetic transmissions of lightning from the INSPIRE VLF receiver at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. Audio engineered at Harvestworks, New York City by Ken Babb. Supported, in part, by a PSC-CUNY Research Foundation Grant.

  • Interactive & Monitor-Based and Sound Art
  • Computer projection and sound
  • Intuitive Ocusonics
  • Andrea Polli
  • SIGGRAPH 2001: n-space
  • 2000
  • “Intuitive Ocusonics” is the five-year effort of Andrea Polli (www.andreapolli.com), an experimental programmer, sound artist, and technologist who takes social implications of new technology to the extreme. She is a neo-concretist, merging and re-framing ideas of concrete art, music, and poetry. “Intuitive Ocusonics” melds visual and aural information through high end data transfer and tracking technology first developed by the US military. “Intuitive Ocusonics” is a continuing experiment into visual and tactile perception, motion, and response.

    “Rapid Fire” is an improvisational collaborative sound performance focusing on the exploration and implementation of “Intuitive Ocusonics,” a process in which voluntary and involuntary eye movements create a visual and aural landscape. “Rapid Fire” turns the voyeuristic lens back on itself by tracking the observer – a “virtual fire.”

    Seeing is active. Vision itself cannot occur without finely tuned movements of the eye, taking in patterns of light and color on the retina which the mind must then translate into a coherent world. In all cultures, the eyes are used to convey a wide variety of messages. Currently, technological means of communication often lack the speed to communicate the subtleties of these movements or don’t employ them at all. “Intuitive Ocusonics” attempts to return the power of active seeing.

    There is a considerable body of research on eye movements. Such movements have two major functions: fixation, to position target objects to the center of vision; and tracking, to keep fixated objects in the center of vision despite movements of the object or the observer. Eye movements can further be divided into three distinct types that can be under voluntary control: convergence, smooth pursuit, and saccades.

    Saccadic movements, used primarily in the performance, are rapid jumps of the eye used to shift gaze to a chosen object. Saccadic movements are very fast, typically taking only 30 milliseconds to complete, and reaching speeds of 900 degrees per second. An increase in the speed of saccades can be learned or trained with daily practice, and many researchers indicate that saccades are planned, controllable activities.

    Fixation occurs in the intervals between saccades. Intervals between saccades can be as long as several seconds during steady fixation; and in reading, about three times each second. Even when fixating, the eyes continue to move. They tend to drift and flick involuntarily and to oscillate back and forth continuously, although these movements are extremely small. The “Intuitive Ocusonic” system also utilizes these intervals by employing a timed gaze as the manner of interaction.

    Are all eye movements voluntary? There is not a clear demarcation between voluntary and involuntary eye movements. It is known that the mechanism for eye movement is different than the mechanism for known voluntary movements of the body, and many steps in the pathways for eye movements are still unknown. When interacting with media, humans blink less, displaying a fixed stare not unlike gazing at an object of love or adoration.

  • Performance
  • Performance
  • data, motion, movement, perception, and technology
  • Queensbridge Wind Power
  • Andrea Polli
  • SIGGRAPH 2006: Intersections
  • 2006 Polli Queens bridge Wind Power
  • The Queensbridge Wind Power project presents a vision of a future when meeting energy production needs can actually enhance the beauty of a city. It investigates how clean, renewable wind power might be integrated into the landmark architecture of the Queensboro Bridge, New York City. The project is designed to engage the community in a dialogue about the potential of wind and other alternative energies in an urban setting.

  • Andrea Polli conceived of this piece as part of New York 2050, a project to actively involve the people of metropolitan New York in a dialogue about the future and to develop the resulting visions into programs for action to guide short-term decision-making (see www.ny2050.org). During that large-scale project, she worked closely with climate scientist Cynthia Rosenzweig and a team of scientists at the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies and Columbia University’s Climate Impacts Group and learned of the wide-ranging effects climate change will have on the New York region. The Queensbridge Wind Power project is her response.

  • Morgan Barnard and Markus Maurette
  • Animation & Video
  • DVD
  • The Fly's Eye
  • Andrea Polli
  • SIGGRAPH 2003: CG03: Computer Graphics 2003
  • 2003
  • 2003 Polli: The Flys Eye 1
  • The Fly’s Eye (2002) creates an animated document of both space and time, and draws inspiration from the structure, function, and significance of the eye of the fly and other processes of vision. The history of a film or a live video feed is built in layers of position and image.

    Digital prints created have included:

    1. A lighting analysis of Fellini’s “8 1/2” in which the print is divided into a grid of 28 squares, each documenting a 10-minute section of the film layered over the previous 10 minutes.

    2. A lighting analysis of Bunuel’s “Un Chien Andalou,” in which the print is divided into three rectangles, each documenting a 5-10 minute section of the film.

  • The Fly’s Eye consists of a computer system designed to perform real-time spatial analysis and deconstruction of a video using a custom-designed interface. Each frame is tracked and analyzed according to the location of light, color, or motion in the frame. A copy of each frame is placed in a grid according to the results of the analysis, and a live animation is created.

  • Animation & Video
  • Two works: 42 in x 63 in each
  • time and vision
  • Third Skin
  • Andrea Zapp
  • SIGGRAPH 2011: Tracing Home in The Age of Networked Techniques
  • 2011
  • “Analogue becomes the new Digital” in Andrea Zapp’s experiments in textile media narratives. Her work explores digital media and the mapping of collective space through fabric print, image patterns, embroidery techniques, and ocher formats of physical object and embellishment. Third Skin captures imagery of our social, digital, and urban neighborhoods and interiors and transfers chem to fabric and dress design. Zapp plays with Marshall McLuhan’s idea of “clothing being an extension of skin, the way that media are an extension of the body.” In these pieces, photography, surveillance, and online footage become the sources for hand-manufactured dresses as media narratives. They map the collective and shared (images, digital and physical scenarios, and objects) onto the domestic: a one-off garment as individual statement and choice. Skin is explored as a media surface and as a metaphor for mapping and merging physical and digital realities. Zapp’s goal here is to establish a stronger emotional link between audience and media artwork. The virtual space is framed as the other place of memory and home by capturing it in analogue paraphernalia, modeled on and manufactured from the digital. Craft and media design objects and artifacts render the digital space domestic and decorative, but with the intention of provoking a surreal and paradoxical sense of longing and belonging to a parallel world. As Zapp suggests, “the idea of a digital habitat, a shared environment, is the main driving narrative in my installations, down to the actual physical architecture in many of my earlier works resembling physical living spaces, hotels, houses, and private webcam scenarios to create related metaphors.”

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • clothing
  • The Three Graces
  • Andreas Berner
  • SIGGRAPH 2004: Synaesthesia
  • 2004
  • In my thesis project, “The Three Graces,” I tried to bring each of the graces to life, from their individual creation as one of the elements �re, water, wind) to their final destination as a “reunited” statue, forming the symbolic embrace of unity. Once again, they are frozen in time.

    The three graces of Greek mythology represent the quintessence
    of art and dance for me, and artists throughout history have been inspired by them. The beauty of the human form and the body in motion are expressed best through the art of dance. I am inspired by the gracefulness of the three graces and the ancient metaphors of liberality and unity they stand for.

    e original dance sequence was conceptualized and choreographed with Ayo Janeen Jackson, currently a dancer at the Bill T. Jones Dance Company. She was the representative dancer for all three graces and performed the dance movements in a motion capture session with Acclaim. The animation was further fine tuned with

    key frame techniques, and the final rendering of the characters was achieved through expressive pa icle systems in Maya.

    The work is homage to and reminiscent of the early works of the ‘Fantasia” artists and German expressionistic animators like Oskar Fischinger.

    This project was achieved within the three months of my final semester at NYU’s Center for Advanced Digital Application in Spring 2003.

  • Tools used include: Motion Capture, 3D modeling and particle systems in Maya, 2D compositing in After Effects, Combustion, and Final Cut Pro.

  • Animation & Video
  • Animation
  • Length 2:45 minutes
  • Capacitive Body
  • Andreas Muxel and Martin Hesselmeier
  • SIGGRAPH Asia 2009: Adaptation
  • 2009 Muxel: Capacitive Body
  • This modular light system reacts to the sound of its environment. Each custom-built module consists of an electro-luminescent light wire linked to a piezoelectric sensor and a microcontroller. Its modular setup makes it easily adaptable to various urban spaces.
    The sensors are used to measure vibrations of architectural solids in a range of low frequencies. These oscillations are triggered by surrounding ambient noise, for example traffic sounds. The sensor data control the light wires, which are tensed to a spatial net structure. Light flashes are generated according to the values of the measurement. With increasing vibrations, the time between flashes becomes shorter and shorter. In the end, the stability of this nervous system collapses and restarts. The result is a dynamic light space that creates visual feedback of the aural activity around the installation.

  • Installation and Sound Art
  • Tracking evil businesses – The Megacorp. Business conglomerate
  • Andreas Zingerle and Linda Kronman
  • DAC Online Exhibition 2018: The Urgency of Reality in a Hyper-Connected World
  • 2015
  • Megacorp. is a corporate conglomerate inspired by its equally powerful counterparts in science fiction. The artwork is based on a collection of fake websites scraped from internet by the artist duo KairUs. These companies exist only virtually and are used by cyber criminals for phishing attacks or to support scam stories. The Megacorp. exists therefore as an umbrella company for subsidiary companies that are 100% dummy cooperations. Megacorp. operates on a global scale and is constantly growing with firms represented in almost every branch of industry. The strategic objectives according to the Megacorp. Mission statement is to: “offer complete services from one source which can serve the entire market”. Accordingly the subsidiary companies cover domestic and international export, real estate agents, insurance companies, law firms, security companies, banks, educational institutions, hospitals, online commerce, economic communities and ministries.The functions of Megacorp. are presented in the form of an interim report and company visuals. By examining the fake websites the artwork reflects both the imaginary and the real world ‘megacorps’, questioning centralization of power.

  • Interactive & Monitor-Based
  • http://megacorp.kairus.org/
  • Faceless Patrons
  • Andreas Zingerle
  • SIGGRAPH Asia 2013: Art Gallery
  • Faceless is an augmented reality installation questioning the trust we put in online representations and computer mediated communications. The artwork showcases fake bank checks and a series of photographs, through which one can access an augmented reality layer. The virtual layer exposes fragments of online traces in form of video and audio. A fraudster‘s identity is often based on either identity theft or a confusing mix of several existing individuals, giving them the opportunity to remain faceless and anonymous. The images in the augmented layer are the result of an online search in an attempt to confirm or invalidate the authenticity of the scammers’ online representations. For this project we created the fictional character‚ Anna Masquer, representative of an average contemporary artist that only exists as an online identity. Her photo series Faceless is a collection of faded and worn down images from abandoned graves – another kind of faceless; past away and forgotten, yet an identity to use and abuse. This collection is presented online and offered to art scammers, who, posing as gallerists or wealthy art buyers show their interest in the artwork. The gathered checks are physical evidence of fraudsters sending overpaid checks, tricking the artist into money laundering and advance fee fraud. Art trade as well as any other online commerce requires trust between the actors. This trust is often built upon virtual representations that allow an international market, yet leaves us vulnerable for abuse. The opportunities to sell products or services online makes us targets for online fraudsters, who use the anonymity of the internet to trick the victim into their story worlds.

  • Augmented Reality/Virtual Reality
  • Samalu
  • Andreas Zingerle
  • SIGGRAPH Asia 2012: Echo
  • 2012 Zingerle Samalu
  • “Samalu” finds inspiration in old folk believes and shaman rituals, but brings the meaning of mountain myths and worship into today’s contemporary Austria and Korea. A non-linear story around this theme explores how we in our highly modern societies are attached to the nature through the mountains. The natural interface constructed of a number of stones refers to stone piles found on hiking trails around the world, each stone concealing an unique story. By lifting one or several of the real fist-size stones the visitor can experience various myths from both countries and explore different mountain landscapes.

  • Installation
  • Interactive Installation
  • Solargrafica
  • Andreas Zingerle
  • SIGGRAPH 2008: Slow Art
  • 2008
  • 2008 Zingerle Solargrafica
  • Solargrafica records the paths of the sun by using a lens-less camera with exposure times up to five months. With this process, the invisible movements of the sun can be made visible as landscapes. A soundscape processed with granular synthesis samples creates a time-space relationship between light and sound. The visitor can interact with the sound by moving within the installation and focusing on the different camera modules.

  • Installation
  • Hear No Evil, See No Evil, Speak No Evil, XXXX No Evil
  • Andrew Bac
  • SIGGRAPH 2003: CG03: Computer Graphics 2003
  • 2003
  • 2003 Bak: Hear No Evil, See No Evil, Speak No Evil, XXXX No Evil
  • While artists visualize concepts, the works of art are structured by the characteristic nature of various media and materials that artists utilize. The astonishing visualizing power of the computer, on the other hand, has offered new aesthetic opportunities to many artists and designers by providing extensive sets of visual possibilities. It has suggested new notions of how to create, see, understand, and appreciate a work of art.

    More than anything, computer technologies allow me to explore the visual concepts as if I can actually interact with each part of the images. Many of my works are the results of countless mixtures and variations of images that are coming from various sources. The technology constantly pushes me to challenge the new ideas and deeper engagements. Most of all, computer graphics technology provides me endless possibilities of regenerating new developments and thus provokes new sets of visual concepts.

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • 72 in x 32 in x 2 in
  • computer graphics and technology
  • loft
  • Dr. Andrew Burrell
  • DAC Online Exhibition 2017: Immersive Expressions: Virtual Reality on the Web
  • 2017
  • Loft is a webVR narrative experience. It consists of a self contained environment that plays out for the viewer based on its own logic. With limited agency granted to them, the viewer’s role will initially feel like one of pure observations, but as the world unfolds around them, they will find that their point of observation, and how they choose to navigate the space, will make critical differences to how they experience the narrative and logic of this world.

    As well as investigating ways of presenting fragmented and abstract narratives within virtual reality, Loft explores an unusual aspect of virtual reality technology in its ability to be both immersive and distancing at the same time. It intentionally highlights the disembodied “head in a jar” feeling, while at the same time providing an abstract environment that invites exploration, immersion and the potential for a more visceral reaction to the space.

    Loft uses gaze based navigation. Use the pink cursor to look and select the ‘start’ icon, then use the same technique to gaze at the translucent pink diamonds that will appear and navigate through the space.

    On initiating the work, a number of virtual seeds are randomly spread around the environment, and begin to grow. At the same time an entity begins to fly through the space, exploring its own new environment. As the seeds mature they will flower, attracting the entity which will deliver fragments of spatialized audio narrative to each flower as it visits them. This flowers will eventually die and with them the fragments of audio. Over a period of approximately 6 to 7 minutes the world will come to life and then return to a state of quiet. The viewer can explore the resulting audio environment and in doing so mix the spatialized audio that surrounds them into their own unique narrative.

    Credits and Attribution: <http://miscellanea.com/artworks/loft>

  • Augmented Reality/Virtual Reality
  • WebVR
  • http://loft.miscellanea.com/
  • Da String Heads
  • Andrew C. Deck
  • SIGGRAPH 1992: Art Show
  • 1991
  • 1991 Deck Da String Heads
  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Laser printout
  • 8 x 8"
  • Euphrates Rising
  • Andrew Cziraki
  • DAC Online Exhibition 2016: Science of the Unseen: Digital Art Perspectives
  • 2016
  • 2016 Cziraki: Euphrates Rising 1
  • Religious and societal imprints are Cziraki’s main interest for creating works. Both have shaped our modern psyche and natural world, transforming them, evolving them and sometimes destroying them. His goal is to use the power of expression to create new associations between society, religion, and nature. Mesopotamia is labeled as one of the cradles of civilization. The evolutions of society and civilization have left their imprint on the environments that surround them. Euphrates Rising is a work constructed using water samples from the Hudson River located near Manhattan. The water was processed in order to isolate and culture bacteria present within said sample on nutrient agar plates. Various antibiotics were administered to growing cultures, such that natural resistance could be inferred.

  • Media Used: Hudson River Water sample, Digital print of sample cultured on nutrient agar plates.

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Digital Prints
  • Bion
  • Adam W. Brown and Andrew Fagg
  • SIGGRAPH 2006: Intersections
  • 2006 Brown Fagg Bion
  • Art and computer science converge in the investigation of emer­gence and self-organization through the field of sensor networks. This is realized in Bion, an interactive installation that explores the relationship between humans and a simulated orgone-inspired experience. Bion makes reference to an individual element of primordial biological energy identified as an “orgone” by the scientist Wilhelm Reich.

    Viewers witness a dynamic array of 1,000 mass-produced, three-dimensional glowing and chirping forms, collectively producing polyphonic sound and blue light emanating in cloud-like patterns from all parts of the room. Each bion, a small synthetic “life-form” fitted with custom electronics and sensors, has the ability to communicate with other bions and with humans who enter the space. An example of this communication occurs when one of the bions is alerted to the presence of a stranger; a bion quickly communicates this information to the group. One by one, in rapid succession, the bions signal other bions to the presence of a stranger and, in a wave-like pattern, become silent. Eventually, the bions become attracted to the visitor, and they express their interest with more intense glowing and increased polyphonic rhythms.

  • Each bion was initially realized through a 30 computer-aided design model. This digitally produced file was then output to a CNC (computer-numerical-controlled) machine, where an aluminum mold was made, creating an infinitely reproducible object via the rapid injection molding process. Each of the 1,000 bions is outfitted with custom circuits and Atmel Mega8 micro-controllers that are suspend­ed by fine-gauge wire connected to panels attached to the ceiling.

    Communication and visitor-proximity sensing is performed using a set of infrared transceivers (not unlike the technology used for television remote controls). Because this mode of communication is local, the system uses a broadcasting model for global communi­cation. Here, messages that are received by individual sensor nodes are rebroadcast to the local neighbors. This process is repeated until the message propagates throughout the network. All sensor nodes are identical in their implementation. However, when a node comes in contact with a visitor to the installation, it asserts itself as the network’s “interface” to that visitor. As the interface, this node is responsible for originating the set of messages that are used by the network to produce the coordinated response to the visitor.

  • Installation
  • Art installation, rapid-injection-molded plastic with custom electronics
  • 12' x 15' x 15'
  • Hawker, Hacker, Herald
  • Andrew Johnson
  • SIGGRAPH 2007: Global Eyes
  • 2007
  • Terry Eagleton recognizes that “among students of culture, the body is an immensely fashionable topic, but it is the erotic body, not the famished one. There is a keen interest
    in coupling bodies, but not in the labouring ones.” Hawker, Hacker, Herald responds to this neglect. It addresses issues of labor, access to technology, and challenges in communication. The International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), a specialized agency of the United Nations dedicated to eradicating rural poverty in developing countries, finds that 75% of the world’s poorest people live in rural areas and depend on agriculture and related
    activities for their livelihoods. It is often overlooked that agricultural workers, especially women and children, need suitable tools to save time and energy and increase agricultural productivity. Available tools are often too few
    and inefficient, especially because they are almost always designed to be used by men. Hawker, Hacker, Herald is a visual meditation on the gaps between these practical needs
    and realities and the aspirations of workers in an increasingly globalized economy. Hawker, Hacker, Herald aspires to the hyperreality of dramatic 19th-century landscapes of the American sublime, and like Frederic
    Edwin Church, gives pictorial voice to the political, social, and cultural issues of our era. It acknowledges the irony in the fact that food production has become a negative economy.
    In the Sisyphean futility of their tilling, farmers spend more on costly inputs for industrial production than they earn. Until computer hacking destabilizes systems of “wealth creation” that force odious debt on and increase mortality
    rates among real food producers, the harbingers of vengeance shall hew the horizon

  • These digital collages were produced from source material for an installation in progress consisting of animation video projections. Source imagery was created through lowtech
    methods and processes. Miniature dioramas, tableaux vivants, shoebox still lifes, and surfaces and textures constructed from cauliflower, pebbles, plastic eagle wings, clay, and Vaseline were fashioned to create cinematic experiences and images. These images were then digitally manipulated in hundreds of layers in Photoshop.

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Three digital collages
  • Dark Monarch Lingering Shroud
  • Andrew Polk
  • SIGGRAPH 1999: technOasis
  • 1998
  • This image from a series of fantasy investigations of the human head, explores the possibility that creatures are composed of other living creatures. Treating death and decay as reiterative stages in the continuum of life, it comments on the human desire to attach a higher meaning to life.

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Large Format InkJet on Lexan with Vinyl Backing
  • 60 inches x 45 inches
  • fantasy, ink jet print, and nature
  • Middle Passage
  • Andrew Scott
  • SIGGRAPH 1996: The Bridge
  • 1996
  • 1996 Scott Middle Passage
  • The notions of process, creative exploration, realization of form, and how we bridge the gap between objects created in the virtual environment and the real world are issues that I address in my work as an artist using computers. My artwork serves as a bridge through which I can reconcile and com­municate collective cultural ideals. These ideals are expressed as objects or instal­lations that have relevance and significance on a variety of levels to the society in which they exist. As a result, most of my work is conceptually based. Once a concept has been defined, I seek out and utilize whatever media and means facilitate the realization of my ideas.

    Within the context of my work, computer graphics technologies are used to facilitate the conceptualization of ideas. In this regard, I view myself as an artist who uses computers and not as a computer artist, since the concepts behind the work determine the technologies that are used to bring them into being. Having worked in a wide variety of computer graphics technologies while developing sculptural works that can stand on their own, I have begun to bridge the gap between the object itself and its formative process. Middle Passage exemplifies this approach.

    This is a pivotal work in my development. Thematically, the piece was created in the spirit of “Sankofa,” an Akan word that means “go back and fetch it”. On another level, it embodies the importance of going back to retrieve your past in order to prepare to step into the future, bridging the gap between past, present, and future.

    The Atlantic Ocean provides the impetus for many people’s mythology and history. For African-Americans, the ocean serves as an unmarked grave for six million Africans who died on slave ships traveling from Africa to the Americas. This middle passage marks a brutalizing rite of passage for African-Americans, whose ancestors both survived and perished in their forced journey across the waters.

    Middle Passage is a 9.5-foot steel rendition. It displays a symbiotic relationship between my work in sculpture and computer graphics. Starting as a series of still images and then as an animation short using image-processing software, I began to conceive of it as a sculptural form. Using a paint package, 3D modeling, and image-processing software, I was able to create the model for the finished piece.

  • Installation
  • communication, culture, and history
  • Virtual Babyz
  • Andrew Stern
  • SIGGRAPH 2000: Art Gallery
  • 2000
  • In her recent book, “Hamlet on the Holodeck: The Future of Narrative in Cyberspace,” Janet Murray suggests that interactive virtual characters “may mark the beginning of a new narrative format,” taking on the task of redefining what it means to be human in the face of artificial intelligence. This notion is fundamental to the design and implementation of Virtual Babyz, a CD-ROM program completed in October 1999.

    In Virtual Babyz, the user plays with and takes care of a group of autonomous virtual babies that live in a virtual house on the computer desktop. The Babyz are real-time 3D animated characters rendered in a cartoon-like style. Using a mouse to control a handshaped cursor, users directly touch, tickle, and pick up the Babyz, as well as pick up and use toys and objects in the virtual house. Through voice recognition, users speak simple words, and the Babyz listen to and understand their speech in real time. They learn to speak back in “baby talk.”

    The Babyz immediately respond to the user’s interactions with a variety of behaviors, depending on how the user interacts with them, how the Babyz feel at the time, and their individual personalities. A wide variety of body animations, emotional facial expressions, vocal sounds and baby-talk words are tightly integrated with a behavior-based artificial intelligence architecture. The result: characters that communicate their feelings and thoughts in a natural, performance-like way, rather than through traditional user-interface elements such as bar graphs, sliders, or text messages. Additionally, the characters have been specifically imbued with some long-term narrative intelligence, which further encourages users to experience their interactions as an ongoing “story.”

    In creating Babyz, we had two primary artistic and design goals. The first was to create the strongest interactive illusion of life we possibly could on a personal computer. This was achieved through a novel combination of a direct-interaction interface, expressive realtime 3D animation, and artificial intelligence programming that models goals, motivations, personality, and emotion. The final effect is surprisingly compelling, and it should be of interest to artists and technologists alike. Babyz are among the strongest, deepest implementations of virtual humans available to the general public to date.

    The second goal was to allow users to form emotional relationships with their Virtual Babyz. To achieve this, we chose characters that people recognize and understand how to interact with, presenting them in an unstructured, non-goal-oriented play context. The result is that users can easily suspend their disbelief and imagine that the Babyz are truly alive, so they feel empathetic, nurturing, and rewarded when interacting with the virtual characters, even over long periods of time. Users have already created over 100 Web sites for their adopted Babyz (www.babyz.net)

     

  • Installation and Interactive & Monitor-Based
  • Interactive installation
  • artificial intelligence, human-computer interaction, and interactive CD-ROM
  • Metascape: Villers Bretonneux
  • Andrew Yip
  • SIGGRAPH Asia 2019: Deep Dreaming
  • Dr Andrew Yip researches the applications of immersive environments and aesthetics to cultural heritage practice. His SIGGRAPH submission Metascape demonstrates new algorithmic processes for mapping, simulating and visualizing emotional memories, in this case those of a WWI battle. This work arises from art historical research into the visual culture of war representation as well as applied research into experimental interactive 3D visualisation. With a background in art history, museums, and 3D art, Andrew designs exhibition installations for galleries and museums. His virtual reality installation ‘Sidney Nolan’s Ned Kelly Unmasked: Virtual Reality’ won a 2018 Museums and Galleries Australia National Award, and his ‘Henry VR’ was the Art Gallery of NSW’s first virtual reality exhibition. Andrew is currently a post-doctoral research fellow at the iCinema Centre for Interactive Cinema Research, UNSW and previously held positions at the Laboratory for Innovation in Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums, UNSW, and the Art Gallery of NSW.

  • Interactive & Monitor-Based
  • CollageMachine: A Streaming Collage Browser Learns While You Surf
  • Andruid Kerne
  • SIGGRAPH 2001: n-space
  • 2000
  • “CollageMachine” is an information visualization browser. It proactively pulls interesting content. “CollageMachine” alters the granularity of browsing. It downloads documents and decomposes them into media elements – images and chunks of text – which stream into a collage. The user can rearrange the collage interactively. An agent models her interests.

  • Internet Art
  • Web Site
  • http://mrl.nyu.edu/andruid
  • collage and visualization
  • Entering the Event Horizon
  • Andrzej Zarzycki
  • SIGGRAPH 2001: n-space
  • 2000
  • Andrzej Zarzycki is an artist and architect who employs computer graphic tools to create and visually experience environments. Andrzej’s artistry is composed of two aspects: the sculptural – searching for excellence in form by computer simulated investigation of materials, light, and tectonics; and the imaginary – investigating the potential and desired representations of form. It is these two aspects that define Andrzej’s unique style of bridging the art of sculpture and painting.

    Andrzej believes that the most important aspect of his artistic process is exploration. The ability to work with materials, the interplay of light and form, creates opportunities which can best be captured through digital imagery.

    Andrzej’s environments explore the sculptural boundary of the possible with the impossible and utilize conventional architectural environments as a departure point. Frequently his creative approach leads him into imaginary worlds of pure exploration within the virtual environment. Using his ability to twist reality during the form-making process, Andrzej transforms conventional (as we know them now) into surrealistic spaces. The author strongly believes that once surrealistic spaces and virtual environments become more real to us, they will also affect our expectation of the surrounding environment.

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Color posters
  • 20 inches x 20 inches
  • computer graphics, imagination, and virtual environment
  • Texture of Reality No.7
  • Andrzej Zarzycki
  • SIGGRAPH 2007: Global Eyes
  • 2007
  • This study juxtaposes visual opposites. It captures the apparent contradiction that an accumulation of multiple objects with one distinct property (being sharp) can, on a larger scale, translate to an object with the opposite properties: a soft, luxurious element. This apparent paradox is a visual commentary, revealing deeper readings within nature and science, where individuality can emerge from a collage of anonymous components. Stability can emerge from interactions of chaotic states, and certainty can be a product of probabilistic uncertainty. Texture of Reality No.7 is one of a number of images developed from three-dimensional surface studies that focused on the relationship between the appearance of soft and hard forms within digital environments. The artist intentionally preserved the initial triangulation of the main surface and the visibility of individual faces to use them as visual building blocks for the overall image. These individual triangulations, traditionally seen as shortcomings in digital representation, can acquire visual merit by linking them to the overall composition and the overall intent of the image.

  • This imagery was created with form·Z 3D modeling software and rendered with Cinema 4D. The 3D model is made of a number of loft surfaces with spatial NURBS as guides. The final surface was rendered without smoothing or Phong shading properties to preserve the mesh triangulation as a critical visual component for the image.

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Computer graphics
  • 20 inches x 20 inches x 1 inch
  • The Collapse Series (No.4, No.10, No.3)
  • Andrzej Zarzycki
  • SIGGRAPH 2003: CG03: Computer Graphics 2003
  • 2003
  • 2003 Zarzycki: The Collapse Series No.4
  • This series of images is a bridge between the artistic and the scientific, between imagined and empirical. They result from close study of reflections and refractions in transparent objects with radiosity-based ray-tracing software. Realistic calculation and visualization of reflections could potentially make this a boring and mechanical tool, placing it more in the photographic than the artistic realm. However, asking the “right question” and pursuing “impossibilities” bring the study from purely scientific toward imaginative investigation.

    The intention behind my work is to use art as a vehicle to study and understand the world, along similar paths as science, converging on a holistic and unified vision for reality. Furthermore, this study, not unlike Cubist and Impressionist work, seeks to broaden the definition of reality beyond “the eye” of scientific instruments into the realm of human perception: vision, not physicality, defines the world around us. The so-called creative process results from convergence of creation and discovery, imagining new ideas, and registering unnoticeable facts. The result of my approach and the simulation ability of computer graphics is the “what if …” question.

    What if we could control the physicality of our world (time, behavior of light, properties of materials)? We could experience with our eyes what computer simulation is doing for us. These images seek to document that reality. The artistic quest was primarily focused on studying the reflections and refractions within the virtual environment. The aspiration here was not to mimic or test with computer models the reality we observe. Rather, it was to fill the gap of what everyday experience precludes us from seeing. The scientific quest was provided by specifying various initial conditions and setting up limits to light distribution.

    These images portray progressive refinement of an object by increasing a number of reflections. With each reiteration, light is allowed another bounce, thus revealing more and more of the object’s form. The imagery portrays what the world would look (be) like if we could see individual strokes of light distribution before they get a chance to interact with other surfaces, with each subsequent step being more refined and a closer portrayal of “final” reality. In the process of refinement, transparent objects can become temporarily opaque, and colors can behave as momentary attributes, not permanent properties.

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • ray tracing, reflection, and science
  • The Ornament of Grammar
  • Andy Kopra
  • SIGGRAPH 1995: Digital Gallery
  • 1995
  • 1995 Kopra Ornament
  • The “Ornament of Grammar” is a set of ten books of one hundred pages each that contain increasingly complex line drawings generated by a computer program. Each drawing is composed of a grid of thirty-six by thirty-six squares containing one of forty-two different patterns, or “tiles.” All tiles connect two, three or four of the midpoints of their edges, so that adjacent tiles can create apparently continuous lines. Individual pages are generated by choosing one tile from a subset of the forty-two for all grid positions. For each book, subsets of the forty-two tiles are defined for specific pages, called “targets.” The subsets used for all other pages are determined by linearly interpolating the probability of choice between the surrounding targets.

    The complexity of each successive book is increased by varying three parameters of the generating program. First, the visual quality of the tiles chosen for a book increase in complexity, from straight lines, to right angles, to diagonals, and finally to 90-degree arcs. Second, the number of tiles in a book’s targets increases throughout the books, from two in the first book, to all forty-two in the final book. Third, the number of targets also varies from two to five.

    The title, “The Ornament of Grammar,” is a reference to “The Grammar of Ornament,” a compilation of decorative patterns from various cultures compiled by Owen Jones in the nineteenth century. Jones’s work attempts to bring the rational order of empire and the encyclopedist’s myth of completeness to the subjective world of two-dimensional design. As the “reader” attempts to make sense of “The Ornament of Grammar,” however, the possibilities of rationalizing visual imagery are called into question by this encyclopedia of the arbitrary.

    But “The Ornament of Grammar” is not merely a critique of Jones’s work. In attempting to reduce the complexity of the visual materials and increase the complexity of the ways in which those materials are used, the work invokes the tradition of Structuralist filmmaking as practiced by Hollis Frampton and others in the 1970s. As one page to the next slowly changes in the probabilities of the chosen tiles, we see the surprising appearance of the continuous in the discrete, in which the similarity between pages is created not by appearance, but by the probabilities used in the page’s construction.

    “The Ornament of Grammar” by Andy Kopra. Ten books, 100 pages each. Original software by Andy Kopra. Software development in C on a Silicon Graphics Iris workstation at VIFX, Los Angeles. Camera-ready output produced on a NeXT computer and laser printer from PostScript.

  • Artist Book
  • 10 books made from paper
  • 8.5 x 8.5 x .5 inches (each book)
  • Aggregation
  • Andy Lomas
  • SIGGRAPH 2005: Threading Time
  • 2005
  • These works come from a fascination I have had for many years with the complexity of organic natural forms and their relationship to simple mathematical rules. Influenced by the work of D’Arcy Thompson, Alan Turing, and Ernst Haeckel, they study how the forms of plant and coral-like structures can be created by digital simulation using rules for flow and deposition.These sculptural shapes are created by a process of accretion over time. They are gradually grown by simulating the paths of millions of particles randomly flowing in a field of forces. Over time, they build on top of an initial simple seed surface to produce structures of immense complexity.

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Printed digital image
  • 15 inches x 15 inches
  • Aggregation 22
  • Andy Lomas
  • SIGGRAPH 2006: Intersections
  • 2006 Lomas Aggregation 22
  • This study is driven by a desire to explore the aesthetic and incred­ible intricacy of organic forms. The generated structures are created using a process of digitally simulated growth by aggregation. These cross-sectional views recall the internally segmented, cellular struc­tures of biological systems resulting in strong echoes of electron microscopy and Ernst Haeckel’s images of natural forms.

    Complex relationships between symmetry and asymmetry exist on many levels. The simple rules used to generate the simulations are inherently symmetrical in nature, but this symmetry is spontaneously broken by random processes in the growth algorithms. Radically different forms can be created by introducing small modifications to the generation rules and biases to the ways particles flow before they deposit on the aggregated structure. The intricate sculptural shapes created have what appear to be large-scale symmetries and similari­ties, but when they are examined in detail, it is apparent that no part is ever repeated, and nothing on a detailed level is in fact symmetric.

  • The base algorithms used to generate the forms are variations on Diffusion Limited Aggregation. Different structures are produced by introducing small biases and changes to the rules for particle emis­sion, motion, and deposition. The growth-like nature of the process, repeatedly aggregating on top of the currently deposited system, produces reinforcement of deviations caused by small forces applied to the undeposited particles as they randomly move. This means that small biases to the rules and conditions for growth can produce great changes in the finally created form.

    The rendered structures are implicit surfaces composed of many mil­lions of particles. Simulations can run from many days to weeks, with the final generated forms typically having between 30 and 50 million particle primitives. All the software used to simulate the structures and render the final images was written by the artist in Visual C+ +.

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Algorithmic image
  • 38" x 38"
  • Flow 19
  • Andy Lomas
  • SIGGRAPH 2007: Global Eyes
  • 2007
  • These images are composed of layered trajectories followed by millions of particles as they flow in fields of forces. Each individual trajectory is essentially an independent, random process, with the trail terminating when it reaches a deposition. Collectively, however, the paths combine to form delicate complex shapes of filigree and shadow in the areas of negative space that the paths don’t reach. At first glance, there appear to be definite shapes and forms outlined in the final images, but closer inspection reveals this effect to be ephemeral. Over time, as particles deposit they create a growing region that future particles will not be able to enter. Subtle shadow-like structures form in the areas that trails no longer reach, reflecting the growth of the termination zone. There are no actual defined boundaries, simply intricately structured gradients of tone formed by the end points of trajectories. These images can be seen as the natural duals of the Aggregation images exhibited at previous
    SIGGRAPH conferences. Whereas the images from the Aggregation series directly show the deposited structures themselves, these images illustrate the other side of the same processes: the paths followed by particles before they deposit.

  • The base algorithms used to generate the forms are variations on diffusion-limited aggregation. Different structures are produced by introducing small biases and changes to the rules for particle motion and deposition. The growth-like nature of the process, repeatedly aggregating on top of the currently deposited system, produces reinforcement of deviations caused by small forces applied to the undeposited particles as they randomly move. This means that small biases to the rules and conditions for growth can produce great changes in the finally created form. All the software used to simulate the structures and render the final images was written by the artist in Visual C++.

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Algorithmic image
  • 24 inches x 24 inches x 1 inch
  • Flow 9
  • Andy Lomas
  • SIGGRAPH 2007: Global Eyes
  • 2007
  • These images are composed of layered trajectories followed by millions of particles as they flow in fields of forces. Each individual trajectory is essentially an independent, random process, with the trail terminating when it reaches a deposition. Collectively, however, the paths combine to form delicate complex shapes of filigree and shadow in the areas of negative space that the paths don’t reach. At first glance, there appear to be definite shapes and forms outlined in the final images, but closer inspection reveals this effect to be ephemeral. Over time, as particles deposit they create a growing region that future particles will not be able to enter. Subtle shadow-like structures form in the areas that trails no longer reach, reflecting the growth of the termination zone. There are no actual defined boundaries, simply intricately structured gradients of tone formed by the end points of trajectories. These images can be seen as the natural duals of the Aggregation images exhibited at previous
    SIGGRAPH conferences. Whereas the images from the Aggregation series directly show the deposited structures themselves, these images illustrate the other side of the same processes: the paths followed by particles before they deposit.

  • The base algorithms used to generate the forms are variations on diffusion-limited aggregation. Different structures are produced by introducing small biases and changes to the rules for particle motion and deposition. The growth-like nature of the process, repeatedly aggregating on top of the currently deposited system, produces reinforcement of deviations caused by small forces applied to the undeposited particles as they randomly move. This means that small biases to the rules and conditions for growth can produce great changes in the finally created form. All the software used to simulate the structures and render the final images was written by the artist in Visual C++.

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Algorithmic image
  • 24 inches x 24 inches x 1 inch
  • Platypus Room
  • Angela Greene
  • SIGGRAPH 1985: Art Show
  • 1984
  • 1984 Angela Greene Platypus Room
  • Hardware: Via Video System IE
    Software: Time Arts

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Print
  • 11 x 14 in.
  • Loading Animated Version
  • Angie Waller
  • SIGGRAPH 2001: n-space
  • 2001
  • Not being paid for endless project revisions is an international affliction. “Loading Animated Version” documents the email correspondence between an American office specializing in streaming media and the design studio they hired in Hungary. To illustrate the contrast of management and labor, screen captures of American Flash animations are juxtaposed with found footage scenes of Eastern Europe typically presented on American television. This satirical dramatization of the exchange across the ether reveals the vast inequality between bottom-line managers and their dispensable labor force. “Loading Animated Version” demonstrates that dot-corns could potentially be no different from infamous manufacturing companies and their unethical disregard of good labor practice.

  • Animation & Video
  • Animation
  • communication and history
  • Evans vs. Weston
  • Anil Melnick
  • SIGGRAPH 1994: Art and Design Show
  • 1992
  • 1992 Melnick Evans
  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Iris inkjet print
  • 24 x 24 inches
  • The Pen is Mightier
  • Anil Melnick
  • SIGGRAPH 1994: Art and Design Show
  • 1993
  • 1993 Melnick ThePen
  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Iris inkjet print
  • 32 x 24 inches
  • "Laberint", from the series, "Postals de Barcelona"
  • Animática
  • SIGGRAPH 1992: Art Show
  • In Laberint, live action and computer-generated characters weave between real and virtual worlds. Two locations in Barcelona, Parc Laberint and the old Gothic Quarter, serve as inspiration. This piece draws from the ancient myth that woman and man were once androgynous form. Beginning in the Cave, woman and man split. They enter the Garden, then move on to life in the City. Trying again to become one, they take off into the future.

  • Hardware: SGI, Cyberware Laser Scanner
    Software: Wavefront, In-house

  • Animation & Video
  • 2:30
  • Artificially Motivated Objects
  • Ann Marion
  • SIGGRAPH 1985: Art Show
  • 1984
  • Image Not Available
  • Hardware: Atari 800
    Software: Custom Assembly Language

  • W. Harvey
  • Installation
  • Interactive sprite graphics, on-line display
  • I'm not there: extending the range of human sense to benefit wildlife corridors
  • Ann McNamara, Fred Parke, Carol Lafayette, and Philip Galanter
  • SIGGRAPH 2009: Information Aesthetics Showcase
  • 2009
  • How many experiences do we miss—either through inattention to our own limitations—when walking through the woods or diving with scuba mask and flippers? All around us, animals communicate and perceive with senses quite different from our own that have evolved from particular needs. Just as humans have employed technology to overcome limitations of physical strength, dexterity, and distance, so can we imagine technologies that enable us to extend our senses by taking cues from birds, whales, and other animals.

    In an immersive environment, users experience extended senses of sight, sound, and locomotion in ways normally perceived only by other animals. This is a prototype for a real-time project that provides freedom to roam through remote places with enhanced senses and, as a result, benefit wildlife corridors around the world. It uses scientific research as the basis for a study that will ultimately result in a real-time application.

    In the prototype, the user embodies the creature and experiences the world through a simulation of the creature’s audio, visual, and spatial sensations. Audio is manipulated to give a representation of the sensation experienced by the creature. Visual information is analyzed and re-represented to perceive spectra outside human range. Navigation through the world mimics the locomotion of specific creatures (flying, climbing, or swimming, for example). The project explores fundamental questions about our own mental, physiological, and technical interpretations. For example, it’s possible to imagine sound translated from beyond the ear’s frequency range, but what would it be like to sense electrical fields like a shark?

    The motivation for our study is a wish to encourage empathy with and curiosity about other species, the environment, and our place within it. Our larger ambition is to build an interactive real-time, global “nature channel.”

  • Augmented Reality/Virtual Reality
  • Super-organism: The Living Microbiome
  • Anna Dumitriu and Alex May
  • DAC Online Exhibition 2016: Science of the Unseen: Digital Art Perspectives
  • 2016
  • 2016 Dumitriu, May: Super-organism
  • “Super-organism” is an video artwork by Anna Dumitriu and Alex May, which reveals the microscopic bacterial microbiota growing on the human body. These invisible so called ‘normal flora’ bacteria are an important part of what it means to be human, integral to our immune systems, and may even affect our personalities. We are, in fact, super-organisms – whole ecosystems containing many more bacterial cells than human cells.

    This video installation juxtaposes close-up high definition macroscopic video footage of the growth of colonies of bacteria with images of the parts of the human body from which they were sampled. The piece shows the huge diversity of ways in which these bacteria grow and spread across a Petri dish filled with agar jelly (a seaweed based growth medium) and how they compete for ‘territory’, sometimes producing their own antibiotics to ward of other bacteria or producing biofilms which help them to spread. The human microbiome is a complex ecosystem that actually forms part of our immune system as our normal flora can prevent the growth of other more dangerous, pathogenic bacteria. However in certain circumstances our normal bacterial flora can cause disease and drug-resistant strains of bacteria, which exist in healthy people in the community, such as MRSA, can be a particular problem if they spread in a healthcare setting.

  • Media Used: HD video, DIY microbiology Techniques.

  • Animation & Video
  • 5:19 min
  • Bed Flora
  • Anna Dumitriu
  • SIGGRAPH 2005: Threading Time
  • 2005
  • I have been working in collaboration with scientists for over eight years, and over that time, I have become increasingly fascinated by microscopy and in particular bacterial life. Pathogenic bacteria have shaped the history of the world through plague and pestilence, but their non-pathogenic bacteria relatives help us in our everyday lives to perform mundane tasks such as digesting food. It is even suspected
    that mitochondria (the powerhouses in the heart of our cells) may even be bacteria that formed a symbiotic relationship with their host at the early stages of evolutionary development. I am currently working on a major project entitled Normal Flora, looking at the unseen microbial life that shares our world, and I am developing a performance-based installation piece. These Normal Flora prints have a paint-like quality that relates closely to my earlier work.

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • 16 inches x 20 inches
  • Lightjet print
  • Plate Flora
  • Anna Dumitriu
  • SIGGRAPH 2005: Threading Time
  • 2005
  • I have been working in collaboration with scientists for over eight years, and over that time, I have become increasingly fascinated by microscopy and in particular bacterial life. Pathogenic bacteria have shaped the history of the world through plague and pestilence, but their non-pathogenic bacteria relatives help us in our everyday lives to perform mundane tasks such as digesting food. It is even suspected
    that mitochondria (the powerhouses in the heart of our cells) may even be bacteria that formed asymbiotic relationship with their host at the early stages of evolutionary development. I am currently working on a major project entitled Normal Flora, looking at the unseen microbial life that shares our world, and I am developing a performance-based installation piece. These Normal Flora prints have a paint-like quality that relates closely to my earlier work.

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Lightjet print
  • 16 inches x 20 inches
  • Table Flora
  • Anna Dumitriu
  • SIGGRAPH 2005: Threading Time
  • 2005
  • I have been working in collaboration with scientists for over eight years, and over that time, I have become increasingly fascinated by microscopy and in particular bacterial life. Pathogenic bacteria have shaped the history of the world through plague and pestilence, but their non-pathogenic bacteria relatives help us in our everyday lives to perform mundane tasks such as digesting food. It is even suspected
    that mitochondria (the powerhouses in the heart of our cells) may even be bacteria that formed asymbiotic relationship with their host at the early stages of evolutionary development. I am currently working on a major project entitled Normal Flora, looking at the unseen microbial life that shares our world, and I am developing a performance-based installation piece. These Normal Flora prints have a paint-like quality that relates closely to my earlier work.

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Lightjet print
  • 16 inches x 20 inches
  • X and Y (number 2)
  • Anna Dumitriu
  • SIGGRAPH 2004: Synaesthesia
  • 2004
  • I used a Sony PC4E digital video camera to take the original still image, which was then transferred to my Macintosh G4 computer. Then, using Adobe Photoshop 7, I adjusted levels and enhanced the image, using gaussian blur, unsharp mask, and replace colour. The final image was professionally printed on photo glossy paper.

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Digitally enhanced photograph
  • 16 inches x 20 inches
  • X and Y (number 5)
  • Anna Dumitriu
  • SIGGRAPH 2004: Synaesthesia
  • 2004
  • For a long time, my work has been concerned with the subject of immortality. I am trying to develop an understanding of the scientific background of the subject, from HeLa Cells to genetic engineering and various other forms of therapy used to prolong life. I have created a large body of work based on Vitamin C molecules, human-cell biology, and DNA. I created a series of drawings and watercolours in the Genetics Department of St. Georges Hospital in London while looking at cells through a microscope. In particular, I looked at chromosomes. These experiences led me to create a series of digitally enhanced, “mocked-up” photographs of X and Y chromosomes. Some of the images appear frozen, which is a reference to cryonincs, the method of freezing the dead with the hope of re-animating them in the future when medical science has evolved.

  • I used a canon digital camera to take the original image, which was then transferred to my Macintosh G4 computer. Then, using Adobe Photoshop 7, I adjusted levels and enhanced the image. The final image was professionally printed on photo glossy paper.

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Digitally enhanced photograph
  • 16 inches x 20 inches with frame
  • Aengus
  • Anna Maria Chupa
  • SIGGRAPH 1997: Ongoings
  • 1996
  • 1996 Chupa Aengus
  • The historical sources for my use of compressed space, intricate surface, horror vacui, and valenced imagery are medieval manuscripts and reliquaries, Kongo minkisi, and Fon bocio. As different as they may be in form and media, the Celtic carpet pages and minkisi/bocio share a common aesthetic impetus of revelation and concealment, sensuous surface and mystical presence.

    Fon (Republic of Benin) and Kongo (Zaire) artist-priests create bocio and minkisi respectively as objects of personal empowerment. These power objects are assembled with a variety of layered objects, each alluding to medicine, healing, patron spirits, and the dead. Empowered with the forces of the spirits and the dead, the bocio/minkisi counter danger and hostility, promoting well-being in times of stress, (Blier, 1995:73-74) and healing psychologically induced illnesses. “Peacock” contains imagery designed for the protection of my children, while “Aengus” is more immediately self-referential.

    In “Aengus,” the border functions as a binding device that evolved as a personal journey to find containment and integration to counter memo­ries of dissolution. The title alludes to W.B. Yeats “Song of the Wandering Aengus,” where the apple blossoms and the quest for the glimmering girl are a quest for reclamation of a sense of self and lost faith.

    The remaining boxes combine personal narrative with imagery inspired by African Vodun, popularly known as Voodoo. American Voodoo evolved as a transformation of a number of African religious influences, Catholicism, and Spiritualism. Out of this, an aesthetic of spiritual objects and personal altars evolved.

    The hand-held altar is a gris-gris, created to be carried as a personal protection. My altar installations extend the reliquary metaphor to create a place for a communicative exchange between the spiritual world and the world of everyday life.

    “Brain Cell,” “At the Gates 2,” “Descanso,” and “Assumption” are images dedicated to Esu and Gede. Esu is the guardian of the gates. As such, he plays an important role in all significant moments in life when an individual or community is at a crossroads, and important decisions need to be made or actions taken. Esu is also the Loa (spirit) of commu­nication between human and divine forces. Finally, Esu is a trickster and a patron saint of rebel heroes who disrupt the status quo in order to bring about a greater and fuller social harmony. He is often represented as a mischievous child who likes things he can’t have (cigars, cigarettes, rum, matches) as well as toys and candy. Keys for Esu refer to his associ­ation with St. Peter. Conical figures with a cowrie shell lace are found in altars from Benin to Brazil, Trinidad, and the United States. Esu’s associ­ation with systems and networks is iterated in RJ45 connectors and similar items left on contemporary altars.

    Gede is closely related to Esu and is also associated with the crossroads, but more so with the junction between life and death. Gede imagery almost always includes cemetery crosses and skulls. His ability to see into two worlds positions him as the master of all healers. Gede is also the protector of infants and children. Together, these images are about defining moments and crossroads. They address issues of healing, empowerment, change. They are invocations, reflections.

  • Cone Editions Press
    Priestess Miriam Chamani
    Mississippi State University

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Iris Print on Translite lightbox
  • 19 1/2" X 13 7/8"
  • history, iris print, and religion
  • Altar
  • Anna Maria Chupa
  • SIGGRAPH 1996: The Bridge
  • 1996
  • 1996 Chupa Altar
  • An altar is a meeting place, a point of contact and intersec­tion between human beings and the divine. Damballah, Legba, Guede, and Erzulie are some of the major loa (spirits, mysteries) in the African-Haitian religion Vodun, popularly known as Voodoo or Hoodoo in New Orleans. Damballah’s symbols are the rainbow and the bridge; thus both the SIGGRAPH 96 location in New Orleans and the Art Show theme provide a focus for a Vodun altar installation. The main altar includes a central group of backlighted iris prints, with silk side panels. The space is defined by draped fabric forming a small proscen­ium stage. A secondary altar exists as a Web site with links to other sites containing related background informa­tion and imagery.

    A Vodun altar is created primarily by one designer but the final product is a collabora­tive effort. Once in place, the altar is never static. The work is thus both participatory and additive. SIGGRAPH 96 atten­dees can add elements to the altar in two ways: by photographing objects with a digital camera and adding them to the Web site, and/or by physically adding an object to the main altar. In either case, participants add personal commentary, and the altar grows from a personal devo­tion to a public offering.

    Scholars in the field are invited to contribute commentary or images to the Web site. Votive objects purchased ahead of time from local vendors will be available for the viewer to add, or viewers may choose to view the altar and then return with an object. Digitized contribu­tions will be added to the Web site with commentary from each donor. To invite broader participation beyond SIGGRAPH 96 attendees, con­tacts with community cultural outreach centers will be made in advance, and the Web site will identify related Vodun sites in New Orleans (e.g., Marie Laveau’s tomb) for visitors to the city.

    The loa occupy an intermediary position between human life and a supreme being. Translated, the word loa, or lawo, means mystery or spirit. Practitioners are initiated under the protection and guidance of one or more loa with whom they have some fundamental affinity. An altar is constructed for use in the con­text of an initiation ceremony and for subsequent obser­vances of the faith. Although Vodun and other African-­derived religions in the orisa-­loa tradition constitute a world faith, they are often misunder­stood and misrepresented as exotic cults with voodoo dolls and zombies. As intermed­iaries, each loa is a bridge between divine agency and human life. Legba is the guardian of the gates, path­ways, and communicative exchange. Guede is the loa of the cemeteries and occupies an intermediary position between life and death. Erzulie com­bines many of the qualities of the archetypal female that are separated in other Western traditions. She is Virgin, Prostitute and Mother. As Erzulie Ge-Rouge, she is the fury of the woman scorned; as Erzulie Freda, she is the virgin of miracles. Damballah is the loa associated with cosmic order and with the cycles of birth, life, death, and regeneration.

    Although Vodun, Santeria, and Candomble are distinct diasporic religions, still evolv­ing in Haiti, Cuba; and Brazil, respectively, they share some common African antecedents. I have drawn on common qual­ities in several altar traditions while attempting not to dilute or demean any of the specific and unique qualities of each.

    Some of the imagery, color coding, and symbolism incor­porated in this installation will be readily recognizable by Santerian and/or Vodun practi­tioners. Santerian altars or tronos utilize shapes suggested in the way fabric is draped to honor specific orisa. Fabric bunched in ripples on a ceiling evokes Osun’s waves. Sequined borders might refer to the froth of sea foam for Yemaya. Peaks of white fabric refer to Obatala’s more aloof position on a mountaintop (Brown, 1993). Haitian altars incorpo­rate chromolithographs of Catholic saints. A lithograph of St. Patrick is understood to represent Damballah. African orisa/loa traditions survived to a greater extent in Catholic set­tings, where it was possible to identify the loa with Catholic saints in order to avoid religious persecution.

    Vodun is nonexclusive (Thompson, 1993). Affinities with the symbols and imagery of other religious faiths (most notably Catholicism) are readily absorbed and reinterpreted. My altar borrows imagery from Buddhism, Catholicism, Vodun, and Santeria. After reading a brief overview of the content and symbols, viewers are invit­ed to add elements representa­tive of their own faiths that are aesthetically and thematically consistent with the installation as a whole.

    For the non-practitioner, the Web site decodes some of the Vodun imagery. Links to other sources of information on the Web will further instruct the non-initiate. African religions in the Americas have a consider­able following, yet they are still marginalized. The artists who construct these altars as private devotions or for public cere­mony are similarly relegated to the periphery. The altar and the accompanying Web site serve to instruct the public about the philosophy and origins of Vodun while making a link with a vital part of New Orleans culture.

    References
    David Brown, Thrones of the Orichas: Afro­Cuban Altars in New Jersey, New York and Havana, African Arts.Volume XXVI, No. 4 October, 1993.

    Robert Farris Thompson, Face of the Gods: Art and Altars of Africa and the African Americans, New York: The Museum for African Art, 1993, p. 20.

  • Installation and Interactive & Monitor-Based
  • history, interactive installation, and religion
  • Assumption
  • Anna Maria Chupa
  • SIGGRAPH 1997: Ongoings
  • 1996
  • 1996 Chupa Assumption
  • The historical sources for my use of compressed space, intricate surface, horror vacui, and valenced imagery are medieval manuscripts and reliquaries, Kongo minkisi, and Fon bocio. As different as they may be in form and media, the Celtic carpet pages and minkisi/bocio share a common aesthetic impetus of revelation and concealment, sensuous surface and mystical presence.

    Fon (Republic of Benin) and Kongo (Zaire) artist-priests create bocio and minkisi respectively as objects of personal empowerment. These power objects are assembled with a variety of layered objects, each alluding to medicine, healing, patron spirits, and the dead. Empowered with the forces of the spirits and the dead, the bocio/minkisi counter danger and hostility, promoting well-being in times of stress, (Blier, 1995:73-74) and healing psychologically induced illnesses. “Peacock” contains imagery designed for the protection of my children, while “Aengus” is more immediately self-referential.

    In “Aengus,” the border functions as a binding device that evolved as a personal journey to find containment and integration to counter memo­ries of dissolution. The title alludes to W.B. Yeats “Song of the Wandering Aengus,” where the apple blossoms and the quest for the glimmering girl are a quest for reclamation of a sense of self and lost faith.

    The remaining boxes combine personal narrative with imagery inspired by African Vodun, popularly known as Voodoo. American Voodoo evolved as a transformation of a number of African religious influences, Catholicism, and Spiritualism. Out of this, an aesthetic of spiritual objects and personal altars evolved.

    The hand-held altar is a gris-gris, created to be carried as a personal protection. My altar installations extend the reliquary metaphor to create a place for a communicative exchange between the spiritual world and the world of everyday life.

    “Brain Cell,” “At the Gates 2,” “Descanso,” and “Assumption” are images dedicated to Esu and Gede. Esu is the guardian of the gates. As such, he plays an important role in all significant moments in life when an individual or community is at a crossroads, and important decisions need to be made or actions taken. Esu is also the Loa (spirit) of commu­nication between human and divine forces. Finally, Esu is a trickster and a patron saint of rebel heroes who disrupt the status quo in order to bring about a greater and fuller social harmony. He is often represented as a mischievous child who likes things he can’t have (cigars, cigarettes, rum, matches) as well as toys and candy. Keys for Esu refer to his associ­ation with St. Peter. Conical figures with a cowrie shell lace are found in altars from Benin to Brazil, Trinidad, and the United States. Esu’s associ­ation with systems and networks is iterated in RJ45 connectors and similar items left on contemporary altars.

    Gede is closely related to Esu and is also associated with the crossroads, but more so with the junction between life and death. Gede imagery almost always includes cemetery crosses and skulls. His ability to see into two worlds positions him as the master of all healers. Gede is also the protector of infants and children. Together, these images are about defining moments and crossroads. They address issues of healing, empowerment, change. They are invocations, reflections.

  • Cone Editions Press
    Priestess Miriam Chamani
    Mississippi State University

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Iris Print on Translite lightbox
  • 18 3/4" X 15 1/2"
  • history, iris print, and religion
  • At the Gates 2
  • Anna Maria Chupa
  • SIGGRAPH 1997: Ongoings
  • 1996
  • 1996 Chupa Gates
  • The historical sources for my use of compressed space, intricate surface, horror vacui, and valenced imagery are medieval manuscripts and reliquaries, Kongo minkisi, and Fon bocio. As different as they may be in form and media, the Celtic carpet pages and minkisi/bocio share a common aesthetic impetus of revelation and concealment, sensuous surface and mystical presence.

    Fon (Republic of Benin) and Kongo (Zaire) artist-priests create bocio and minkisi respectively as objects of personal empowerment. These power objects are assembled with a variety of layered objects, each alluding to medicine, healing, patron spirits, and the dead. Empowered with the forces of the spirits and the dead, the bocio/minkisi counter danger and hostility, promoting well-being in times of stress, (Blier, 1995:73-74) and healing psychologically induced illnesses. “Peacock” contains imagery designed for the protection of my children, while “Aengus” is more immediately self-referential.

    In “Aengus,” the border functions as a binding device that evolved as a personal journey to find containment and integration to counter memo­ries of dissolution. The title alludes to W.B. Yeats “Song of the Wandering Aengus,” where the apple blossoms and the quest for the glimmering girl are a quest for reclamation of a sense of self and lost faith.

    The remaining boxes combine personal narrative with imagery inspired by African Vodun, popularly known as Voodoo. American Voodoo evolved as a transformation of a number of African religious influences, Catholicism, and Spiritualism. Out of this, an aesthetic of spiritual objects and personal altars evolved.

    The hand-held altar is a gris-gris, created to be carried as a personal protection. My altar installations extend the reliquary metaphor to create a place for a communicative exchange between the spiritual world and the world of everyday life.

    “Brain Cell,” “At the Gates 2,” “Descanso,” and “Assumption” are images dedicated to Esu and Gede. Esu is the guardian of the gates. As such, he plays an important role in all significant moments in life when an individual or community is at a crossroads, and important decisions need to be made or actions taken. Esu is also the Loa (spirit) of commu­nication between human and divine forces. Finally, Esu is a trickster and a patron saint of rebel heroes who disrupt the status quo in order to bring about a greater and fuller social harmony. He is often represented as a mischievous child who likes things he can’t have (cigars, cigarettes, rum, matches) as well as toys and candy. Keys for Esu refer to his associ­ation with St. Peter. Conical figures with a cowrie shell lace are found in altars from Benin to Brazil, Trinidad, and the United States. Esu’s associ­ation with systems and networks is iterated in RJ45 connectors and similar items left on contemporary altars.

    Gede is closely related to Esu and is also associated with the crossroads, but more so with the junction between life and death. Gede imagery almost always includes cemetery crosses and skulls. His ability to see into two worlds positions him as the master of all healers. Gede is also the protector of infants and children. Together, these images are about defining moments and crossroads. They address issues of healing, empowerment, change. They are invocations, reflections.

  • Cone Editions Press
    Priestess Miriam Chamani
    Mississippi State University

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Iris print on Translite lightbox
  • 18" X 21"
  • history, iris print, and religion
  • At the Gates I
  • Anna Maria Chupa
  • SIGGRAPH 1997: Ongoings
  • 1996
  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Iris Print on Translite Lightbox
  • 19 1/2 in x 15 1/4 in
  • Brain Cell
  • Anna Maria Chupa
  • SIGGRAPH 1997: Ongoings
  • 20" X 13 1/2"
  • 1996 Chupa Brain Cell
  • The historical sources for my use of compressed space, intricate surface, horror vacui, and valenced imagery are medieval manuscripts and reliquaries, Kongo minkisi, and Fon bocio. As different as they may be in form and media, the Celtic carpet pages and minkisi/bocio share a common aesthetic impetus of revelation and concealment, sensuous surface and mystical presence.

    Fon (Republic of Benin) and Kongo (Zaire) artist-priests create bocio and minkisi respectively as objects of personal empowerment. These power objects are assembled with a variety of layered objects, each alluding to medicine, healing, patron spirits, and the dead. Empowered with the forces of the spirits and the dead, the bocio/minkisi counter danger and hostility, promoting well-being in times of stress, (Blier, 1995:73-74) and healing psychologically induced illnesses. “Peacock” contains imagery designed for the protection of my children, while “Aengus” is more immediately self-referential.

    In “Aengus,” the border functions as a binding device that evolved as a personal journey to find containment and integration to counter memo­ries of dissolution. The title alludes to W.B. Yeats “Song of the Wandering Aengus,” where the apple blossoms and the quest for the glimmering girl are a quest for reclamation of a sense of self and lost faith.

    The remaining boxes combine personal narrative with imagery inspired by African Vodun, popularly known as Voodoo. American Voodoo evolved as a transformation of a number of African religious influences, Catholicism, and Spiritualism. Out of this, an aesthetic of spiritual objects and personal altars evolved.

    The hand-held altar is a gris-gris, created to be carried as a personal protection. My altar installations extend the reliquary metaphor to create a place for a communicative exchange between the spiritual world and the world of everyday life.

    “Brain Cell,” “At the Gates 2,” “Descanso,” and “Assumption” are images dedicated to Esu and Gede. Esu is the guardian of the gates. As such, he plays an important role in all significant moments in life when an individual or community is at a crossroads, and important decisions need to be made or actions taken. Esu is also the Loa (spirit) of commu­nication between human and divine forces. Finally, Esu is a trickster and a patron saint of rebel heroes who disrupt the status quo in order to bring about a greater and fuller social harmony. He is often represented as a mischievous child who likes things he can’t have (cigars, cigarettes, rum, matches) as well as toys and candy. Keys for Esu refer to his associ­ation with St. Peter. Conical figures with a cowrie shell lace are found in altars from Benin to Brazil, Trinidad, and the United States. Esu’s associ­ation with systems and networks is iterated in RJ45 connectors and similar items left on contemporary altars.

    Gede is closely related to Esu and is also associated with the crossroads, but more so with the junction between life and death. Gede imagery almost always includes cemetery crosses and skulls. His ability to see into two worlds positions him as the master of all healers. Gede is also the protector of infants and children. Together, these images are about defining moments and crossroads. They address issues of healing, empowerment, change. They are invocations, reflections.

  • Cone Editions Press
    Priestess Miriam Chamani
    Mississippi State University

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Iris Print on Translite lightbox
  • 1996
  • history, iris print, and religion
  • Damballah
  • Anna Maria Chupa
  • SIGGRAPH 1997: Ongoings
  • 1996
  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Iris Print on Translite Lightbox
  • 24 in x 17 3/4 in
  • Descanso
  • Anna Maria Chupa
  • SIGGRAPH 1997: Ongoings
  • 1996
  • 1996 Chupa Descanso
  • The historical sources for my use of compressed space, intricate surface, horror vacui, and valenced imagery are medieval manuscripts and reliquaries, Kongo minkisi, and Fon bocio. As different as they may be in form and media, the Celtic carpet pages and minkisi/bocio share a common aesthetic impetus of revelation and concealment, sensuous surface and mystical presence.

    Fon (Republic of Benin) and Kongo (Zaire) artist-priests create bocio and minkisi respectively as objects of personal empowerment. These power objects are assembled with a variety of layered objects, each alluding to medicine, healing, patron spirits, and the dead. Empowered with the forces of the spirits and the dead, the bocio/minkisi counter danger and hostility, promoting well-being in times of stress, (Blier, 1995:73-74) and healing psychologically induced illnesses. “Peacock” contains imagery designed for the protection of my children, while “Aengus” is more immediately self-referential.

    In “Aengus,” the border functions as a binding device that evolved as a personal journey to find containment and integration to counter memo­ries of dissolution. The title alludes to W.B. Yeats “Song of the Wandering Aengus,” where the apple blossoms and the quest for the glimmering girl are a quest for reclamation of a sense of self and lost faith.

    The remaining boxes combine personal narrative with imagery inspired by African Vodun, popularly known as Voodoo. American Voodoo evolved as a transformation of a number of African religious influences, Catholicism, and Spiritualism. Out of this, an aesthetic of spiritual objects and personal altars evolved.

    The hand-held altar is a gris-gris, created to be carried as a personal protection. My altar installations extend the reliquary metaphor to create a place for a communicative exchange between the spiritual world and the world of everyday life.

    “Brain Cell,” “At the Gates 2,” “Descanso,” and “Assumption” are images dedicated to Esu and Gede. Esu is the guardian of the gates. As such, he plays an important role in all significant moments in life when an individual or community is at a crossroads, and important decisions need to be made or actions taken. Esu is also the Loa (spirit) of commu­nication between human and divine forces. Finally, Esu is a trickster and a patron saint of rebel heroes who disrupt the status quo in order to bring about a greater and fuller social harmony. He is often represented as a mischievous child who likes things he can’t have (cigars, cigarettes, rum, matches) as well as toys and candy. Keys for Esu refer to his associ­ation with St. Peter. Conical figures with a cowrie shell lace are found in altars from Benin to Brazil, Trinidad, and the United States. Esu’s associ­ation with systems and networks is iterated in RJ45 connectors and similar items left on contemporary altars.

    Gede is closely related to Esu and is also associated with the crossroads, but more so with the junction between life and death. Gede imagery almost always includes cemetery crosses and skulls. His ability to see into two worlds positions him as the master of all healers. Gede is also the protector of infants and children. Together, these images are about defining moments and crossroads. They address issues of healing, empowerment, change. They are invocations, reflections.

  • Cone Editions Press
    Priestess Miriam Chamani
    Mississippi State University

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Iris print on Translite lightbox
  • 19 1/2" X 22"
  • history, iris print, and religion
  • Ezili Freda
  • Anna Maria Chupa
  • SIGGRAPH 1997: Ongoings
  • 1996
  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Iris Print on Translite Lightbox
  • 23 1/4 in x 14 in
  • Fava Milagro
  • Anna Maria Chupa
  • SIGGRAPH 1999: technOasis
  • 1998
  • Fava Milagro receives its title from tiny votive offerings called milagros and from fava beans. Fava beans are considered lucky because the fava plant was the only plant that thrived during a major famine in Sicily. Reprieve from this famine was attributed to St. Joseph’s intercession.

    Documentation of religious shrines has influenced the artist’s work in digital media for the past three years. Her most recent digital collages are inspired by devotional sites in Holy Land (Waterbury, Connecticut USA) and Ave Maria Grotto (Cullman, Alabama USA) as well as the more temporary altars created in celebration of St. Joseph’s feast day in New Orleans. Other conceptual influences derive from Celtic illuminated manuscripts and African-Atlantic altars. The transformative powers of these devotional works are echoed in the personal stories told by those who create them.

    The artist’s digital collages combine idiosyncratic fragments of personal narratives with universal archetypes. By manipulating scale, contrast, and relative visibility of detail, she maintains a tension between accessibility and obscurity. Although the symmetries suggest order and control, the actual process of making the patterns is more like automatic writing or glossolalia.

    Fava Milagro and Mary’s Helpers are part of a body of work created for a traveling exhibition, Saints Among Us, funded in part by the J.W. Criss Fund and Mississippi State University. Participating artists were Anna Chupa, Anne Hanger, and Kristen Woodward. For more information, see:

    www.erc.msstate.edu/-achupa/saints/

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Lightjet Print (C-Print) on Semi Matte Paper
  • 10 X 10
  • http://www.erc.msstate.edu/-achupa/saints/ 
  • collage, digital imagery, lightjet print, and religion
  • Mary's Helpers
  • Anna Maria Chupa
  • SIGGRAPH 1999: technOasis
  • 1998
  • Mary’s Helpers receives its title from one of the locations of a St. Josephs altar in Gretna, Louisiana USA. Details from the altar form some of the patterns. The image of Mary is from a statue of Our Lady of Fatima, photographed at another altar location.

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Lightjet Print (C-Print) on Semi Matte Paper
  • 10 x 10
  • lightjet print, pattern, and religion
  • Nou La
  • Anna Maria Chupa
  • SIGGRAPH 2007: Global Eyes
  • 2007
  • Nou La combines imagery from two religious traditions in New Orleans with documentary photography of the Ninth Ward shot seven months after the 2005 hurricane season. The altar imagery is based upon transformations of two traditions: African Vodun in New Orleans,
    specifically Priestess Miriam’s New Orleans Voodoo Spiritual Temple, and the Italian American celebration of St. Joseph’s feast day. The St. Joseph’s Day altar tradition was brought to New Orleans by Sicilian immigrants. It celebrates gratitude for St. Joseph’s intercession during a famine. These public altars are open to the public on St. Joseph’s feast day (March 19) and focus on distributing food to the poor.The 2006 feast day also marked the third anniversary of the invasion of Iraq, when the Veterans and Hurricane Survivors March from Mobile to New Orleans passed through the Ninth Ward. Montages in the installation (Expedite, Oya, Obatala, St. Lucy, Erzulie Dantor) invoke intercession for protection against hurricanes (Oya, Dantor), protection for children, calm in the midst of chaos (Obatala), action on behalf of those least empowered (Expedite), and protection for the poor (St. Lucy). A statue of St. Expedite in the church of Guadalupe, originally the mortuary chapel for the famed St. Louis Cemetery Number 1, is an apt symbol for the many community-action organizations in evidence during St. Joseph’s weekend 2006. He is the patron saint of prompt solutions to problems. The fabric, ribbon and Expedite-stamped fringe on the installation borrows from similar flag and fringe traditions seen in Vodun altars. The waving fringe activates ashe, the sacred power to enable healing transformations.

  • Nou La references a SIGGRAPH 96 installation, photography of 12 St. Joseph’s Day altars, and four Vodun altars taken over a 10-year period, and recombines all of these with imagery from a visit in March following the 2005 hurricane season. The primary medium of the St. Joseph altar is food. Vodun altars are set apart from each other by fabric draperies, hence the use of fabric here. Images of saints with the symbols specific to the loa (spirits) are combined with food and coded offerings.The altars are reinterpreted as montages that include the St. Expedite and Obatala lenticular prints and the St. Lucy image printed with acid dyes on Habotai 10-millimeter silk. Two additional composite saints’ images date from the 1996 Altar installation. All of the Ninth Ward shots and most of the New Orleans altar shots are presented with minimal manipulation (cropping, exposure correction). The remaining still images are printed on matte paper and overlap one another in the installation at varying depths from the wall (from flush to two inches). The succession of images in the monitor is organized as a screensaver. At some points, only details are presented, and at other points, the monitor presents a wider-angle view.

  • Installation
  • Peacock
  • Anna Maria Chupa
  • SIGGRAPH 1997: Ongoings
  • 1995
  • 1995 Chupa Peacock
  • The historical sources for my use of compressed space, intricate surface, horror vacui, and valenced imagery are medieval manuscripts and reliquaries, Kongo minkisi, and Fon bocio. As different as they may be in form and media, the Celtic carpet pages and minkisi/bocio share a common aesthetic impetus of revelation and concealment, sensuous surface and mystical presence.

    Fon (Republic of Benin) and Kongo (Zaire) artist-priests create bocio and minkisi respectively as objects of personal empowerment. These power objects are assembled with a variety of layered objects, each alluding to medicine, healing, patron spirits, and the dead. Empowered with the forces of the spirits and the dead, the bocio/minkisi counter danger and hostility, promoting well-being in times of stress, (Blier, 1995:73-74) and healing psychologically induced illnesses. “Peacock” contains imagery designed for the protection of my children, while “Aengus” is more immediately self-referential.

    In “Aengus,” the border functions as a binding device that evolved as a personal journey to find containment and integration to counter memo­ries of dissolution. The title alludes to W.B. Yeats “Song of the Wandering Aengus,” where the apple blossoms and the quest for the glimmering girl are a quest for reclamation of a sense of self and lost faith.

    The remaining boxes combine personal narrative with imagery inspired by African Vodun, popularly known as Voodoo. American Voodoo evolved as a transformation of a number of African religious influences, Catholicism, and Spiritualism. Out of this, an aesthetic of spiritual objects and personal altars evolved.

    The hand-held altar is a gris-gris, created to be carried as a personal protection. My altar installations extend the reliquary metaphor to create a place for a communicative exchange between the spiritual world and the world of everyday life.

    “Brain Cell,” “At the Gates 2,” “Descanso,” and “Assumption” are images dedicated to Esu and Gede. Esu is the guardian of the gates. As such, he plays an important role in all significant moments in life when an individual or community is at a crossroads, and important decisions need to be made or actions taken. Esu is also the Loa (spirit) of commu­nication between human and divine forces. Finally, Esu is a trickster and a patron saint of rebel heroes who disrupt the status quo in order to bring about a greater and fuller social harmony. He is often represented as a mischievous child who likes things he can’t have (cigars, cigarettes, rum, matches) as well as toys and candy. Keys for Esu refer to his associ­ation with St. Peter. Conical figures with a cowrie shell lace are found in altars from Benin to Brazil, Trinidad, and the United States. Esu’s associ­ation with systems and networks is iterated in RJ45 connectors and similar items left on contemporary altars.

    Gede is closely related to Esu and is also associated with the crossroads, but more so with the junction between life and death. Gede imagery almost always includes cemetery crosses and skulls. His ability to see into two worlds positions him as the master of all healers. Gede is also the protector of infants and children. Together, these images are about defining moments and crossroads. They address issues of healing, empowerment, change. They are invocations, reflections.

  • Cone Editions Press
    Priestess Miriam Chamani
    Mississippi State University

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Iris print on Translite lightbox
  • 17" X 17"
  • history, iris print, and religion
  • Saints
  • Anna Maria Chupa
  • SIGGRAPH 1997: Ongoings
  • 1996
  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Iris Print on Translite Lightbox
  • 11 in x 34 in
  • Strato
  • Anna Silberschmidt and Nicola Sansò
  • SIGGRAPH 2008: Design and Computation
  • 2008
  • 2008 Strato Anna Silberschmidt & Nicola Sanso
  • Studio Aphorisma combines innovative designs and processes that push the boundaries of contemporary textile design. The studio collaborates with internationally renowned fashion and interior design companies and institutions such as the Bauhaus-Universität Weimar, for which the Studio recreated two Bauhaus textiles for the reconstructed Gropius Room.

    Strato is a collection of textile-based jewelery and accessories created on a computer-controlled loom. The designs explore the links among materials, new technologies, and traditional crafts. The resulting textiles reflect a deep knowledge of materials and craftmanship, while the process represents an innovation in contemporary design.

    Strato consists of two contrasting elements: a flat, rigid silver bracelet and a soft, flexible tube of woven silver threads. The tube is woven on a computer-controlled loom with light and dark silver threads, and the weave fully encapsulates the structural silver bracelet. Together, the two elements create a soft, flexible structure that makes the bracelet reconfigurable. The design sets rigidity in opposition with softness, stiffness with maleability, and two-dimensionality with three-dimensionality. The overall design balances the hard and soft elements – making the piece exciting in both a visual and a tactile way.

    The woven patterns reflect both flexible structure and changing surface. Through its maleable structure and response to lighting conditions, the piece constantly reconfigures itself. This flexibility allows Strato to transform with inexhaustible variation.

  • Design
  • Catherine Courier
  • Anna Ullrich
  • SIGGRAPH 1998: Touchware
  • 1997
  • 1997 Ullrich Catherine Courier
  • I use the computer to create seamless environments out of incongruous elements, including flatbed-scanned images of objects, appropriated photography, and three-dimensional imagery. My digital montage process is analogous to the activity of sewing.

    I use fabrics and other materials to redress and transform figures, and to create an illusory narrative space. I’m inspired to use a lot of my imagery for the texture it brings to my compositions. Images of fabric, papers, and organic materials create a sensuous tactileness in my prints. I stitch together disparate elements to create a rich embroidered tapestry whose decorative qualities I sometimes use to make subversive content more palatable.

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Cibachrome print
  • 30" x 27.8"
  • cibachrome print, digital imagery, and montage
  • Taut Turnip
  • Anna Ullrich
  • SIGGRAPH 1998: Touchware
  • 1997
  • 1997 Ullrich Taut Turnip
  • I use the computer to create seamless environments out of incongruous elements, including flatbed-scanned images of objects, appropriated photography, and three-dimensional imagery. My digital montage process is analogous to the activity of sewing.

    I use fabrics and other materials to redress and transform figures, and to create an illusory narrative space. I’m inspired to use a lot of my imagery for the texture it brings to my compositions. Images of fabric, papers, and organic materials create a sensuous tactileness in my prints. I stitch together disparate elements to create a rich embroidered tapestry whose decorative qualities I sometimes use to make subversive content more palatable.

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Cibachrome print
  • 24" x 15.4"
  • cibachrome print, digital imagery, and montage
  • The Assumption of Pleasure
  • Anna Ullrich
  • SIGGRAPH 1999: technOasis
  • 1998
  • This final piece in a loose trilogy that surrounds the Destruction, the Manufacture, and the Assumption of Pleasure expresses a desire for mastery and control over the male subject. The female subject assumes control of the production of female and male pleasure while smothering a male revolt.

  • 2D & Wall-Hung
  • Ilfochrome print
  • 35 inches x 65 inches x .05 inches
  • digital imagery and ilfochrome print
  • The Decorative Arts of the Mariner
  • Anna Ullrich
  • SIGGRAPH 1997: Ongoings
  • 1996
  • 1996 Ullrich Decorative
  • My body of work seduces. I scan objects such as fabric, newspaper, and rope to create folds, crevices, and hidden spaces. I literally create fabricated landscapes whose tactile imagery urges one to touch the surface of the print.

    No image completely retains its original value or meaning after I’ve transformed it in montage. A newspaper article becomes a hilltop or a corn husk. A plastic cosmetic case becomes a wind turbine. A photograph of a nurse becomes a pirate ship’s soil. I am interested in how the viewer is able to follow these fantastic translations through allusions to familiar farms. The combination of real objects, photographs, and completely computer-generated imagery produces a hybridized landscape that is surreal in its incongruities and yet remains grounded because of references to the familiar.

    My artwork expresses a desire for mastery and control over the male subject. Rather than being concerned with (re)gaining control over imagery of the female subject, I am fascinated with the cultural control inherent in creating imagery of the “other,” in my case, the masculine experience. I imbricate the sexual within the visual through fetishizing the inorganic and invest every object with a throbbing life vein. The subjects within my layered narratives are surrounded by a landscape and objects burgeoning with desire, threats, and anxiety.

    I use Photoshop, for image manipulation, along with an object-oriented and vector-based program, RIO, for laying out my compositions within a PC. My visual sources have included traditional photography, appropriated and computer-generated imagery, and images of objects captured using a flat-bed scanner. This lost method, scanning objects on a flat-bed, has been very important in defining my visual style. My interest in using the flat-bed to capture the various perspectives of objects and to achieve a dramatic three-dimensional quality (due to the modeling effects created by the light source) has drawn me to three-dimensional modeling programs. I now use 3D Studio MAX to create three-dimensional objects and incorporate this imagery alongside my other visual sources. I am currently exploring the possibilities of creating a hybrid between my normal output method, inkj